rag


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rag 1

 (răg)
n.
1.
a. A scrap of cloth.
b. A piece of cloth used for cleaning, washing, or dusting.
2. rags Threadbare or tattered clothing.
3. Cloth converted to pulp for making paper.
4. A scrap; a fragment.
5. Slang A newspaper, especially one specializing in sensationalism or gossip.
6. The stringy central portion and membranous walls of a citrus fruit.
Idiom:
on the rag Vulgar Slang
1. Menstruating.
2. Irritable; grouchy.

[Middle English ragge, ultimately (probably partly by back-formation from raggi, shaggy, ragged) of Old Norse origin; akin to Old Icelandic rögg, tuft and Swedish ragg, shaggy hair.]

rag 2

 (răg)
tr.v. ragged, rag·ging, rags
1. Slang
a. To criticize or scold (someone).
b. To criticize or complain about (something).
c. To tease or taunt (someone).
2. Chiefly British To play a joke on.
3. Sports In ice hockey, to maintain possession of (the puck) by outmaneuvering opposing players, especially so as to kill a penalty.
n. Chiefly British
A practical joke; a prank.
Phrasal Verb:
rag on
1. To criticize or scold: ragged on me for being late.
2. To complain about (something).
3. To tease or taunt: ragged on their classmate mercilessly.

[Origin unknown.]

rag 3

 (răg)
n.
1. A roofing slate with one rough surface.
2. Chiefly British A coarsely textured rock.

[Origin unknown.]

rag 4

 (răg)
tr.v. ragged, rag·ging, rags
To compose or play (a piece) in ragtime.
n.
A piece written in ragtime.

[Perhaps from ragged.]

rag

(ræɡ)
n
1. (Textiles)
a. a small piece of cloth, such as one torn from a discarded garment, or such pieces of cloth collectively
b. (as modifier): a rag doll; a rag book; rag paper.
2. a fragmentary piece of any material; scrap; shred
3. (Journalism & Publishing) informal a newspaper or other journal, esp one considered as worthless, sensational, etc
4. (Clothing & Fashion) informal an item of clothing
5. informal a handkerchief
6. (Nautical Terms) slang esp navy Brit a flag or ensign
7. lose one's rag to lose one's temper suddenly
[C14: probably back formation from ragged, from Old English raggig; related to Old Norse rögg tuft]

rag

(ræɡ)
vb (tr) , rags, ragging or ragged
1. to draw attention facetiously and persistently to the shortcomings or alleged shortcomings of (a person)
2. Brit to play rough practical jokes on
n
3. Brit a boisterous practical joke, esp one on a fellow student
4. (Education) (in British universities)
a. a period, usually a week, in which various events are organized to raise money for charity, including a procession of decorated floats and tableaux
b. (as modifier): rag day.
[C18: of uncertain origin]

rag

(ræɡ) jazz
n
(Jazz) a piece of ragtime music
vb, rags, ragging or ragged
(Jazz) (tr) to compose or perform in ragtime
[C20: shortened from ragtime]

rag

(ræɡ)
n
(Building) a roofing slate that is rough on one side
[C13: of obscure origin]

rag1

(ræg)

n.
1. a worthless piece of cloth, esp. one that is torn or worn.
2. rags, ragged or tattered clothing.
3. any article of apparel regarded deprecatingly.
4. a cloth-based pulp used in making high-quality paper, as bond.
5. a shred, scrap, or fragmentary bit of anything.
6. something of very low value or in very poor condition.
7. Informal. a newspaper or magazine regarded with contempt or distaste.
[1275–1325; Middle English ragge < Scandinavian]

rag2

(ræg)

v. ragged, rag•ging,
n. Informal. v.t.
1. to scold.
2. to subject to a teasing.
3. Brit. to torment; tease.
[1790–1800]

rag4

(ræg)

n.
a musical composition in ragtime.
[1895–1900; shortened form of ragtime]

Rag

 a small scrap of cloth; colts collectively.
Examples: rag of canvas, 1823; a flying rag of cloud, 1873; of colts, 1470; no rag of evidence, 1893; of land, 1650; of other languages, 1597; not a rag of money, 1590; lowest rag of the human race (the rabble), 1649; of rhetoric, 1529.

rag


Past participle: ragged
Gerund: ragging

Imperative
rag
rag
Present
I rag
you rag
he/she/it rags
we rag
you rag
they rag
Preterite
I ragged
you ragged
he/she/it ragged
we ragged
you ragged
they ragged
Present Continuous
I am ragging
you are ragging
he/she/it is ragging
we are ragging
you are ragging
they are ragging
Present Perfect
I have ragged
you have ragged
he/she/it has ragged
we have ragged
you have ragged
they have ragged
Past Continuous
I was ragging
you were ragging
he/she/it was ragging
we were ragging
you were ragging
they were ragging
Past Perfect
I had ragged
you had ragged
he/she/it had ragged
we had ragged
you had ragged
they had ragged
Future
I will rag
you will rag
he/she/it will rag
we will rag
you will rag
they will rag
Future Perfect
I will have ragged
you will have ragged
he/she/it will have ragged
we will have ragged
you will have ragged
they will have ragged
Future Continuous
I will be ragging
you will be ragging
he/she/it will be ragging
we will be ragging
you will be ragging
they will be ragging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been ragging
you have been ragging
he/she/it has been ragging
we have been ragging
you have been ragging
they have been ragging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been ragging
you will have been ragging
he/she/it will have been ragging
we will have been ragging
you will have been ragging
they will have been ragging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been ragging
you had been ragging
he/she/it had been ragging
we had been ragging
you had been ragging
they had been ragging
Conditional
I would rag
you would rag
he/she/it would rag
we would rag
you would rag
they would rag
Past Conditional
I would have ragged
you would have ragged
he/she/it would have ragged
we would have ragged
you would have ragged
they would have ragged
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rag - a small piece of cloth or paperrag - a small piece of cloth or paper  
piece of cloth, piece of material - a separate part consisting of fabric
pine-tar rag - baseball equipment consisting of a rag soaked with pine tar; used on the handle of a baseball bat to give a batter a firm grip
2.rag - a week at British universities during which side-shows and processions of floats are organized to raise money for charities
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
hebdomad, week - any period of seven consecutive days; "it rained for a week"
rag day - a day on which university students hold a rag
3.rag - music with a syncopated melody (usually for the piano)rag - music with a syncopated melody (usually for the piano)
dance music - music to dance to
4.rag - newspaper with half-size pages
newspaper, paper - a daily or weekly publication on folded sheets; contains news and articles and advertisements; "he read his newspaper at breakfast"
5.rag - a boisterous practical joke (especially by college students)
practical joke - a prank or trick played on a person (especially one intended to make the victim appear foolish)
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
Verb1.rag - treat cruellyrag - treat cruelly; "The children tormented the stuttering teacher"
madden - drive up the wall; go on someone's nerves
beset, chevvy, chevy, chivvy, chivy, harass, harry, hassle, molest, plague, provoke - annoy continually or chronically; "He is known to harry his staff when he is overworked"; "This man harasses his female co-workers"
hamstring - make ineffective or powerless; "The teachers were hamstrung by the overly rigid schedules"
badger, beleaguer, bug, pester, tease - annoy persistently; "The children teased the boy because of his stammer"
persecute, oppress - cause to suffer; "Jews were persecuted in the former Soviet Union"
2.rag - cause annoyance inrag - cause annoyance in; disturb, especially by minor irritations; "Mosquitoes buzzing in my ear really bothers me"; "It irritates me that she never closes the door after she leaves"
get under one's skin, get - irritate; "Her childish behavior really get to me"; "His lying really gets me"
eat into, rankle, grate, fret - gnaw into; make resentful or angry; "The injustice rankled her"; "his resentment festered"
chafe - feel extreme irritation or anger; "He was chafing at her suggestion that he stay at home while she went on a vacation"
peeve - cause to be annoyed, irritated, or resentful
ruffle - trouble or vex; "ruffle somebody's composure"
fret - cause annoyance in
beset, chevvy, chevy, chivvy, chivy, harass, harry, hassle, molest, plague, provoke - annoy continually or chronically; "He is known to harry his staff when he is overworked"; "This man harasses his female co-workers"
antagonize, antagonise - provoke the hostility of; "Don't antagonize your boss"
displease - give displeasure to
3.rag - play in ragtime; "rag that old tune"
music - musical activity (singing or whistling etc.); "his music was his central interest"
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
spiel, play - replay (as a melody); "Play it again, Sam"; "She played the third movement very beautifully"
4.rag - harass with persistent criticism or carpingrag - harass with persistent criticism or carping; "The children teased the new teacher"; "Don't ride me so hard over my failure"; "His fellow workers razzed him when he wore a jacket and tie"
bemock, mock - treat with contempt; "The new constitution mocks all democratic principles"
jeer, scoff, flout, gibe, barrack - laugh at with contempt and derision; "The crowd jeered at the speaker"
banter, chaff, jolly, josh, kid - be silly or tease one another; "After we relaxed, we just kidded around"
5.rag - censure severely or angrilyrag - censure severely or angrily; "The mother scolded the child for entering a stranger's car"; "The deputy ragged the Prime Minister"; "The customer dressed down the waiter for bringing cold soup"
castigate, chasten, chastise, objurgate, correct - censure severely; "She chastised him for his insensitive remarks"
brush down, tell off - reprimand; "She told the misbehaving student off"
criticise, criticize, pick apart, knock - find fault with; express criticism of; point out real or perceived flaws; "The paper criticized the new movie"; "Don't knock the food--it's free"
6.rag - break into lumps before sorting; "rag ore"
mining, excavation - the act of extracting ores or coal etc from the earth
fragment, fragmentise, fragmentize, break up - break or cause to break into pieces; "The plate fragmented"

rag

1
noun
1. cloth, piece of cloth He was wiping his oily hands on a rag.
2. (Informal) newspaper, paper, journal, tabloid, newsletter, periodical, broadsheet He works for the local rag.
plural noun
1. tatters, old clothes, tattered clothes, torn clothes, tattered clothing There were men, women and children, some dressed in rags.
tatters finery, Sunday best, gladrags
in rags shabby, ragged, seedy, tattered, down at heel, out at elbow Grandma Jana was ashamed to let Cleave see me in rags.
lose your rag become angry, lose it (informal), fly into a rage, lose your temper, blow a fuse, fly off the handle, throw a wobbly (informal), hit the ceiling, blow a gasket, blow your top, go crook (Austral. & N.Z. slang), blow your stack I've only once seen him lose his rag.

rag

2
verb
1. tease, provoke, needle (informal), mock, bait, rib (informal), wind up (Brit. slang), torment, ridicule, taunt, goad, take the mickey (out of) (informal), take the piss (out of) (taboo slang), gibe, pull someone's leg (informal) She was ten years older than the youngsters ragging her.
noun
1. fundraising event, charity event, charitable event It all feels like a rag week that went on for a few years too long.

rag 1

noun
Torn and ragged clothing.Used in plural:
tatter (used in plural).

rag 2

verb
Slang. To tease or mock good-humoredly:
Informal: kid, rib, ride.
Slang: jive, razz.
Translations
خَرْقَةخِرْقَه
hadrhadryotrhanec
klud
riepu
krpa
tuska
ぼろきれ
헝겊 조각
atspuręsnelygumasnuplyšęsskarmalaiskarmalas
lupataskranda
krparazcapan
trasa
ผ้าขี้ริ้ว
giẻ rách

rag

1 [ræg]
A. N
1. (= piece of cloth) → trapo m rags (= old clothes) → harapos mpl, trapos mpl viejos
to be in ragsandar or estar en harapos
dressed in ragscubierto de harapos
from rags to richesde pobre a rico
to feel like a wet ragestar hecho un trapo
to put on one's glad ragsvestirse de domingo
to chew the rag (US) (= chat) → charlar, pasar el rato; (= argue) → discutir
it's like a red rag to a bullno hay nada que más le enfurezca
to lose one's rag (Brit) → perder los estribos
2. (= newspaper) → periodicucho m, periódico m de mala muerte
B. CPD rag doll Nmuñeca f de trapo
the rag trade Nla industria de la confección

rag

2 [ræg]
A. N (= practical joke) → broma f pesada (Univ) (= parade) → fiesta f benéfica (de estudiantes)
B. VT (= tease) → tomar el pelo a
they were ragging him about his new tiele estaban tomando el pelo con la corbata nueva
C. VIguasearse, bromear
I was only ragginglo dije en broma, era sólo una broma
D. CPD rag week Nsemana f de funciones benéficas (estudiantiles)
RAG WEEK
Los universitarios británicos suelen organizar cada año lo que llaman rag week. Es costumbre que, durante esa semana, los estudiantes se disfracen y salgan así vestidos a la calle, pidiendo dinero a los transeúntes con el fin de recaudar fondos para fines benéficos.

rag

[ˈræg]
n
(= piece of old cloth) → chiffon m
a piece of rag → un chiffon
a red rag to a bull (mainly British)un chiffon rouge
to lose one's rag (British)perdre la boule
(pejorative) (= newspaper) → feuille f de chou, canard m
(for charity) attractions organisées par les étudiants au profit d'œuvres de charité
vt (British) (= tease) → taquiner
to rag sb about sth → taquiner qn à cause de qch rags
npl (= old torn clothes) → haillons mpl
in rags [person] → en haillons; [clothes] → en lambeaux
dressed in rags → en haillons
to go from rags to riches → passer de la misère à la richesse
a rags-to-riches story → un conte de féerag-and-bone man [ˌrægənˈbəʊnmæn] nchiffonnier m

rag

:
rag-and-bone man
n (Brit) → Lumpenhändler m, → Lumpensammler m
ragbag
nLumpensack m; (woman) → Schlampe f; (fig)Sammelsurium nt (inf)
rag doll
nFlickenpuppe f

rag

:
rag rug
ragtag and bobtail
nHinz und Kunz (+pl or sing vb); the rag of societyKrethi und Plethi (+pl or sing vb)
ragtime
nRagtime m
rag trade
n (inf)Kleiderbranche f
ragweed
n (Bot) → beifußblättrige Ambrosia
ragwort
n (Bot) → Jakobskraut nt

rag

1
n
Lumpen m, → Fetzen m; (for cleaning) → Lappen m, → Lumpen m; (for paper) → Lumpen pl, → Hadern pl; (inf: = shirt, dress) → Fetzen m (inf); ragsLumpen pl; (inf: = clothes) → Klamotten pl (inf); in ragszerlumpt, abgerissen; rags and tattersabgerissene Lumpen pl; to go from rags to riches (by luck) → vom armen Schlucker zum reichen Mann/zur reichen Frau werden; (by work) → vom Tellerwäscher zum Millionär werden; to feel like a wet rag (inf)total ausgelaugt sein (inf); to lose one’s rag (inf)in die Luft gehen (inf) ? red rag
(pej inf: = newspaper) → Käseblatt nt

rag

2
n (Brit inf) (= joke)Jux m (inf); for a ragaus Jux (inf); rag week (Univ) Woche, in der Studenten durch Aufführungen Geld für Wohltätigkeitszwecke sammeln
vt
(= tease)aufziehen, foppen
(Brit: = play a trick on) to rag somebodyjdm einen Streich spielen, einen Jux mit jdm machen (inf)

rag

1 [ræg] n
a. (piece of cloth) → straccio, cencio rags npl (old clothes) → stracci mpl
in rags → stracciato/a
dressed in rags → vestito/a di stracci
to feel like a wet rag (fam) → sentirsi uno straccio
b. (fam) (newspaper) → giornalaccio

rag

2 [ræg]
1. n (practical joke) → scherzo (Univ) (events) festa studentesca a scopo di beneficenza
2. vt (Brit) (old) (tease) → prendere in giro

rag

(rӕg) noun
a piece of old, torn or worn cloth. I'll polish my bike with this old rag.
ˈragged (ˈrӕgid) adjective
1. dressed in old, worn or torn clothing. a ragged beggar.
2. torn. ragged clothes.
3. rough or uneven; not straight or smooth. a ragged edge.
ˈraggedly adverb
ˈraggedness noun
rags noun plural
old, worn or torn clothes. The beggar was dressed in rags.

rag

خَرْقَة hadr klud Fetzen κουρέλι trapo riepu guenille krpa straccio ぼろきれ 헝겊 조각 vod fille szmata trapo ковер trasa ผ้าขี้ริ้ว çaput giẻ rách 抹布
References in classic literature ?
One forlorn fragment of dollanity had belonged to Jo and, having led a tempestuous life, was left a wreck in the rag bag, from which dreary poorhouse it was rescued by Beth and taken to her refuge.
That's manifest; and clearer than the heavens above our heads," returned the undisturbed scout; "but either she, or they that have robbed her, have passed the bush; for I remember the rag she wore to hide a face that all did love to look upon.
This rag of scarlet cloth -- for time, and wear, and a sacrilegious moth had reduced it to little other than a rag -- on careful examination, assumed the shape of a letter.
For to go as a passenger you must needs have a purse, and a purse is but a rag unless you have something in it.
One day an old gentleman was riding with him, and a large piece of white paper or rag blew across just on one side of me.
She drew out a dirty rag, in one corner of which she had something tied.
The woman opened to him the door of a little parlor, covered with a rag carpet, where stood a table with a very shining black oil-cloth, sundry lank, high-backed wood chairs, with some plaster images in resplendent colors on the mantel-shelf, above a very dimly-smoking grate; a long hard-wood settle extended its uneasy length by the chimney, and here Haley sat him down to meditate on the instability of human hopes and happiness in general.
There was no gas, there were no candles; a bronze dish half full of boarding-house butter with a blazing rag floating in it was the thing that produced what was regarded as light.
There was a fuss betwixt Major-General Tommy Drake and Lieutenant-Colonel Agnes Frisbie, and he snatched her doll away, which is made of white kid stuffed with sawdust, and tore every rag of its clothes off, right before them all, and is under arrest, and the charge is conduct un - "
I'm homesick from ear-socket to crupper, and from crupper to hock-joint; but it ain't any use, I've got to stay here, till the old man drops the rag and give the word--yes, SIR, right here in this country I've got to linger till the old man says COME
We busted it up, and chased the children up the hollow; but we never got anything but some doughnuts and jam, though Ben Rogers got a rag doll, and Jo Harper got a hymn-book and a tract; and then the teacher charged in, and made us drop everything and cut.
I saw in a minute that there was some sarcasm done up in that rag somewheres, but I never let on.