ransom


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ran·som

 (răn′səm)
n.
1.
a. The release of property or a person in return for payment of a demanded price.
b. The price or payment demanded or paid for such release.
2. Christianity A redemption from sin and its consequences.
tr.v. ran·somed, ran·som·ing, ran·soms
1.
a. To obtain the release of by paying a certain price.
b. To release after receiving such a payment.
2. Christianity To deliver from sin and its consequences.

[Middle English raunson, raunsom, from Old French rançon, from Latin redēmptiō, redēmptiōn-, a buying back; see redemption.]

ran′som·er n.

ransom

(ˈrænsəm)
n
1. the release of captured prisoners, property, etc, on payment of a stipulated price
2. the price demanded or stipulated for such a release
3. rescue or redemption of any kind
4. hold to ransom
a. to keep (prisoners, property, etc) in confinement until payment for their release is made or received
b. to attempt to force (a person or persons) to comply with one's demands
5. a king's ransom a very large amount of money or valuables
vb (tr)
6. to pay a stipulated price and so obtain the release of (prisoners, property, etc)
7. to set free (prisoners, property, etc) upon receiving the payment demanded
8. to redeem; rescue: Christ ransomed men from sin.
[C14: from Old French ransoun, from Latin redemptiō a buying back, redemption]
ˈransomer n

Ransom

(ˈrænsəm)
n
(Biography) John Crowe. 1888–1974, US poet and critic

ran•som

(ˈræn səm)

n.
1. the redemption of a prisoner, kidnapped person, etc., for a price.
2. the price paid or demanded for such redemption.
3. deliverance or rescue from punishment for sin or the means for this, esp. the payment of a redemptive fine.
v.t.
4. to redeem from detention, bondage, etc., by paying a demanded price.
5. to deliver or redeem from punishment for sin.
[1150–1200; ransoun < Old French rançon]

Ran•som

(ˈræn səm)

n.
John Crowe, 1888–1974, U.S. poet, critic, and teacher.

ransom


Past participle: ransomed
Gerund: ransoming

Imperative
ransom
ransom
Present
I ransom
you ransom
he/she/it ransoms
we ransom
you ransom
they ransom
Preterite
I ransomed
you ransomed
he/she/it ransomed
we ransomed
you ransomed
they ransomed
Present Continuous
I am ransoming
you are ransoming
he/she/it is ransoming
we are ransoming
you are ransoming
they are ransoming
Present Perfect
I have ransomed
you have ransomed
he/she/it has ransomed
we have ransomed
you have ransomed
they have ransomed
Past Continuous
I was ransoming
you were ransoming
he/she/it was ransoming
we were ransoming
you were ransoming
they were ransoming
Past Perfect
I had ransomed
you had ransomed
he/she/it had ransomed
we had ransomed
you had ransomed
they had ransomed
Future
I will ransom
you will ransom
he/she/it will ransom
we will ransom
you will ransom
they will ransom
Future Perfect
I will have ransomed
you will have ransomed
he/she/it will have ransomed
we will have ransomed
you will have ransomed
they will have ransomed
Future Continuous
I will be ransoming
you will be ransoming
he/she/it will be ransoming
we will be ransoming
you will be ransoming
they will be ransoming
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been ransoming
you have been ransoming
he/she/it has been ransoming
we have been ransoming
you have been ransoming
they have been ransoming
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been ransoming
you will have been ransoming
he/she/it will have been ransoming
we will have been ransoming
you will have been ransoming
they will have been ransoming
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been ransoming
you had been ransoming
he/she/it had been ransoming
we had been ransoming
you had been ransoming
they had been ransoming
Conditional
I would ransom
you would ransom
he/she/it would ransom
we would ransom
you would ransom
they would ransom
Past Conditional
I would have ransomed
you would have ransomed
he/she/it would have ransomed
we would have ransomed
you would have ransomed
they would have ransomed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ransom - money demanded for the return of a captured personransom - money demanded for the return of a captured person
cost - the total spent for goods or services including money and time and labor
2.ransom - payment for the release of someone
defrayal, defrayment, payment - the act of paying money
3.ransom - the act of freeing from captivity or punishment
recovery, retrieval - the act of regaining or saving something lost (or in danger of becoming lost)
Verb1.ransom - exchange or buy back for money; under threat
crime, criminal offence, criminal offense, law-breaking, offense, offence - (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes"
exchange, interchange, change - give to, and receive from, one another; "Would you change places with me?"; "We have been exchanging letters for a year"

ransom

noun
1. payment, money, price, payoff The ransom demand was made by telephone.
2. release, rescue, liberation, redemption, deliverance the ransom of the victim
verb
1. buy the freedom of, release, deliver, rescue, liberate, buy (someone) out (informal), redeem, set free, obtain or pay for the release of The same system was used for ransoming or exchanging captives.
Translations
فِدْيَةفِدْيَهيَحْتَفِظ بالأسير حتّى تُدْفَع فِديَةُيَفْتَدي بالمال
výkupnévykoupitvymáhat výkupné
løsesumløskøbeholde som gidsel
lunnaat
otkupnina
fogságban tartmegsarcolváltságdíjváltságdíjat fizet
borga lausnargjaldlausnargjald
身代金
몸값
išpirkaišpirkti
izpirktizpirkuma naudaturēt gūstā
výkupnévymáhať výkupné
odkupnina
lösensumma
ค่าไถ่ตัว
fidyefidye ödeyerek kurtarmakrehin tutmak
tiền chuộc

ransom

[ˈrænsəm]
A. Nrescate m
to hold sb to ransompedir un rescate por algn (fig) → poner a algn entre la espada y la pared
see also king A1
B. VTrescatar (Rel) → redimir
C. CPD ransom demand Npetición f de rescate
ransom money Nrescate m, dinero m exigido a cambio del rehén

ransom

[ˈrænsəm]
nrançon f
to hold sb ransom (British) to hold sb for ransom (US) (= hold as hostage) → retenir qn en otage, retenir qn en otage
to hold sb to ransom (fig) (= coerce) → prendre qn en otage
modif [demand] → de rançon; [money] → de la rançon; [note] → de demande de rançon
vt (= pay ransom for) [+ captive] → payer la rançon de

ransom

nLösegeld nt; (= rescue)Auslösung f; (= release)Freilassung f; (Rel) → Erlösung f; to hold somebody to (Brit) or for (US) ransom (lit)jdn als Geisel halten; (fig)jdn erpressen ? king
vt (= buy free)auslösen, Lösegeld bezahlen für; (= set free)gegen Lösegeld freilassen; (Rel) → erlösen

ransom

[ˈrænsəm]
1. nriscatto
to hold sb to ransom → tenere in ostaggio qn (per denaro) (fig) → tenere qn in scacco
2. vtriscattare

ransom

(ˈrӕnsəm) noun
a sum of money etc paid for the freeing of a prisoner. They paid a ransom of $40,000; (also adjective) They paid $40,000 in ransom money.
verb
1. to pay money etc to free (someone).
2. to keep (a person) as a prisoner until a sum of money etc is paid for his release.
hold to ransom
to keep (a person) as a prisoner until a sum of money etc is paid for his release.

ransom

فِدْيَة výkupné løsesum Lösegeld λύτρα rescate lunnaat rançon otkupnina riscatto 身代金 몸값 losgeld løsepenger okup resgate выкуп lösensumma ค่าไถ่ตัว fidye tiền chuộc 赎金
References in classic literature ?
Early that evening George went into Ransom Surbeck's pool room with Seth Richmond and Art Wilson, son of the town butcher.
The Indian smiled grimly, and extended one hand, in sign of a willingness to exchange, while, with the other, he flourished the babe over his head, holding it by the feet as if to enhance the value of the ransom.
He was lodged in the prison, not as suspected of any offence, but as the most convenient and suitable mode of disposing of him, until the magistrates should have conferred with the Indian sagamores respecting his ransom.
They too were sent to New Orleans; but were afterwards redeemed, at an enormous ransom, and brought back.
The most conspicuously situated lady in that massed flower-bed of feminine show and finery inclined her head by way of assent, and then the spokesman of the prisoners delivered himself and his fellows into her hands for free pardon, ransom, captivity, or death, as she in her good pleasure might elect; and this, as he said, he was doing by command of Sir Kay the Senes- chal, whose prisoners they were, he having vanquished them by his single might and prowess in sturdy conflict in the field.
After that, for weeks, he spent all his midnights in his magnificent mine, inspecting it in security, gloating over its marvels at his leisure, and always slipping back to his obscure lodgings before dawn, with a duke's ransom under his cloak.
Why can't a body take a club and ransom them as soon as they get here?
He ask'd, but all the Heav'nly Quire stood mute, And silence was in Heav'n: on mans behalf Patron or Intercessor none appeerd, Much less that durst upon his own head draw The deadly forfeiture, and ransom set.
According to the laws of chivalry,'' said the foremost of these men, ``I, Baldwin de Oyley, squire to the redoubted Knight Brian de Bois-Guilbert, make offer to you, styling yourself, for the present, the Disinherited Knight, of the horse and armour used by the said Brian de Bois-Guilbert in this day's Passage of Arms, leaving it with your nobleness to retain or to ransom the same, according to your pleasure; for such is the law of arms.
They agree for their ransom, and are part of them dismissed.
To these banos, as I have said, some private individuals of the town are in the habit of bringing their captives, especially when they are to be ransomed; because there they can keep them in safety and comfort until their ransom arrives.
She is very small and very beautiful; I had hoped that they would hold her for ransom.