rare gas

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rare gas

n.

rare gas

n
(Elements & Compounds) another name for inert gas1
Translations
gaz rare

rare gas

nEdelgas nt
References in periodicals archive ?
Contract notice: supply of a mass spectrometer for high precision measurement of isotopes of rare gases in the air.
TGO will play a key role in the ExoMars mission from orbit as it looks for rare gases including methane, and tell scientists whether Martian methane is most likely to have a geological or biological origin.
Rare Gases Market By Type (Neon, Xenon, Krypton), by End-Use (Manufacturing & Construction, Electronics, Automotive, Healthcare), by Transportation Mode (Cylinders, Tonnage Distribution, Bulk Delivery, by Function (Illumination, Insulation) - Forecast to 2020
With a squeeze, an organic molecule can snatch rare gases from the air.
Rare gases are produced by fractional distillation of atmospheric air, using an Air Separation Unit (ASU).
a provider of solutions to measure rare gases for applications across the energy/utility and scientific markets; vice president of operations and administration for CardioDx Inc.
It was selected because of two unique devices for analysing the samples - Manchester hosts the most sensitive system in the world for analysing the rare gases xenon and krypton.
In addition, the facility will produce nitrogen, argon and rare gases - bringing the total daily capacity to 5,000 tonnes.
The ministry will also get the Japan Chemical Analysis Center, a government-backed institute in Chiba, Chiba Prefecture, to measure the quantity of radioactive rare gases like krypton 85 which could be released through cracks in rock beds at a North Korean underground test site, the officials said.
Liquified rare gases are non- polar; but the focus here is on the processes of their electronic excitation, which have applications in detectors for high-energy physics, and in light sources for the extreme ultraviolet, among others.
Praxair's primary products are atmospheric gases including oxygen, nitrogen, argon and rare gases, as well as process and specialty gases--carbon dioxide, helium, hydrogen, semiconductor process gases, and acetylene.
The effect is created by the reaction of rare gases and electrical impulses to produce a spectacular electrical storm.