raider


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raid

 (rād)
n.
1. A surprise attack by a small armed force.
2. A sudden forcible entry into a place by police: a raid on a gambling den.
3. An entrance into another's territory for the purpose of seizing goods or valuables.
4. A predatory operation mounted against a competitor, especially an attempt to lure away the personnel or membership of a competing organization.
5. An attempt to seize control of a company, as by acquiring a majority of its stock.
6. An attempt by speculators to drive stock prices down by coordinated selling.
v. raid·ed, raid·ing, raids
v.tr.
To make a raid on.
v.intr.
To conduct a raid or participate in one.

[Scots, raid on horseback, from Middle English rade, from Old English rād, a riding, road; see reidh- in Indo-European roots.]

raid′er n.
Word History: Raid and road both descend from the Old English word rād, which meant primarily "the act of riding" but could also be used specifically to describe an act of riding with hostile intent—that is, a raid. The ai in raid represents the standard development of the Old English vowel ā in Scots and the dialects of northern England, while the oa in road represents the standard development of Old English ā in the dialects of southern England. In the dialects of southern England, road retained its earlier senses of "journey on horseback" and "hostile foray" until the mid-1600s, when the modern sense "public way" became the most common meaning of the word. Later, Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832) helped popularize the northern form of the word, raid, through his collections of Scots ballads and his other writings. In the meaning "a military expedition on horseback," raid became part of the general vocabulary of English outside of Scotland and northern England. A trace of the earlier meaning of road, "foray, raid," can still be detected in the compound inroad, literally "a riding or advance into."

raid•er

(ˈreɪ dər)

n.
1. one that raids.
2.
a. a commando, ranger, etc., trained to participate in military raids.
b. a light, fast warship, aircraft, etc., used in raids.
[1860–65]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.raider - someone who takes spoils or plunder (as in war)raider - someone who takes spoils or plunder (as in war)
war, warfare - the waging of armed conflict against an enemy; "thousands of people were killed in the war"
buccaneer, sea robber, sea rover, pirate - someone who robs at sea or plunders the land from the sea without having a commission from any sovereign nation
stealer, thief - a criminal who takes property belonging to someone else with the intention of keeping it or selling it
2.raider - a corporate investor who intends to take over a company by buying a controlling interest in its stock and installing new management
corporate investor - a company that invests in (acquires control of) other companies

raider

noun attacker, thief, robber, plunderer, invader, forager (Military), marauder, reiver (dialect) The raiders escaped with cash and jewellery.
Translations
مُغير
nájezdník
tyv
ræningi
akıncıyağmacı

raider

[ˈreɪdəʳ] N
1. (across frontier) → invasor(a) m/f
2. (in bank etc) → asaltante mf
3. (= plane) → bombardero m
4. (= ship) → buque m corsario

raider

[ˈreɪdər] n
(= thief) → malfaiteur m
(also corporate raider) → raider m

raider

n (= bandit)Gangster(in) m(f); (= thief)Einbrecher(in) m(f); (in bank) → Bankräuber(in) m(f); (= ship)Kaperschiff nt; (= plane)Überfallflugzeug nt

raider

[ˈreɪdəʳ] n (bandit) → bandito; (bank raider) → rapinatore/trice; (plane) → aeroplano da incursione

raid

(reid) noun
a sudden, short and usually unexpected attack. The enemy made a raid on the docks; The police carried out a raid on the gambling den.
verb
1. to make a raid on. The police raided the gambling club.
2. to take things from. I'm hungry – let's raid the fridge.
ˈraider noun
The raiders burned down all the houses.
References in classic literature ?
B replies by wireless telegraphy that he is now in the act of bombarding the chief manufacturing city of A by means of three raider airships.
For months the renegade Belgian rode with the savage raider.
1] Late in July, 1916, an item in the shipping news mentioned a Swedish sailing vessel, Balmen, Rio de Janiero to Barcelona, sunk by a German raider sometime in June.
We cruised for a long time, sinking many vessels, all but one by gunfire, but we did not come across a German raider.
Some one yelled back to those who had not yet reached the level of the deck: "It's the raider, the German raider Geier
A chorus of hoarse yells arose from the deck of our own craft: I saw the officers stand suddenly erect in the boat that was approaching us, and I heard loud cries and curses from the raider.
My father was a missionary in the interior and one day there came a band of Arabian slave raiders.
and precious stones set in plumed crest and breastplate and shield, and even in the steel spiked chamfrons of the horses' head armor showed the rich loot which had fallen to the portion of Norman of Torn's wild raiders.
Busuli, the warrior whom he had stalked to the village, told him many of the tribal legends--how, many years before, his people had come many long marches from the north; how once they had been a great and powerful tribe; and how the slave raiders had wrought such havoc among them with their death-dealing guns that they had been reduced to a mere remnant of their former numbers and power.
At last, when my father was a young man, the Arabs came again, but our warriors saw them a long way off, and Chowambi, who was chief then, told his people to gather up their belongings and come away with him--that he would lead them far to the south until they found a spot to which the Arab raiders did not come.
The Arab raiders have returned with their cannibal slaves for our ivory and our women
you have not seen a drove of Nithsdale raiders on their Galloway nags, or you would not speak of loving them.