reader


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Related to reader: Reader's Digest

read·er

 (rē′dər)
n.
1. A person who reads, especially:
a. A person who regularly reads certain material: a reader of crime novels.
c. A person employed by a publisher to read and evaluate manuscripts.
d. One who corrects printers' proofs; a proofreader.
e. A teaching assistant who reads and grades examination papers.
2. Chiefly British A university teacher, especially one ranking next below a professor.
3.
a. A textbook of reading exercises.
b. An anthology, especially a literary anthology.
4. Any of various devices that read or retrieve data from a storage device or credit card.
5. See e-reader.

reader

(ˈriːdə)
n
1. a person who reads
2. a person who is fond of reading
3. (Education)
a. chiefly Brit at a university, a member of staff having a position between that of a senior lecturer and a professor
b. US a teaching assistant in a faculty who grades papers, examinations, etc, on behalf of a professor
4. (Education)
a. a book that is part of a planned series for those learning to read
b. a standard textbook, esp for foreign-language learning
5. a person who reads aloud in public
6. (Journalism & Publishing) a person who reads and assesses the merit of manuscripts submitted to a publisher
7. (Journalism & Publishing) a person employed to read proofs and indicate errors by comparison with the original copy; proofreader
8. (Anglicanism) short for lay reader
9. (Roman Catholic Church) short for lay reader
10. (Judaism) Judaism chiefly Brit another word for cantor1

read•er

(ˈri dər)

n.
1. one who reads.
2. a schoolbook for instruction in reading.
3. a book of collected writings; anthology.
4.
a. a person employed to evaluate manuscripts for publication, theatrical production, etc.
b. a proofreader.
5. a person authorized to read the lessons, Bible, etc., in a church service.
6. a lecturer or instructor, esp. in some British universities.
7. an assistant to a professor, who grades examinations, papers, etc.
8. a person who interprets tea leaves, dreams, etc., to predict future events.
[before 1000]

reader

A member of the teaching staff at a British university who is senior to a lecturer but junior to a professor.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reader - a person who enjoys readingreader - a person who enjoys reading    
bookworm - someone who spends a great deal of time reading
bookman, scholar, scholarly person, student - a learned person (especially in the humanities); someone who by long study has gained mastery in one or more disciplines
2.reader - someone who contracts to receive and pay for a service or a certain number of issues of a publication
customer, client - someone who pays for goods or services
3.reader - a person who can read; a literate person
decipherer - a reader capable of reading and interpreting illegible or obscure text
literate, literate person - a person who can read and write
map-reader - a person who can read maps; "he is a good map-reader"
skimmer - a rapid superficial reader
4.reader - someone who reads manuscripts and judges their suitability for publication
critic - anyone who expresses a reasoned judgment of something
scanner - someone who scans verse to determine the number and prosodic value of the syllables
5.reader - someone who reads proof in order to find errors and mark corrections
pressman, printer - someone whose occupation is printing
6.reader - someone who reads the lessons in a church service; someone ordained in a minor order of the Roman Catholic Church
clergyman, man of the cloth, reverend - a member of the clergy and a spiritual leader of the Christian Church
Holy Order, Order - (usually plural) the status or rank or office of a Christian clergyman in an ecclesiastical hierarchy; "theologians still disagree over whether `bishop' should or should not be a separate Order"
7.reader - a public lecturer at certain universitiesreader - a public lecturer at certain universities
educator, pedagog, pedagogue - someone who educates young people
8.reader - one of a series of texts for students learning to read
school text, schoolbook, text edition, textbook, text - a book prepared for use in schools or colleges; "his economics textbook is in its tenth edition"; "the professor wrote the text that he assigned students to buy"
McGuffey Eclectic Readers - readers that combined lessons in reading with moralistic messages

reader

noun book lover, bookworm, bibliophile, book reader, book collector Thanks to that job I became an avid reader.
Translations
أحد القُرّاءقارئقَارِئكِتاب قِراءَه
čtenář-kačítanka
læserlæreboglæsebog
lukija
čitateljčitateljicačitalac
olvasóolvasókönyv
lesandilestrarbók
読者
독자
čítankačitateľ
bralecpredavatelj
läsare
ผู้อ่าน
okuyucuokuma kitabıokuyan kimse
độc giả

reader

[ˈriːdəʳ] N
1. (= person who reads) → lector(a) m/f; (in library) → usuario/a m/f
he's a great readerlee mucho, es muy aficionado a la lectura
I'm not much of a readerleo poco, no me interesan mucho los libros
see also lay 3
2. (also publisher's reader) → lector(a) m/f
see also proofreader
3. (Univ) → profesor(a) m/f adjunto/a
4. (= schoolbook) (to teach reading) → libro m de lectura; (= anthology) → antología f
5. (= machine) → máquina f lectora, aparato m lector
see also microfiche, optical

reader

[ˈriːdər] n
[magazine, book, paper] → lecteur/trice m/f
(= book) → livre m de lecture
(British) (at university)maître m de conférences

reader

n
Leser(in) m(f); publisher’s readerLektor(in) m(f)
(Brit Univ) → ˜ Dozent(in) m(f)
(= schoolbook)Lesebuch nt; (to teach reading) → Fibel f; (= foreign language text)Text m, → Lektüre f; (= anthology)Sammelband m; a reader in the Classicseine Klassikersammlung; “first French readerFranzösisches Lesebuch für Anfänger

reader

[ˈriːdəʳ] n
a.lettore/trice
she's a great reader → adora leggere
b. (Brit, ZZZ) (Univ) → (docente m/f) incaricato/a
c. (book) → libro di lettura; (anthology) → antologia

read

(riːd) past tense, past participle read (red) verb
1. to look at and understand (printed or written words or other signs). Have you read this letter?; Can your little girl read yet?; Can anyone here read Chinese?; to read music; I can read (= understand without being told) her thoughts/mind.
2. to learn by reading. I read in the paper today that the government is going to cut taxes again.
3. to read aloud, usually to someone else. I read my daughter a story before she goes to bed; I read to her before she goes to bed.
4. to pass one's time by reading books etc for pleasure etc. I don't have much time to read these days.
5. to study (a subject) at a university etc.
6. to look at or be able to see (something) and get information from it. I can't read the clock without my glasses; The nurse read the thermometer.
7. to be written or worded; to say. His letter reads as follows: `Dear Sir, ...'
8. (of a piece of writing etc) to make a (good, bad etc) impression. This report reads well.
9. (of dials, instruments etc) to show a particular figure, measurement etc. The thermometer reads –5C.
10. to (cause a word, phrase etc to) be replaced by another, eg in a document or manuscript. There is one error on this page – For `two yards', read `two metres'; `Two yards long' should read `two metres long'.
noun
the act, or a period, of reading. I like a good read before I go to sleep.
ˈreadable adjective
(negative unreadable).
1. easy or pleasant to read. I don't usually enjoy poetry but I find these poems very readable.
2. able to be read. Your handwriting is scarcely readable.
ˈreadableness noun
ˌreadaˈbility noun
ˈreader noun
1. a person who reads books, magazines etc. He's a keen reader.
2. a person who reads a particular newspaper, magazine etc. The editor asked readers to write to him with their opinions.
3. a reading-book, especially for children or for learners of a foreign language. a Latin reader.
ˈreadership noun
the (number of) people who read a newspaper, magazine etc.
ˈreading noun
1. the act of reading.
2. the reading of something aloud, as a (public) entertainment. a poetry reading.
3. the ability to read. The boy is good at reading.
4. the figure, measurement etc on a dial, instrument etc. The reading on the thermometer was –5 C.
reading-
1. for the purpose of reading. reading-glasses; a reading-room in a library.
2. for learning to read. a reading-book.
ˈreading material noun
a list of books, stories, articles etc that need to be read for one's studies.
ˈreading matter noun
something written for others to read (eg books, newspapers, letters). There's a lot of interesting reading matter in our local library.
ˈread-outplural ˈread-outs noun
data produced by a computer, eg on magnetic or paper tape.
read between the lines
to look for or find information (eg in a letter) which is not actually stated.
read off
to read from a dial, instrument etc. The engineer read off the temperatures one by one.
read on
to continue to read; to read further. He paused for a few moments, and then read on.
read out
to read aloud. Read out the answers to the questions.
read over/through
to read from beginning to end. I'll read through your manuscript, and let you know if I find any mistakes.

reader

قَارِئ čtenář læser Leser αναγνώστης lector lukija lecteur čitatelj lettore 読者 독자 lezer leser czytelnik leitor читатель läsare ผู้อ่าน okuyucu độc giả 读者

reader

n. lector, lectora.
References in classic literature ?
Miss Kate put up her glass, and, having taken a survey of the little tableau before her, shut her sketch book, saying with condescension, "You've a nice accent and in time will be a clever reader.
Do you think I'm a mind reader to be able to guess?
It is believed that the scene of this tale, and most of the information necessary to understand its allusions, are rendered sufficiently obvious to the reader in the text itself, or in the accompanying notes.
About this time I returned to Kentucke with my family; and here, to avoid an enquiry into my conduct, the reader being before informed of my bringing my family to Kentucke, I am under the necessity of informing him that, during my captivity with the Indians, my wife, who despaired of ever seeing me again, expecting the Indians had put a period to my life, oppressed with the distresses of the country, and bereaved of me, her only happiness, had, before I returned, transported my family and goods, on horses, through the wilderness, amidst a multitude of dangers, to her father's house, in North-Carolina.
Still, there will be a connection with the long past--a reference to forgotten events and personages, and to manners, feelings, and opinions, almost or wholly obsolete --which, if adequately translated to the reader, would serve to illustrate how much of old material goes to make up the freshest novelty of human life.
The first time was three or four years since, when I favoured the reader -- inexcusably, and for no earthly reason that either the indulgent reader or the intrusive author could imagine -- with a description of my way of life in the deep quietude of an Old Manse.
This peculiarity of the whale's eyes is a thing always to be borne in mind in the fishery; and to be remembered by the reader in some subsequent scenes.
The reader, who perhaps has never held much converse in the language of far-off Lithuania, will be glad of the explanation that the place was the rear room of a saloon in that part of Chicago known as "back of the yards.
He would be a poet who could impress the winds and streams into his service, to speak for him; who nailed words to their primitive senses, as farmers drive down stakes in the spring, which the frost has heaved; who derived his words as often as he used them--transplanted them to his page with earth adhering to their roots; whose words were so true and fresh and natural that they would appear to expand like the buds at the approach of spring, though they lay half smothered between two musty leaves in a library--aye, to bloom and bear fruit there, after their kind, annually, for the faithful reader, in sympathy with surrounding Nature.
All tourists MENTION the Rhine legends--in that sort of way which quietly pretends that the mentioner has been familiar with them all his life, and that the reader cannot possibly be ignorant of them--but no tourist ever TELLS them.
My one object in following a new course is to enlarge the range of my studies in the art of writing fiction, and to vary the form in which I make my appeal to the reader, as attractively as I can.
Though I have this bad habit of soliloquising, and indeed am absurd enough to attempt conversation with a house, yet the reader must realise from the beginning that I am still quite a young man.