ramshackle


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ram·shack·le

 (răm′shăk′əl)
adj.
So poorly constructed or kept up that disintegration is likely; rickety: a ramshackle cabin in the woods.

[Back-formation from obsolete ranshackled, ramshackle, alteration of ransackled, past participle of ransackle, to ransack, frequentative of Middle English ransaken, to pillage; see ransack.]

ramshackle

(ˈræmˌʃækəl)
adj
(esp of buildings) badly constructed or maintained; rickety, shaky, or derelict
[C17 ramshackled, from obsolete ransackle to ransack]

ram•shack•le

(ˈræmˌʃæk əl)

adj.
loosely made or held together; rickety; shaky: a ramshackle house.
[1815–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.ramshackle - in deplorable conditionramshackle - in deplorable condition; "a street of bedraggled tenements"; "a broken-down fence"; "a ramshackle old pier"; "a tumble-down shack"
damaged - harmed or injured or spoiled; "I won't buy damaged goods"; "the storm left a wake of badly damaged buildings"

ramshackle

ramshackle

adjective
Translations
مُتَداعٍ، موشِك على الإنْهِيار
chatrnýna rozpadnutí
faldefærdig
hrörlegur; lélegur
pussagruvissagrabējis
na spadnutie
harapyıkılacak durumda

ramshackle

[ˈræmˌʃækl] ADJ (= tumbledown) [house] → destartalado; [car] → desvencijado

ramshackle

[ˈræmʃækəl] adj
[house, building, hotel] → délabré(e)
[system, organization] → délabré(e)

ramshackle

adj buildingmorsch, baufällig; carklapprig, altersschwach; group, movementschlecht organisiert

ramshackle

[ˈræmˌʃækl] adj (house) → cadente, malandato/a; (car, table) → sgangherato/a

ramshackle

(ˈrӕmʃӕkl) adjective
badly made; likely to fall to pieces. a ramshackle car.
References in classic literature ?
These desperate ones were the dregs of the city's cesspools, wretches who hid at night in the rain-soaked cellars of old ramshackle tenements, in "stale-beer dives" and opium joints, with abandoned women in the last stages of the harlot's progress--women who had been kept by Chinamen and turned away at last to die.
When they got out of the Gare du Nord, and trundled along the cobbled streets in a ramshackle, noisy cab, it seemed to him that he was breathing a new air so intoxicating that he could hardly restrain himself from shouting aloud.
It was a ramshackle affair, dragged along by a knock-kneed, broken-winded somnambulist, which his owner, in a moment of enthusiasm, during conversation, referred to as a horse.
Continually turning round to look at the rows of loaded carts that were making their way from all sides out of Moscow, and balancing his bulky body so as not to slip out of the ramshackle old vehicle, Pierre, experiencing the joyful feeling of a boy escaping from school, began to talk to his driver.
He had been building one of those piles of thought, as ramshackle and fantastic as a Chinese pagoda, half from words let fall by gentlemen in gaiters, half from the litter in his own mind, about duck shooting and legal history, about the Roman occupation of Lincoln and the relations of country gentlemen with their wives, when, from all this disconnected rambling, there suddenly formed itself in his mind the idea that he would ask Mary to marry him.
The villa was a roomy white house, which, as is the case with most continental houses, looked to an English eye frail, ramshackle, and absurdly frivolous, more like a pagoda in a tea-garden than a place where one slept.
Next, he saw a narrow alley, between ramshackle frame buildings.
of the United States are of the Ramshackle order, though some of our
Under a tree in this commanding yet neglected spot was an old ramshackle wooden seat.
From the beginning there had been an ancient and ramshackle cabin.
At the time of the death of Mr Ira Nutcombe, the only all-the-year-round inhabitants were the butcher, the grocer, the chemist, the other customary fauna of villages, and Miss Elizabeth Boyd, who rented the ramshackle farm known locally as Flack's and eked out a precarious livelihood by keeping bees.
Arthur Clennam came to a squeezed house, with a ramshackle bowed front, little dingy windows, and a little dark area like a damp waistcoat-pocket, which he found to be number twenty-four, Mews Street, Grosvenor Square.