rationing


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Related to rationing: Office of War Information

ra·tion

 (răsh′ən, rā′shən)
n.
1. A fixed portion, especially an amount of food allotted to persons in military service or to civilians in times of scarcity.
2. rations Food issued or available to members of a group.
tr.v. ra·tioned, ra·tion·ing, ra·tions
1. To supply with rations.
2.
a. To distribute as rations: rationed out flour and sugar.
b. To restrict to limited allotments, as during wartime: ration gasoline. See Synonyms at distribute.

[French, from Latin ratiō, ratiōn-, calculation; see ratio.]

rationing

(ˈræʃənɪŋ)
n
(Social Welfare) the process of restricting consumption of certain commodities
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rationing - the act of rationingrationing - the act of rationing; "during the war the government imposed rationing of food and gasoline"
apportioning, apportionment, parceling, parcelling, assignation, allocation, allotment - the act of distributing by allotting or apportioning; distribution according to a plan; "the apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives is based on the relative population of each state"

rationing

noun restriction, control, regulation, limitation The municipal authorities here are preparing for food rationing.
Translations

rationing

[ˈræʃnɪŋ] Nracionamiento m

rationing

[ˈræʃənɪŋ] nrationnement mrat pack n (British)journalistes mpl de la presse à sensationrat poison nmort-aux-rats f invrat race nfoire f d'empoigne

rationing

n (of goods, food)Rationierung f; (by state, government also) → Bewirtschaftung f

rationing

[ˈræʃnɪŋ] nrazionamento
References in periodicals archive ?
FIVE years ago this week, rationing was introduced in Britain.
W] hatever the HMO, there must be rationing and inducement to
According to the new rationing system, each citizen receives EGP 15 of rations or subsidies on basic commodities on his ration card (and EGP 7 extra during the month of Ramadan).
MOST people would associate rationing with the Second World War, but Britain's First World War civilians also had to 'make do.
Early this year, officials announced that 517 cities across the country were facing a severe water shortage and faced the prospect of rationing if the public did not severely reduce consumption.
Many nurses believe care rationing is happening regularly, compromising patient care and contributing to their stress.
TOP British fashion designer Vivienne Westwood once said: "I was born during the war and grew up in a time of rationing.
Food rationing ended in Britain 60 years ago on July 4, 1954 - nine years after the end of the Second World War.
Now, in the middle of massive joblessness and economic downturn, his new book, Any Way You Slice It: The Past, Present and Future of Rationing (The New Press, May, 2013), is based on the assumption that humanity needs to massively reduce consumption if it is to have any chance of surviving.
ANY WAY YOU SLICE IT: THE PAST, PRESENT, AND THE FUTURE OF RATIONING considers the rationing of resources and examines how price-based rationing worldwide has adversely affected communities who find the pipeline of supply and demand controlled by mega-corporations and big business.
POOR diets filled with junk and convenience foods are leading to diets that are worse than during war-time rationing and the return of conditions such as scurvy, experts have warned.
Unlike rationing in most countries, which is intended to keep costs down, rationing in the United States has actually led to increased costs, resulting in the most expensive health-care system in the world.