rates


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rate 1

 (rāt)
n.
1. A quantity measured with respect to another measured quantity: a rate of speed of 60 miles an hour.
2. A measure of a part with respect to a whole; a proportion: the mortality rate; a tax rate.
3. The cost per unit of a commodity or service: postal rates.
4. A charge or payment calculated in relation to a particular sum or quantity: interest rates.
5. Level of quality.
6. often rates Chiefly British A locally assessed property tax.
v. rat·ed, rat·ing, rates
v.tr.
1.
a. To place in a particular class, rank, or grade: rated the film PG13; rated the bonds at junk level. See Synonyms at estimate.
b. To specify the performance limits of, especially according to a standard scale: This fuse is rated at 50 amperes. The fishing line is rated for 30 pounds.
2. To regard or consider as having a certain value: rated the movie excellent; rated him a fine cook.
3. Chiefly British To value for purposes of taxation.
4. To set a rate for (goods to be shipped).
5. Informal To merit or deserve: people that rate special treatment; an idea that rates attention. See Synonyms at earn.
v.intr.
1. To be ranked in a particular class: a wine that rates higher than any other.
2. Informal To have status, importance, or influence: Tea-flavored ice cream doesn't rate highly in my book.
Idiom:
at any rate
1. Whatever the case may be; in any case: You should at any rate apologize.
2. Used to indicate a revision or correction to a previous remark: We were delighted, or at any rate satisfied, with the results.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Medieval Latin rata, proportion, short for Latin (prō) ratā (parte), (according to a) fixed (part), from feminine ablative past participle of rērī, to consider, reckon; see ar- in Indo-European roots.]

rate 2

 (rāt)
v. rat·ed, rat·ing, rates Archaic
v.tr.
To berate.
v.intr.
To express reproof.

[Middle English raten, perhaps of Scandinavian origin.]

rates

(reɪts)
pl n
(in some countries) a tax levied on property by a local authority
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rates - a local tax on property (usually used in the plural)rates - a local tax on property (usually used in the plural)
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
revenue enhancement, tax, taxation - charge against a citizen's person or property or activity for the support of government
poor rates - a local tax for the relief of the poor
Translations

rates

[ˈreɪts] npl (Brit) (old) → imposte fpl comunali sugli immobili
References in classic literature ?
That there be two rates of usury: the one free, and general for all; the other under license only, to certain persons, and in certain places of merchandizing.
Most people fancied that a telephone system was practically the same as a gas or electric light system, which can often be duplicated with the result of cheaper rates and better service.
On the absence of intermediate varieties at the present day -- On the nature of extinct intermediate varieties; on their number -- On the vast lapse of time, as inferred from the rate of deposition and of denudation -- On the poorness of our palaeontological collections -- On the intermittence of geological formations -- On the absence of intermediate varieties in any one formation -- On the sudden appearance of groups of species -- On their sudden appearance in the lowest known fossiliferous strata.
Jaggers, bending forward to look at the ground, and then throwing his head back to look at the ceiling, "what do you suppose you are living at the rate of?
At once the birth rate began to rise and the death rate to fall.
But whether because stupidity was just what was needed to run such a salon, or because those who were deceived found pleasure in the deception, at any rate it remained unexposed and Helene Bezukhova's reputation as a lovely and clever woman became so firmly established that she could say the emptiest and stupidest things and everybody would go into raptures over every word of hers and look for a profound meaning in it of which she herself had no conception.
By this time we had got so far out of the run of the current that we kept steerage way even at our necessarily gentle rate of rowing, and I could keep her steady for the goal.
The second was of an opinion directly contrary; "to tax those qualities of body and mind, for which men chiefly value themselves; the rate to be more or less, according to the degrees of excelling; the decision whereof should be left entirely to their own breast.
As far as it would contribute to rendering regulations for the collection of the duties more simple and efficacious, so far it must serve to answer the purposes of making the same rate of duties more productive, and of putting it into the power of the government to increase the rate without prejudice to trade.
Hamilton Fynes had the appearance of a perfectly respectable transatlantic man of business, there was nothing about his personality remarkably striking,--nothing, at any rate, to inspire an unusual amount of respect.
Calculating our rate of progress from the date of our departure, I found that we had just time, and no more, to reach London on the last day of the month.
At any rate, when you watch those live crabs that nestle here on this bonnet, such an idea will be almost sure to occur to you; unless, indeed, your fancy has been fixed by the technical term crown also bestowed upon it; in which case you will take great interest in thinking how this mighty monster is actually a diademed king of the sea, whose green crown has been put together for him in this marvellous manner.