ravages


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rav·age

 (răv′ĭj)
v. rav·aged, rav·ag·ing, rav·ages
v.tr.
1. To bring heavy destruction on; devastate: A tornado ravaged the town.
2. To pillage; sack: Enemy soldiers ravaged the village.
v.intr.
To wreak destruction.
n.
1. The act or practice of pillaging or destroying: the marauders' ravage of the village.
2.
a. Destruction, damage, or harm: The storm resulted in the ravage of the countryside.
b. ravages Destructive or harmful effects: the ravages of disease.

[French ravager, from Old French, to uproot, from ravir, to ravish; see ravish.]

rav′ag·er n.

ravages

(ˈrævɪdʒɪz)
pl n
the ravages of something the destructive effects of something
Translations

ravages

[ˈrævɪdʒɪz] nplravages mpl
the ravages of time → les ravages du temps
the ravages of war → les ravages de la guerre

ravages

[ˈrævɪdʒɪz] npl (frm) → danni mpl
the ravages of time → le offese or ingiurie del tempo
References in classic literature ?
The serene Teuton found the supper table and was happy, eating steadily through the bill of fare, and dismayed the garcons by the ravages he committed.
An opening was left in the shell, by which it was protected from the soil, for the spirit to communicate with its earthly tenement, when necessary; and the whole was concealed from the instinct, and protected from the ravages of the beasts of prey, with an ingenuity peculiar to the natives.
I never saw such ravages as the children have made here.
He who is the religious advocate of marriage robs whole millions of its sacred influence, and leaves them to the ravages of wholesale pollution.
What ravages I committed on my favourite authors in the course of my interpretation of them, I am not in a condition to say, and should be very unwilling to know; but I had a profound faith in them, and I had, to the best of my belief, a simple, earnest manner of narrating what I did narrate; and these qualities went a long way.
You must guard the tree for nine days and nine nights from the ravages of two wild black wolves, who will try to harm it.
Among these nations the Galles, who first alarmed the world in 1542, have remarkably distinguished themselves by the ravages they have committed, and the terror they have raised in this part of Africa.
You see," said the tall old man, as they entered, "the ravages committed by that dear creature, to whom I devote myself.
Tramps slouched into the recess and struck matches on the panels; children kept shop upon the steps; the schoolboy had tried his knife on the mouldings; and for close on a generation, no one had appeared to drive away these random visitors or to repair their ravages.
The windows were curtainless, and the yellow moonlight, flooding in through the diamond panes, enabled one to see even colours, whilst it softened the wealth of dust which lay over all and disguised in some measure the ravages of time and moth.
It passed gradually from the rich, to whom it was at first exclusively reserved, to the lower classes, and then its ravages could not be arrested.
My parents are putting great pressure upon me, and my son chafes at the ravages the suitors are making upon his estate, for he is now old enough to understand all about it and is perfectly able to look after his own affairs, for heaven has blessed him with an excellent disposition.