rainy day


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rainy day

n.
A time of need or trouble.

rainy day

n
a future time of need, esp financial

rain′y day′


n.
a future time of need.
[1570–80]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rainy day - a (future) time of financial needrainy day - a (future) time of financial need; "I am saving for a rainy day"
figure of speech, trope, image, figure - language used in a figurative or nonliteral sense
period, period of time, time period - an amount of time; "a time period of 30 years"; "hastened the period of time of his recovery"; "Picasso's blue period"
References in classic literature ?
And one rainy day I went and looked into ever so many of them.
When the old man died some years after I stepped into his place, and now of course I have top wages, and can lay by for a rainy day or a sunny day, as it may happen, and Nelly is as happy as a bird.
NOT long after Grandfather had told the story of his great chair, there chanced to be a rainy day.
Ask her how long, this rainy day, and she shall answer "fifty year, three months, and a fortnight, by the blessing of heaven, if I live till Tuesday.
As it was a rainy day, she went upstairs to amuse herself in one of the large chambers, and took Polly with her for company.
Women who are never bitter and resentful are often the most querulous; and if Solomon was as wise as he is reputed to be, I feel sure that when he compared a contentious woman to a continual dropping on a very rainy day, he had not a vixen in his eye--a fury with long nails, acrid and selfish.
Anne went to bed that night speechless with misery because Matthew had said the wind was round northeast and he feared it would be a rainy day tomorrow.
Whenever they propagate ideas that menace the Plutocracy, they lose their jobs, in which case, if they have not provided for the rainy day, they descend into the proletariat and either perish or become working- class agitators.
At last there came a rainy day, and after breakfast Mr.
Keggs was merely a passive evil, like toothache or a rainy day.
When I say petticoat, I use the word in its literal sense, not colloquially as a metaphor for its usual wearer, meaning thereby a dainty feminine undergarment seen only by men on rainy days, and one might add washing-days.
He, too, has heard of Homer, and, "if it were not for books," would "not know what to do rainy days," though perhaps he has not read one wholly through for many rainy seasons.