raunch culture


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raunch culture

n
a culture which promotes overtly sexual representations of women, as through the acceptance of pornography, stripping, nudity in advertising, etc, esp when this is encouraged by women
References in periodicals archive ?
Loaded and it successors made pornographic raunch culture mainstream while young women appropriated raunch culture in the mistaken belief that being sexually objectified was somehow "empowering".
In her essay "Queer Feminist Pigs," Jane Ward, for example, discusses the work of Ariel Levy (author of the book Female Chauvinist Pigs: Women and the Rise of Raunch Culture [2006]).
In this article, Lee Burton, who researches the effects of pornography and raunch culture in both primary and secondary schools, provides information and strategies that empower children aged nine to twelve to become critical of media messages and to be aware that raunch culture is a construction.
The interest in majoritarian discursive regimes determining the boundaries of articulable subjectivities, and especially genders, was also dealt with in Feona Attwood's lively analysis of prevalent discourses variously expressed as pornification, raunch culture, or sexualisation.
One Girls Gone Wild participant is quoted in Levy's Female Chauvinist Pigs: Women and the Rise of Raunch Culture saying, "It's not like we're creating this.
Levy, 197) As Levy proposes, the convergence of raunch culture dynamics and the allure of celebrity have particularly worrying consequences for feminism.
She's written about gender roles, lesbian culture and modern-day feminism in such publications as Vogue and the Washington Post, and in her book Female Chauvinist Pigs: Women and the Rise of Raunch Culture.
Ariel Levy is the author of Female Chauvinist Pigs: Women and the Rise of Raunch Culture.
It's impossible to ignore the mud-flap girl on the cover of Ariel Levy's eye-opening book, Female Chauvinist Pigs: Women and the Rise of Raunch Culture.
Research by University of South Australia academic Lesley-Anne Ey found that raunch culture is rampant among children, who are learning to pout and thrust by watching music videos.
As Ariel Levy explores in Female chauvinist pigs: Women and the rise of raunch culture (2005), the feminist objective of liberation and sexual exploration proved complementary to the sexual revolution of the 1960s and 70s, which claimed to share the intention of liberating sex and desire from traditionally repressive social structures and ideologies.