ranger


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Related to ranger: forest ranger, S10

rang·er

 (rān′jər)
n.
1. A wanderer; a rover.
2. A member of an armed troop employed in patrolling a specific region.
3. Ranger A member of a group of US soldiers specially trained for making raids either on foot, in ground vehicles, or by airlift.
4.
a. An officer employed to maintain and protect a publicly owned site or tract of land, such as a national forest or a state park.
b. Chiefly British The keeper of a royal forest or park.

ranger

(ˈreɪndʒə)
n
1. (Professions) (sometimes capital) an official in charge of a forest, park, estate, nature reserve, etc
2. (Professions) chiefly US a person employed to patrol a State or national park or forest. Brit equivalent: warden
3. (Professions) US one of a body of armed troops employed to police a State or district: a Texas Ranger.
4. (Military) (in the US and certain other armies) a commando specially trained in making raids
5. a person who wanders about large areas of country; a rover

Ranger

(ˈreɪndʒə) or

Ranger Guide

n
Brit a member of the senior branch of the Guides

Ranger

(ˈreɪndʒə)
n
(Astronautics) any of a series of nine American lunar probes launched between 1961 and 1965, three of which transmitted to earth photographs of the moon

rang•er

(ˈreɪn dʒər)

n.
2. one of a body of armed guards who patrol a region.
3. (often cap.) a U.S. soldier trained for making surprise raids and attacks in small groups.
4. a person who ranges or roves.
5. (esp. in Texas) a member of the state police.
6. Brit. a keeper of a royal forest or park.
[1350–1400]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ranger - a member of the Texas state highway patrolRanger - a member of the Texas state highway patrol; formerly a mounted lawman who maintained order on the frontier
law officer, lawman, peace officer - an officer of the law
2.ranger - an official who is responsible for managing and protecting an area of forestranger - an official who is responsible for managing and protecting an area of forest
coyote - a forest fire fighter who is sent to battle remote and severe forest fires (often for days at a time)
fire fighter, fire-eater, firefighter, fireman - a member of a fire department who tries to extinguish fires
functionary, official - a worker who holds or is invested with an office
3.ranger - a member of a military unit trained as shock troops for hit-and-run raidsranger - a member of a military unit trained as shock troops for hit-and-run raids
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
military man, serviceman, man, military personnel - someone who serves in the armed forces; a member of a military force; "two men stood sentry duty"

ranger

noun warden, guard, gamekeeper a park ranger
Translations
جُنْدي قُوّة خاصَّه، كوماندوحارِس الغابَه
lesníkzvláštní jednotky
kommandosoldatskovrider
erdõõrkommandóslovas csendõr
landvörîurséròjálfaîur hermaîur; landgönguliîi
zvláštna jednotka
bekçikomandoorman koruyucusu

ranger

[ˈreɪndʒəʳ] N
1. (= Girl Guide) → exploradora f
2. (= forest ranger) → guardabosques mf inv

ranger

[ˈreɪndʒər] n
(also forest ranger) → garde m/f forestier/ière
(also park ranger) → garde m/f forestier/ière

ranger

n
(of forest etc)Förster(in), Aufseher(in) m(f)
(US) (= mounted patrolman)Ranger m; (= commando)Überfallkommando nt
(Brit) ranger (scout)/(guide)Ranger m

ranger

[ˈreɪndʒəʳ] n (also forest ranger) → guardia forestale (Am) (mounted policeman) → poliziotto a cavallo

range

(reindʒ) noun
1. a selection or variety. a wide range of books for sale; He has a very wide range of interests.
2. the distance over which an object can be sent or thrown, sound can be heard etc. What is the range of this missile?; We are within range of / beyond the range of / out of range of their guns.
3. the amount between certain limits. I'm hoping for a salary within the range $30,000 to $34,000; the range of a person's voice between his highest and lowest notes.
4. a row or series. a mountain range.
5. in the United States, land, usually without fences, on which cattle etc can graze.
6. a place where a person can practise shooting etc; a rifle-range.
7. a large kitchen stove with a flat top.
verb
1. to put in a row or rows. The two armies were ranged on opposite sides of the valley.
2. to vary between certain limits. Weather conditions here range between bad and dreadful / from bad to dreadful.
3. to go, move, extend etc. His talk ranged over a number of topics.
ˈranger noun
1. a person who looks after a forest or park.
2. (American) a soldier who is a member of a specially trained force; a commando.
References in classic literature ?
A devil draw the teeth of him,'' said Gurth, ``and the mother of mischief confound the Ranger of the forest, that cuts the foreclaws off our dogs, and makes them unfit for their trade
Hark ye, since you are a Ranger, I must e'en demand your service.
It was bought by my late husband, Captain Adolphus Ranger March, who had another residence, The Crest, Appleby.
Nobody axed me, sir, she said' -- at least, nobody but that horrid little Dan Ranger.
No wonder that a man should grow restless under such an inspection as this, to say nothing of the eyes belonging to short Tom Cobb the general chandler and post-office keeper, and long Phil Parkes the ranger, both of whom, infected by the example of their companions, regarded him of the flapped hat no less attentively.
Do you know, friend," asked the scout, gravely, and perhaps with a little of the pride of conscious deserving in his manner, "that this is a band of rangers chosen for the most desperate service, and put under the command of one who, though another might say it with a better face, will not be apt to leave them idle.
She set to work and organized the Sixteen, and called it the First Battalion Rocky Mountain Rangers, U.
The only man who would undertake to raid them was a certain excellent seer, {95} but the will of heaven was against him, for the rangers of the cattle caught him and put him in prison; nevertheless when a full year had passed and the same season came round again, Iphicles set him at liberty, after he had expounded all the oracles of heaven.
Such is the account given by Captain Bonneville of these rangers of the wilderness, and their appearance at the camp was strikingly characteristic.
When I went with Sir William agin’ the French, at Fort Niagara, all the rangers used the rifle; and a dreadful weapon it is, in the hands of one who knows how to charge it, and keep a steady aim.
These were called coureurs des bois, rangers of the woods; originally men who had accompanied the Indians in their hunting expeditions, and made themselves acquainted with remote tracts and tribes; and who now became, as it were, peddlers of the wilderness.
They might well have been considered winged sharks, so striking was their resemblance to those ferocious rangers of the deep.