rallying


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Related to rallying: rallying cry, rallying point

ral·ly 1

 (răl′ē)
v. ral·lied, ral·ly·ing, ral·lies
v.tr.
1. To call together for a common purpose; assemble: rally troops at a parade ground.
2. To reassemble and restore to order: rally scattered forces.
3. To rouse or revive from inactivity or decline: paused to refresh themselves and rally their strength.
v.intr.
1. To come together for a common purpose: The candidate's supporters rallied on the common.
2. To join in an effort for a common cause: "In the terror and confusion of change, society rallied round the kings" (Garrett Mattingly).
3.
a. To recover abruptly from a setback, disadvantage, or disease: The patient rallied after the fever broke.
b. To increase sharply in price or value after a decline: The housing market rallied in the spring.
4. Sports To exchange strokes before a point is won, as in tennis.
n. pl. ral·lies
1. A gathering, especially one intended to inspire enthusiasm for a cause: a political rally.
2.
a. A reassembling, as of dispersed troops.
b. The signal ordering this reassembly.
3.
a. An abrupt recovery from a setback, disadvantage, or disease: The doctor was delighted with the patient's rally.
b. A sharp increase in price or value after a decline.
4. Sports
a. An exchange of strokes in a court game such as tennis or volleyball, ending when one side fails to make a good return and resulting in a point or the loss of service.
b. A competition in which automobiles are driven over public roads and under normal traffic regulations but with specified rules as to speed, time, and route.
adj.
In sports such as volleyball, being a system of scoring in which points can be won both by the team that is serving and by the receiving team.

[French rallier, from Old French ralier : re-, re- + alier, to unite, ally; see ally.]

ral·ly 2

 (răl′ē)
v. ral·lied, ral·ly·ing, ral·lies
v.tr.
To tease good-humoredly: "She rallied him upon his battered scalp and his creaking back" (Upton Sinclair).
v.intr.
To engage in good-humored teasing or jesting.

[French railler, from Old French, to tease; see rail3.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rallying - the act of mobilizing for a common purpose; "the bell was a signal for the rallying of the whole neighborhood"
mobilisation, mobilization - act of marshaling and organizing and making ready for use or action; "mobilization of the country's economic resources"
2.rallying - the feat of mustering strength for a renewed effort; "he singled to start a rally in the 9th inning"; "he feared the rallying of their troops for a counterattack"
exploit, feat, effort - a notable achievement; "he performed a great feat"; "the book was her finest effort"
Adj.1.rallying - rousing or recalling to unity and renewed effort; "a rallying cry"
encouraging - giving courage or confidence or hope; "encouraging advances in medical research"
Translations

rallying

[ˈrælɪɪŋ] CPD rallying call, rallying cry Nllamamiento m (para reanimar la resistencia etc)
rallying point N (Pol, Mil) → punto m de reunión
References in classic literature ?
For a moment he appeared to be conscious of having the worst of the argument, then, rallying again, he answered the objection of his antagonist in the best manner his limited information would allow:
And then will begin the rush that will never be checked, the tide that will never turn till it has reached its flood--that will be irresistible, overwhelming--the rallying of the outraged workingmen of Chicago to our standard
I was actually permitting myself to experience a sickening sense of disappointment; but rallying my wits, and recollecting my principles, I at once called my sensations to order; and it was wonderful how I got over the temporary blunder--how I cleared up the mistake of supposing Mr.
I, for my part, began to fancy my forebodings were false, and that he must be actually rallying, when he mentioned riding and walking on the moors, and seemed so earnest in pursuing his object.
When we had come out again, and had got rid of the boys who had been put into great spirits by the expectation of seeing me publicly tortured, and who were much disappointed to find that my friends were merely rallying round me, we went back to Pumblechook's.
Du Bousquier, that fanatic liberal now concealed under the skin of a royalist, knowing how necessary rallying points are to all discontents(which are really at the bottom of all oppositions), had drawn the sympathies of the middle classes around the rector.
And he who becomes master of a city accustomed to freedom and does not destroy it, may expect to be destroyed by it, for in rebellion it has always the watchword of liberty and its ancient privileges as a rallying point, which neither time nor benefits will ever cause it to forget.
Those who were called skillful leaders of old knew how to drive a wedge between the enemy's front and rear; to prevent co-operation between his large and small divisions; to hinder the good troops from rescuing the bad, the officers from rallying their men.
He had the impulse to make a rallying speech, to sing a battle hymn, but he could only get his tongue to call into the air: "Why--why--what--what 's th' matter?
asked D'Artagnan, in that rallying tone which may indicate either compassion or mockery.