rallies


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ral·ly 1

 (răl′ē)
v. ral·lied, ral·ly·ing, ral·lies
v.tr.
1. To call together for a common purpose; assemble: rally troops at a parade ground.
2. To reassemble and restore to order: rally scattered forces.
3. To rouse or revive from inactivity or decline: paused to refresh themselves and rally their strength.
v.intr.
1. To come together for a common purpose: The candidate's supporters rallied on the common.
2. To join in an effort for a common cause: "In the terror and confusion of change, society rallied round the kings" (Garrett Mattingly).
3.
a. To recover abruptly from a setback, disadvantage, or disease: The patient rallied after the fever broke.
b. To increase sharply in price or value after a decline: The housing market rallied in the spring.
4. Sports To exchange strokes before a point is won, as in tennis.
n. pl. ral·lies
1. A gathering, especially one intended to inspire enthusiasm for a cause: a political rally.
2.
a. A reassembling, as of dispersed troops.
b. The signal ordering this reassembly.
3.
a. An abrupt recovery from a setback, disadvantage, or disease: The doctor was delighted with the patient's rally.
b. A sharp increase in price or value after a decline.
4. Sports
a. An exchange of strokes in a court game such as tennis or volleyball, ending when one side fails to make a good return and resulting in a point or the loss of service.
b. A competition in which automobiles are driven over public roads and under normal traffic regulations but with specified rules as to speed, time, and route.
adj.
In sports such as volleyball, being a system of scoring in which points can be won both by the team that is serving and by the receiving team.

[French rallier, from Old French ralier : re-, re- + alier, to unite, ally; see ally.]

ral·ly 2

 (răl′ē)
v. ral·lied, ral·ly·ing, ral·lies
v.tr.
To tease good-humoredly: "She rallied him upon his battered scalp and his creaking back" (Upton Sinclair).
v.intr.
To engage in good-humored teasing or jesting.

[French railler, from Old French, to tease; see rail3.]

rallies

Long-distance events for production models with driver and navigator, usually held on public roads.
References in classic literature ?
But it is a blessed provision of nature that at times like these, as soon as a man's mercury has got down to a certain point there comes a revulsion, and he rallies.
Gilbert, who was an ardent Conservative, found himself caught in the vortex, being much in demand for speech-making at the various county rallies.
There were rallies, retreats, charges, and counter-charges.
Other greats of the sport to be delivered pace notes by the Northern Irishman included world champions Ari Vatanen - with whom he won the 1997 FIA World Cup for Cross-Country Rallies - and Petter Solberg, making it fitting that the latter was on-hand to help celebrate his former co-driver in Deeside.
The Rally of Lebanon, the fourth tour as part of the Middle East rallies stretches ovre 84.
TWO mega public rallies in the coming days are going to raise poll fever in Bihar.
Winning rallies and winning championships are all about making the best out of the bad situations, keeping your head down, concentrating, and enjoying it, because that's the main thing: if you can drive through it all with a smile on your face it makes it a whole lot easier.
Shaikh Khalid Bin Faisal Al Qassimi, hoping to repeat his 2010 achievement in Kuwait this year, said: "Kuwait International Rally is one of my favourites because the stages are well defined and the terrain is less rugged compared to other rallies, but it is just as competitive.