rakish


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Related to rakish: rakishly

rak·ish 1

 (rā′kĭsh)
adj.
1. Nautical Having a trim, streamlined appearance: "We were schooner-rigged and rakish, with a long and lissome hull" (John Masefield).
2. Dashingly or sportingly stylish; jaunty.

[Probably from rake (from the raking masts of pirate ships).]

rak·ish 2

 (rā′kĭsh)
adj.
Of the character of a rake; dissolute.

rakish

(ˈreɪkɪʃ)
adj
1. dissolute; profligate
2. dashing; jaunty: rakish charm; a hat set at a rakish angle.
[C18: from rake2 + -ish]
ˈrakishly adv
ˈrakishness n

rakish

(ˈreɪkɪʃ)
adj
(Nautical Terms) nautical (of a ship or boat) having lines suggestive of speed

rak•ish

(ˈreɪ kɪʃ)

adj.
1. smart; jaunty; dashing: a rakish hat.
2. (of a vessel) having an appearance suggesting speed.
[1815–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.rakish - marked by up-to-dateness in dress and manners; "a dapper young man"; "a jaunty red hat"
fashionable, stylish - being or in accordance with current social fashions; "fashionable clothing"; "the fashionable side of town"; "a fashionable cafe"
2.rakish - marked by a carefree unconventionality or disreputableness; "a cocktail party given by some...raffish bachelors"- Crary Moore
unconventional - not conventional or conformist; "unconventional life styles"

rakish

1
adjective dashing, smart, sporty, flashy, breezy, jaunty, dapper, natty (informal), debonair, snazzy (informal), raffish, devil-may-care rakish young gentlemen

rakish

adjective
Translations

rakish

[ˈreɪkɪʃ] ADJ
1. (= dissolute) [person] → libertino, disoluto
2. at a rakish angleechado de lado

rakish

[ˈreɪkɪʃ] adj [smile, appearance] → canaille
to wear one's hat at a rakish angle → porter son chapeau incliné pour se donner un air canaille

rakish

1
adj person, appearanceflott, verwegen; lifeverwegen, flott, ausschweifend; to wear one’s hat at a rakish angleden Hut verwegen aufgesetzt haben

rakish

2
adj (Naut) → schnittig

rakish

[ˈreɪkɪʃ] adj
a. (person) → libertino/a, dissoluto/a
b. at a rakish angle (hat) → sulle ventitré
References in classic literature ?
A tricorn trimmed with gold lace was set at a rakish angle over a wig of white curls that dropped down to his waist.
I did not catch what was going on at first, and was, therefore, extremely surprised at noticing George hurriedly smooth out his trousers, ruffle up his hair, and stick his cap on in a rakish manner at the back of his head, and then, assuming an expression of mingled affability and sadness, sit down in a graceful attitude, and try to hide his feet.
Night passes in a twink, and again your rakish craft noses for the wind, whales spout, you glide over buried cities, and have brushes with pirates and cast anchor on coral isles.
Previous to placing it before him, he went into the Aged's room with a clean white cloth, and tied the same under the old gentleman's chin, and propped him up, and put his nightcap on one side, and gave him quite a rakish air.
Pelet, and as I strode down the passage he followed me with one of his laughs--a very French, rakish, mocking sound.
A black patch over one eye gave him a fearfully rakish look.
Suppose a mad dog or a runaway horse was after you, could you get out of the way without upsetting, Colonel," asked the Doctor, with a twinkle in the eyes that were fixed on the rakish hat.
voice coming up again) to set a better example than one of rakish habits, wrappers were put in requisition, and the two young cavaliers volunteered to see the ladies home.
This gave him a rakish eccentric air which, now that he had leisure to observe it, charmed Mr Swiveller exceedingly; therefore, by way of propitiation, he expressed his hope that the gentleman was going to get up, and further that he would never do so any more.
They all assumed to be mighty rakish and knowing, they were not very tidy in their private dresses, they were not at all orderly in their domestic arrangements, and the combined literature of the whole company would have produced but a poor letter on any subject.
There was a rakish, vagabond smartness, and a kind of boastful rascality, about the whole man, that was worth a mine of gold.
It will be perceived, as has been before intimated, that Master Sam had a native talent that might, undoubtedly, have raised him to eminence in political life,--a talent of making capital out of everything that turned up, to be invested for his own especial praise and glory; and having done up his piety and humility, as he trusted, to the satisfaction of the parlor, he clapped his palm-leaf on his head, with a sort of rakish, free-and-easy air, and proceeded to the dominions of Aunt Chloe, with the intention of flourishing largely in the kitchen.