gauntlet

(redirected from ran the gauntlet)
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Related to ran the gauntlet: ran the gamut, held the line

gaunt·let 1

also gant·let  (gônt′lĭt, gänt′-)
n.
1. A protective glove, usually extending over some of the forearm, worn as part of medieval armor.
2. Any of various protective gloves, usually with an extended or flared cuff, as used in certain sports such as fencing and motorcycle riding, in cooking to handle hot objects, and other activities.
3. A challenge: throw down the gauntlet; take up the gauntlet.
4. A dress glove cuffed above the wrist.

[Middle English, from Old French gantelet, diminutive of gant, glove, from Frankish *want.]

gaunt·let 2

also gant·let  (gônt′lĭt, gänt′-)
n.
1.
a. A form of punishment or torture in which people armed with sticks or other weapons arrange themselves in two lines facing each other and beat the person forced to run between them.
b. The lines of people so arranged.
2.
a. An arrangement of two lines of menacing or demanding people or things through which one must pass: moved through a gauntlet of shouting reporters.
b. A series of difficult or trying experiences: survived the gauntlet of adolescent humiliations.

[Alteration (influenced by gauntlet) of gantlope, from Swedish gatlopp : gata, lane (from Old Norse; see ghē- in Indo-European roots) + lopp, course, running (from Middle Low German lōp).]
Word History: The two words spelled gauntlet may share associations with medieval violence, but they have separate origins. The word gauntlet used in the idiom to throw down the gauntlet comes from the Old French word gantelet, a diminutive of gant, "glove." (The idiom makes reference to the medieval custom of throwing down a glove in challenging an adversary to combat.) The gauntlet used in to run the gauntlet is an alteration of the earlier English form gantlope, which came from the Swedish word gatlopp, a compound of gata, "lane," and lopp, "course," a word related to lope and leap. The Swedish word for this traditional form of punishment, in which two lines of people beat a person forced to run between them, probably became known to English speakers as a result of the Thirty Years' War. Sweden played a leading role in the coalition of Protestant countries that fought against Spain and the Holy Roman Empire, and at the end of the war, in 1648, the Swedish empire emerged as a great power of Europe. It was during this period of expanding Swedish influence that gatlopp entered English. It seems, however, that from the moment English speakers borrowed the word, they inserted an n into the pronunciation of gatlopp—in the earliest known attestation of the word in English, dating from 1646, it is spelled gantelope. The English word was then influenced by the spelling of the other gauntlet, "a protective glove," eventually leading to the identical spellings used today.

gauntlet

(ˈɡɔːntlɪt) or

gantlet

n
1. (Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) a medieval armoured leather glove
2. (Clothing & Fashion) a heavy glove with a long cuff
3. take up the gauntlet to accept a challenge
4. throw down the gauntlet to offer a challenge
[C15: from Old French gantelet, diminutive of gant glove, of Germanic origin]

gauntlet

(ˈɡɔːntlɪt)
n
1. (Historical Terms) a punishment in which the victim is forced to run between two rows of men who strike at him as he passes: formerly a military punishment
2. (Historical Terms) to suffer this punishment
3. to endure an onslaught or ordeal, as of criticism
4. a testing ordeal; trial
5. (Railways) a variant spelling of gantlet11
[C15: changed (through influence of gauntlet1) from earlier gantlope; see gantlet1]

gaunt•let1

(ˈgɔnt lɪt, ˈgɑnt-)

n.
1. a mailed glove worn with a suit of armor to protect the hand.
2. a glove with an extended cuff.
3. the cuff itself.
Idioms:
1. take up the gauntlet, to accept a challenge to fight.
2. throw down the gauntlet, to challenge someone to fight.
[1375–1425; late Middle English gantelet < Middle French, diminutive of gant glove < Germanic *want-; compare Old Norse vǫttr]
gaunt′let•ed, adj.

gaunt•let2

(ˈgɔnt lɪt, ˈgɑnt-)

n.
1. a former punishment, chiefly military, in which the offender was made to run between two rows of men who struck at him with switches or weapons as he passed.
2. the two rows of men administering this punishment.
3. an attack from two or all sides.
4. a severe test; ordeal.
Idioms:
run the gauntlet, to suffer severe criticism or tribulation.
Also, gantlet (for defs. 1, 2, 4).
[1670–80; alter. of gantlope]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gauntlet - to offer or accept a challengegauntlet - to offer or accept a challenge; "threw down the gauntlet"; "took up the gauntlet"
challenge - a call to engage in a contest or fight
2.gauntlet - a glove of armored leathergauntlet - a glove of armored leather; protects the hand
body armor, body armour, cataphract, coat of mail, suit of armor, suit of armour - armor that protects the wearer's whole body
glove - handwear: covers the hand and wrist
3.gauntlet - a glove with long sleeve
glove - handwear: covers the hand and wrist
4.gauntlet - a form of punishment in which a person is forced to run between two lines of men facing each other and armed with clubs or whips to beat the victim
corporal punishment - the infliction of physical injury on someone convicted of committing a crime

gauntlet

noun
throw down the gauntlet issue a challenge, challenge They have thrown down the gauntlet to their competitors.
Translations
ajojahtikujakujanjuoksutaisteluhansikas

gauntlet

[ˈgɔːntlɪt] N [of knight] → guantelete m, manopla f; [of motorcyclist etc] → guante m
to run the gauntlet (Mil, Hist) → correr baquetas
he had to run a gauntlet of abuse as he arrived for the meetingtuvo que aguantar una sarta de improperios a su llegada a la reunión
to throw down/take up the gauntletarrojar/recoger el guante

gauntlet

[ˈgɔːntlɪt] n
[motorcyclist] → gant mpl (à crispin)
to throw down the gauntlet (= make a challenge) → jeter le gant
to pick up the gauntlet (= accept challenge) → relever le gant
to run the gauntlet of → braver
She was forced to run the gauntlet of 300 jeering demonstrators → Elle avait dû braver les huées de 300 manifestants.

gauntlet

1
n
(of armour)Panzerhandschuh m; to throw down/pick up or take up the gauntlet (fig)den Fehdehandschuh hinwerfen/aufnehmen
(= glove)(Stulpen)handschuh m; (= part of glove)Stulpe f

gauntlet

2
n to run the gauntlet (fig)Spießruten laufen; to (have to) run the gauntlet of somethingeiner Sache (dat)ausgesetzt sein

gauntlet

[ˈgɔːntlɪt] n (of knight) → guanto d'armatura, manopola; (of motorcyclist) → guanto
to run the gauntlet of an angry crowd (fig) → sottoporsi al fuoco di fila di una folla ostile
to throw down the gauntlet → gettare il guanto
References in periodicals archive ?
He was released yesterday and ran the gauntlet of photographers as he walked to a nearby hotel.
RODNEY BERMAN ran the gauntlet of protesters yesterday as some of his council's most controversial decisions came under pressure.
OXTON'S third XI ran the gauntlet on the way to victory at Leigh on Sunday.