raising


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raise

 (rāz)
v. raised, rais·ing, rais·es
v.tr.
1. To move to a higher position; elevate: raised the loads with a crane. See Synonyms at lift.
2. To set in an upright or erect position: raise a flagpole.
3. To erect or build: raise a new building.
4. To cause to arise, appear, or exist: The slap raised a welt.
5. To increase in size, quantity, or worth: raise an employee's salary.
6. To increase in intensity, degree, strength, or pitch: raised his voice.
7. To improve in rank or dignity; promote: raised her to management level.
8.
a. To grow, especially in quantity; cultivate: raise corn and soybeans.
b. To breed and care for to maturity: raise cattle.
c. To bring up; rear: raise children.
d. To accustom to something from an early age: "a post-World War II generation raised on shopping malls and multiplex cinemas" (Gustav Niebuhr).
9. To put forward for consideration: raised an important question. See Synonyms at broach1.
10. To voice; utter: raise a shout.
11.
a. To awaken; arouse: noise that would raise the dead.
b. To stir up; instigate: raise a revolt.
c. To bring about; provoke: remarks intended to raise a laugh.
12. To make contact with by radio: couldn't raise the control tower after midnight.
13. To gather together; collect: raise money from the neighbors for a charity.
14. To cause (dough) to puff up.
15. To end (a siege) by withdrawing troops or forcing the enemy troops to withdraw.
16. To remove or withdraw (an order).
17. Games
a. To increase (a poker bet).
b. To bet more than (a preceding bettor in poker).
c. To increase the bid of (one's bridge partner).
18. Nautical To bring into sight by approaching nearer: raised the Cape.
19. To alter and increase fraudulently the written value of (a check, for example).
20. To cough up (phlegm).
21. Scots To make angry; enrage.
v.intr. Games
To increase a poker bet or a bridge bid.
n.
1. The act of raising or increasing.
2. An increase in salary.
Idioms:
raise Cain/the devil/hell
1. To behave in a rowdy or disruptive fashion.
2. To reprimand someone angrily.
raise eyebrows
To cause surprise or mild disapproval.
raise the stakes
To increase one's commitment or involvement.

[Middle English raisen, from Old Norse reisa; see er- in Indo-European roots.]

rais′er n.
Usage Note: A traditional usage rule holds that people raise crops and farm animals but rear children. Nonetheless, people have been raising children in English since the 1700s, and the usage has been standard for many generations, at least in American English. The Usage Panelists find the use of raise acceptable both for children and for livestock. The Panelists also approve of using the verb rear for children, but a sizable minority have reservations about using it for livestock. In our 2013 survey, 41 percent disapproved of the sentence The settlers reared cattle in the Valley before it was flooded. This percentage, though still substantial, is a significant decrease from the 60 percent who disapproved of the same sentence in 2002. Although contemporary usage allows writers to raise both children and livestock, careful writers should rear children only.

raising

(ˈreɪzɪŋ)
n
(Grammar) transformational grammar a rule that moves a constituent from an embedded clause into the main clause. See also subject-raising, negative-raising
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.raising - the event of something being raised upwardraising - the event of something being raised upward; "an elevation of the temperature in the afternoon"; "a raising of the land resulting from volcanic activity"
rising, ascension, ascent, rise - a movement upward; "they cheered the rise of the hot-air balloon"
2.raising - the properties acquired as a consequence of the way you were treated as a childraising - the properties acquired as a consequence of the way you were treated as a child
upbringing - properties acquired during a person's formative years
3.raising - helping someone grow up to be an accepted member of the community; "they debated whether nature or nurture was more important"
acculturation, enculturation, socialisation, socialization - the adoption of the behavior patterns of the surrounding culture; "the socialization of children to the norms of their culture"
Adj.1.raising - increasing in quantity or value; "a cost-raising increase in the basic wage rate"
increasing - becoming greater or larger; "increasing prices"
References in classic literature ?
The design of the objection, which has been mentioned, is to preclude standing armies in time of peace, though we have never been informed how far it is designed the prohibition should extend; whether to raising armies as well as to KEEPING THEM UP in a season of tranquillity or not.
And then a man sprang to his feet in the audience, and raising his hand on high, cried: "Justice
On the twenty-fourth he had three hundred pounds to pay to the young gentleman for whom he was trustee, and no chance of raising the money, except the chance that Mr.
It'll cost you three thousand for a look in, but nobody will stop you from raising.
I will not repair the hole in the window and I will train myself to come here at night and sit in the presence of this woman without raising my eyes.
Here's the law a-standing ready to take a man's son away from him -- a man's own son, which he has had all the trouble and all the anxiety and all the expense of raising.
Dolokhov walked slowly without raising his pistol, looking intently with his bright, sparkling blue eyes into his antagonist's face.
I kin remember when she weared worsted boots an' her two feets was no bigger dan yer t'umb an' she weared worsted boots, Miss Smith," she cried, raising her streaming eyes.
By the middle of April, for I made no haste in my work, but rather made the most of it, my house was framed and ready for the raising.
I heard a very warm debate between two professors, about the most commodious and effectual ways and means of raising money, without grieving the subject.
Come, fair one, hold up a little," said Master Pierrat, raising her.
Caderousse, who had raised himself on his knees, and stretched out his arm, tried to draw back, then clasping his hands, and raising them with a desperate effort, "O my God, my God