ramble

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Related to rambled: descended

ram·ble

 (răm′bəl)
v. ram·bled, ram·bling, ram·bles
v.intr. ram·bled, ram·bling, ram·bles
1. To move about aimlessly: rambled around the park for an hour; rambled around the southwest. See Synonyms at wander.
2. To walk casually or leisurely: rambled over to the neighbor's house.
3. To follow an irregularly winding course of motion or growth: Vines rambled over the fence.
4. To speak or write at length and with many digressions: rambled on about his childhood.
v.tr.
To move about aimlessly through or over: rambled the back streets of town.
n.
A leisurely, sometimes lengthy walk.

[Probably from Middle Dutch *rammelen, to wander about in a state of sexual desire, from rammen, to copulate with.]

ramble

(ˈræmbəl)
vb (intr)
1. to stroll about freely, as for relaxation, with no particular direction
2. (of paths, streams, etc) to follow a winding course; meander
3. (Botany) (of plants) to grow in a random fashion
4. (of speech, writing, etc) to lack organization
n
a leisurely stroll, esp in the countryside
[C17: probably related to Middle Dutch rammelen to roam (of animals); see ram]

ram•ble

(ˈræm bəl)

v. -bled, -bling,
n. v.i.
1. to wander around in a leisurely, aimless manner; stroll.
2. to take a course with many turns or windings, as a stream or path.
3. to grow or spread in a random, unsystematic fashion, as a vine.
4. to talk or write in a discursive, aimless manner: The speaker rambled on endlessly.
v.t.
5. to walk aimlessly or idly over or through.
n.
6. a leisurely walk without a definite route, taken merely for pleasure.
[1610–20; orig. uncertain]
ram′bling•ly, adv.
ram′bling•ness, n.

ramble


Past participle: rambled
Gerund: rambling

Imperative
ramble
ramble
Present
I ramble
you ramble
he/she/it rambles
we ramble
you ramble
they ramble
Preterite
I rambled
you rambled
he/she/it rambled
we rambled
you rambled
they rambled
Present Continuous
I am rambling
you are rambling
he/she/it is rambling
we are rambling
you are rambling
they are rambling
Present Perfect
I have rambled
you have rambled
he/she/it has rambled
we have rambled
you have rambled
they have rambled
Past Continuous
I was rambling
you were rambling
he/she/it was rambling
we were rambling
you were rambling
they were rambling
Past Perfect
I had rambled
you had rambled
he/she/it had rambled
we had rambled
you had rambled
they had rambled
Future
I will ramble
you will ramble
he/she/it will ramble
we will ramble
you will ramble
they will ramble
Future Perfect
I will have rambled
you will have rambled
he/she/it will have rambled
we will have rambled
you will have rambled
they will have rambled
Future Continuous
I will be rambling
you will be rambling
he/she/it will be rambling
we will be rambling
you will be rambling
they will be rambling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been rambling
you have been rambling
he/she/it has been rambling
we have been rambling
you have been rambling
they have been rambling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been rambling
you will have been rambling
he/she/it will have been rambling
we will have been rambling
you will have been rambling
they will have been rambling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been rambling
you had been rambling
he/she/it had been rambling
we had been rambling
you had been rambling
they had been rambling
Conditional
I would ramble
you would ramble
he/she/it would ramble
we would ramble
you would ramble
they would ramble
Past Conditional
I would have rambled
you would have rambled
he/she/it would have rambled
we would have rambled
you would have rambled
they would have rambled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ramble - an aimless amble on a winding course
amble, stroll, saunter, perambulation, promenade - a leisurely walk (usually in some public place)
Verb1.ramble - continue talking or writing in a desultory manner; "This novel rambles on and jogs"
proceed, continue, carry on, go on - continue talking; "I know it's hard," he continued, "but there is no choice"; "carry on--pretend we are not in the room"
2.ramble - move about aimlessly or without any destination, often in search of food or employmentramble - move about aimlessly or without any destination, often in search of food or employment; "The gypsies roamed the woods"; "roving vagabonds"; "the wandering Jew"; "The cattle roam across the prairie"; "the laborers drift from one town to the next"; "They rolled from town to town"
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
maunder - wander aimlessly
gad, gallivant, jazz around - wander aimlessly in search of pleasure
drift, err, stray - wander from a direct course or at random; "The child strayed from the path and her parents lost sight of her"; "don't drift from the set course"
wander - go via an indirect route or at no set pace; "After dinner, we wandered into town"

ramble

noun
1. walk, tour, trip, stroll, hike, roaming, excursion, roving, saunter, traipse (informal), peregrination, perambulation an hour's ramble through the woods
verb
1. walk, range, drift, wander, stroll, stray, roam, rove, amble, saunter, straggle, traipse (informal), go walkabout (Austral.), perambulate, stravaig (Scot. & Northern English dialect), peregrinate freedom to ramble across the moors
2. (often with on) babble, go on, gas, wander, rabbit (on) (Brit. informal), rattle, chatter, spout, waffle (informal, chiefly Brit.), drivel, drone on, gab, twitter, digress, jabber, gabble, rattle on, maunder, witter on (informal), blether, expatiate, run off at the mouth (slang) Sometimes she tended to ramble.

ramble

verb
1. To move about at random, especially over a wide area:
2. To walk at a leisurely pace:
Informal: mosey.
3. To turn aside, especially from the main subject in writing or speaking:
Idiom: go off at a tangent.
noun
An act of walking, especially for pleasure:
amble, meander (often used in plural), perambulation, promenade, saunter, stroll, walk, wander.
Translations
نُزْهَه، تَجَوُّليَتَجَوَّل، يَتَنَزَّهيَشُطُّ في الكَلام
procházet seprocházkatúražvanit
vandrevandreturvrøvle
kószálás
gönguferîráfavaîa úr einu í annaî
kalbėti be sąryšioklajotiklajotojasnerišluspakrikas
klaiņotpastaigapastaigāties
trepať
izletpotepanje
ipe sapa gelmez lâflar etmekkırlarda dolaşmaşaşkın şaşkın konuşmakyürüyüşe çıkmak

ramble

[ˈræmbl]
A. Npaseo m, excursión f
to go for a rambledar un paseo
B. VI
1. (= walk) → pasear
we spent a week rambling in the hillspasamos una semana de excursión en la montaña or la sierra
2. (in speech) → divagar, perder el hilo
he just rambled on and onsiguió divagando
3. [river] → formar meandros; [plant] → trepar, enredarse

ramble

[ˈræmbəl]
nrandonnée f
to go for a ramble → faire une randonnée
vi
(= hike) → faire de la randonnée
(= talk confusedly) → radoter
ramble on
vi (= talk at length) → déblatérer
to ramble on about sth → déblatérer sur qch

ramble

nStreifzug m; (esp Brit: = hike) → Wanderung f; to go for or on a rambleeinen Streifzug/eine Wanderung machen
vi
(= wander about)Streifzüge/einen Streifzug machen; (esp Brit: = go on hike) → wandern
(in speech: old person) → unzusammenhängendes Zeug reden, faseln (inf); (pej: also ramble on) → schwafeln (inf), → vom Hundertsten ins Tausendste kommen
(Hort) → ranken, klettern

ramble

[ˈræmbl]
1. n(lunga) passeggiata; (hike) → escursione f
2. vi
a. (walk) → gironzolare, vagare; (hike) → fare escursioni
b. (fig) (in speech) → divagare, dilungarsi
to ramble on → sproloquiare
his mind has started to ramble → è un po' svanito

ramble

(ˈrӕmbl) verb
1. to go for a long walk or walks, usually in the countryside, for pleasure.
2. to speak in an aimless or confused way.
noun
a long walk, usually in the countryside, taken for pleasure.
ˈrambler noun
1. a climbing plant (usually a rose).
2. a person who goes walking in the country for pleasure.
ˈrambling adjective
1. aimless and confused; not keeping to the topic. a long, rambling speech.
2. built (as if) without any plan, stretching in various directions. a rambling old house.
3. (of plants, usually roses) climbing.
ramble on
to talk for a long time in an aimless or confused way.
References in classic literature ?
Since the latter rambled from her side, another inmate had been admitted within the circle of the mother's feelings, and so modified the aspect of them all, that Pearl, the returning wanderer, could not find her wonted place, and hardly knew where she was.
It was the private property of three confederate white seamen of that ship, one of whom, it seems, communicated it to Tashtego with Romish injunctions of secresy, but the following night Tashtego rambled in his sleep, and revealed so much of it in that way, that when he was wakened he could not well withhold the rest.
I rambled round the hamlet, going sometimes to a little distance and returning again, for an hour or more.
And on their behalf he added that night a special prayer to the usual quarter-of-an-hour's supplication before meat, and would have tacked another to the end of the grace, had not his young mistress broken in upon him with a hurried command that he must run down the road, and, wherever Heathcliff had rambled, find and make him re-enter directly!
I rambled downstairs to find anything that was like itself, so altered it all seemed; and roamed into the yard.
At this point my companion left me, and I--well, I confess that I retraced my steps to the common and rambled up that green lane, along which the romantic schoolmaster used to steal in the moonlight to the warm arms of his love.
She then ran gaily off, rejoicing, as she rambled about, in the hope of being at home again in a day or two.
They had rambled to some distance from the palace where their parents dwelt, and were now in a verdant meadow, on one side of which lay the sea, all sparkling and dimpling in the sunshine, and murmuring gently against the beach.
He led them on and on, through a maze of back kitchens, dairies, larders, and sculleries, that melted along covered ways into a farm-house, visibly older than the main building, which again rambled out among barns, byres, pig-pens, stalls and stables to the dead fields behind.
He shook himself like a dog with a flea in his ear, and rambled out of the gate.