rat-trap

Related to rat-trap: rat-trap bond

rat-trap

n
1. (Mechanical Engineering) a device for catching rats
2. (Mechanical Engineering) informal a type of bicycle pedal having serrated steel foot pads and a toe clip
Translations

rat-trap

[ˈrætˌtræp] ntrappola per topi
References in classic literature ?
IN the morning we went up to the village and bought a wire rat-trap and fetched it down, and unstopped the best rat-hole, and in about an hour we had fifteen of the bulliest kind of ones; and then we took it and put it in a safe place under Aunt Sally's bed.
No country is so wild and difficult but men will make it a theater of war; concealed in the forest at the bottom of that military rat-trap, in which half a hundred men in possession of the exits might have starved an army to submission, lay five regiments of Federal infantry.
Next you buckle your greaves on your legs, and your cuisses on your thighs; then come your backplate and your breastplate, and you begin to feel crowded; then you hitch onto the breastplate the half-petticoat of broad overlapping bands of steel which hangs down in front but is scolloped out behind so you can sit down, and isn't any real improvement on an inverted coal scuttle, either for looks or for wear, or to wipe your hands on; next you belt on your sword; then you put your stove-pipe joints onto your arms, your iron gauntlets onto your hands, your iron rat-trap onto your head, with a rag of steel web hitched onto it to hang over the back of your neck -- and there you are, snug as a candle in a candle-mould.
The bottom and sides, properly upholstered, formed a bed sufficiently soft to prevent the rolling of the ship turning this kind of cage into a rat-trap.
But above, perched each upon its own stone, tall, gray, and withered, more like dead and dried specimens than actual living creatures, sat the horrible males, absolutely motionless save for the rolling of their red eyes or an occasional snap of their rat-trap beaks as a dragon-fly went past them.
it will be a strange thing if I cannot outshoot that thing of thine, which to my eyes is more like a rat-trap than a bow.
But an exemplary lady named Wilcocks, who had stowed away gold and silver in a pickle-pot in a clock-case, a canister-full of treasure in a hole under her stairs, and a quantity of money in an old rat-trap, revived the interest.
It's not just the adults suffering - children too are caught in this terrible rat-trap.
FIREFIGHTERS were involved in a bizarre rescue when a pigeon stuck in a rat-trap got caught in a tree.
Rat-trap cars fitted with discreet high definition surveillance cameras have already caught scores of thieves.
There is none of the tourist rat-trap hustle and bustle of cities like Florence or Rome here.
But the multiple complexities of brick bonding, from Monk to Rat-trap, are as concisely drawn by Sambrook, whose very clear work will surely be soon copied by other authors as 'after Sambrook in Curl'.