rascal


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ras·cal

 (răs′kəl)
n.
1. One that is playfully mischievous.
2. An unscrupulous, dishonest person; a scoundrel.
adj. Archaic
Made up of, belonging to, or relating to the lower classes: "Nor shall the Rascal Rabble here have Peace" (John Dryden).

[Middle English rascaile, rabble, commoners, from Old French rascaille, probably from rasque, mud, from Vulgar Latin *rāsicāre, to scrape; see rash2.]

ras′cal·ly adj.

rascal

(ˈrɑːskəl)
n
1. a disreputable person; villain
2. a mischievous or impish rogue
3. an affectionate or mildly reproving term for a child or old man: you little rascal; the wicked old rascal kissed her.
4. obsolete a person of lowly birth
adj
(prenominal) obsolete
a. belonging to the mob or rabble
b. dishonest; knavish
[C14: from Old French rascaille rabble, perhaps from Old Norman French rasque mud, filth]

ras•cal

(ˈræs kəl)

n.
1. a dishonest or unscrupulous person.
2. a mischievous person or animal.
[1300–50; Middle English rascaile, raskaille < Old French rascaille rabble; perhaps akin to rash2]
syn: See knave.

Rascal

 the rabble collectively; a mob, as of camp followers; ill-conditioned beasts, as deer. See also rascality.
Examples: rascal of boys, 1470; of the city, 1494; of the people, 1561.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rascal - a deceitful and unreliable scoundrelrascal - a deceitful and unreliable scoundrel
scoundrel, villain - a wicked or evil person; someone who does evil deliberately
2.rascal - one who is playfully mischievousrascal - one who is playfully mischievous  
child, kid, minor, nipper, tiddler, youngster, tike, shaver, small fry, nestling, fry, tyke - a young person of either sex; "she writes books for children"; "they're just kids"; "`tiddler' is a British term for youngster"
brat, holy terror, little terror, terror - a very troublesome child

rascal

noun rogue, devil, villain, scoundrel, disgrace, rake, pickle (Brit. informal), imp, scally (Northwest English dialect), wretch, knave (archaic), ne'er-do-well, reprobate, scallywag (informal), good-for-nothing, miscreant, scamp, wastrel, bad egg (old-fashioned informal), blackguard, varmint (informal), rapscallion, caitiff (archaic), wrong 'un (informal) What's that old rascal been telling you?

rascal

noun
One who causes minor trouble or damage:
Informal: cutup.
Translations
نَذْل
uličník
slyngel
csirkefogó
prakkari
blēdispalaidnis
kerataserseriyaramaz kişi

rascal

[ˈrɑːskəl] N (= scoundrel) → granuja mf; (= child) → granuja mf, pillo m

rascal

[ˈrɑːskəl] nvaurien m

rascal

nGauner m; (= child)Schlingel m, → Frechdachs m; (old: = scoundrel) → Schurke m

rascal

[ˈrɑːskl] n (scoundrel) → mascalzone m; (child) → birbante m

rascal

(ˈraːskəl) noun
a cheeky or naughty person, especially a child. a cheeky little rascal.
ˈrascally adjective
References in classic literature ?
Call yourself any names you like, but I am neither a rascal nor a wretch and I don't choose to be called so.
Wick Cutter was different from any other rascal I have ever known, but I have found Mrs.
interrupted Heyward, "it will not do--we must think of some other scheme--and yet, I have much reason to believe the rascal has deceived me.
I am no coward, but what to make of this head-peddling purple rascal altogether passed my comprehension.
Mind your own business, you impudent young rascal, and I'll mind mine
All together, too; none of those chivalrous magnanimities which one reads so much about -- one courtly rascal at a time, and the rest standing by to see fair play.
So they always acquit; and then a MAN goes in the night, with a hundred masked cowards at his back and lynches the rascal.
Dashwood, but if he had done otherwise, I should have thought him a rascal.
I imagined, for a moment, that this piece of eloquence was addressed to me; and, sufficiently enraged, stepped towards the aged rascal with an intention of kicking him out of the door.
If he had any brains in that monkey head of his," she said to herself in the passage, "what a rascal he would be
Sitting in among the wares he dealt in, by a charcoal stove, made of old bricks, was a grey-haired rascal, nearly seventy years of age; who had screened himself from the cold air without, by a frousy curtaining of miscellaneous tatters, hung upon a line; and smoked his pipe in all the luxury of calm retirement.
This part of the business, however, did not last long; for the young rascal, being expert at a variety of feints and dodges, of which my aunt had no conception, soon went whooping away, leaving some deep impressions of his nailed boots in the flower-beds, and taking his donkey in triumph with him.