realism


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re·al·ism

 (rē′ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. An inclination toward literal truth and pragmatism.
2. The representation in art or literature of objects, actions, or social conditions as they actually are, without idealization or presentation in abstract form.
3. Philosophy
a. The scholastic doctrine, opposed to nominalism, that universals exist independently of their being thought.
b. The modern philosophical doctrine, opposed to idealism, that physical objects exist independently of their being perceived.

realism

(ˈrɪəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. awareness or acceptance of the physical universe, events, etc, as they are, as opposed to the abstract or ideal
2. awareness or acceptance of the facts and necessities of life; a practical rather than a moral or dogmatic view of things
3. (Art Terms) a style of painting and sculpture that seeks to represent the familiar or typical in real life, rather than an idealized, formalized, or romantic interpretation of it
4. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) any similar school or style in other arts, esp literature
5. (Philosophy) philosophy the thesis that general terms such as common nouns refer to entities that have a real existence separate from the individuals which fall under them. See also universal11b Compare Platonism, nominalism, conceptualism, naive realism
6. (Philosophy) philosophy the theory that physical objects continue to exist whether they are perceived or not. Compare idealism, phenomenalism
7. (Logic) logic philosophy the theory that the sense of a statement is given by a specification of its truth conditions, or that there is a reality independent of the speaker's conception of it that determines the truth or falsehood of every statement
8. (Philosophy) logic philosophy the theory that the sense of a statement is given by a specification of its truth conditions, or that there is a reality independent of the speaker's conception of it that determines the truth or falsehood of every statement

re•al•ism

(ˈri əˌlɪz əm)

n.
1. interest in or concern for the actual or real, as distinguished from the abstract, speculative, etc.
2. the tendency to view or represent things as they really are.
3. (usu. cap.) a style of painting and sculpture developed about the mid-19th century in which figures and scenes are depicted as they are or might be experienced in everyday life.
4. a style or theory of literature in which familiar aspects of life are represented in a straightforward or plain manner.
5. Philos.
a. the doctrine that universals have a real objective existence. Compare conceptualism (def. 1), nominalism.
b. the doctrine that objects of sense perception have an existence independent of the act of perception. Compare idealism (def. 5).
[1810–20; compare French réalisme]

Realism

1. Naturalism.
2. a movement in the late 19th century stressing common rather than individual characteristics as the basis of reality. Cf. Verism. — Realist, n.
See also: Art
1. the doctrine that universals have a real objective existence. Cf. idealism.
2. the doctrine that objects of sense perception have an existence independent of the act of perception. — realist, n.
See also: Philosophy

realism

1. (c 1830–80) A largely French movement that developed in reaction to idealized and mythical/historical subjects. Courbet is by far the most notable practitioner of the form.
2. A medieval doctrine that universals such as “the good” have real existence.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.realism - the attribute of accepting the facts of life and favoring practicality and literal truth
practicality - concerned with actual use rather than theoretical possibilities
2.realism - the state of being actual or real; "the reality of his situation slowly dawned on him"
actuality - the state of actually existing objectively; "a hope that progressed from possibility to actuality"
fact - an event known to have happened or something known to have existed; "your fears have no basis in fact"; "how much of the story is fact and how much fiction is hard to tell"
3.realism - (philosophy) the philosophical doctrine that physical objects continue to exist when not perceived
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
4.realism - an artistic movement in 19th century France; artists and writers strove for detailed realistic and factual description
art movement, artistic movement - a group of artists who agree on general principles
5.realism - (philosophy) the philosophical doctrine that abstract concepts exist independent of their names
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy

realism

noun
1. pragmatism, common sense, practicality, level-headedness, clear-sightedness It was the time now to show political realism.
2. authenticity, naturalism, verisimilitude, fidelity, faithfulness, truthfulness Sincere performances and gritty Boston settings add to the film's realism
Translations
واقِعِيَّه
realismus
realisme
realismo
realizam
realizmus
raunsæi; raunhyggja
realism
realizmus
realism
gerçekçilik

realism

[ˈrɪəlɪzəm] Nrealismo m

realism

[ˈrɪəlɪzəm] nréalisme m

realism

nRealismus m

realism

[ˈrɪəˌlɪzm] n (also) (Art) → realismo

real

(riəl) adjective
1. which actually exists. There's a real monster in that cave.
2. not imitation; genuine. real leather; Is that diamond real?
3. actual. He may own the factory, but it's his manager who is the real boss.
4. great. a real surprise/problem.
adverb
(especially American) very; really. a real nice house.
ˈrealist noun
a person who sees, or claims to see, life as it is, without being affected by emotion etc.
ˈrealism noun
ˌreaˈlistic adjective
(negative unrealistic).
1. showing things as they really are. a realistic painting.
2. taking a sensible, practical view of life. I'd like to think we'd sell five of these a day, but it would be more realistic to say two.
ˌreaˈlistically adverb
reality (riˈӕləti) noun
1. that which is real and not imaginary. It was a relief to get back to reality after hearing the ghost story.
2. the state of being real.
3. (often in plural reˈalities) a fact. Death and sorrow are two of the grim realities of human existence.
ˈreally adverb
1. in fact. He looks a fool but he is really very clever.
2. very. That's a really nice hat!
interjection
an expression of surprise, protest, doubt etc. `I'm going to be the next manager.' `Oh really?'; Really! You mustn't be so rude!
real estate
(the buying and selling of) land and houses.
for real
(especially American) genuine; true. He says he's got a new bike, but I don't know if that's for real.
in reality
really; actually. He pretends to be busy, but in reality he has very little to do.
References in classic literature ?
There is a feeling about this part of the work which lifts it to the highest altitudes of art; the sense of sordid realism vanishes away--one recognizes that there is SOUL here.
Harper and vanquish her realism with Tom's marvellous dream.
We in our madness have separated the two, and have invented a realism that is vulgar, an ideality that is void.
Paul; and anon, complete his own portrait with one of those touches of pitiless realism which the satirist so often seeks in vain.
The younger poet paints, with the brush of Verestchagin, the realism and horrors of civil war.
We have in our police reports realism pushed to its extreme limits, and yet the result is, it must be confessed, neither fascinating nor artistic.
The girl described the scene later, with all the passionate realism of her race, and, whether or no the policemen had a similar eye for the picturesque, they had at least an eye for the facts of the case, and were compelled to give up the chase and retire from the scene.
She marched cheerfully to the fountain and back, and did a few calculations in realism.
With this spirit of realism which pervades Books IV.
With a fierce delight in his own realism he described the woman who had opened the door for him.
We might have killed them at any distance, but one rule of war we have maintained from the first--the rule of realism.
It follows them from an earlier date and could not easily be changed, and it may serve to recall to an elder generation than this the time when their author was breaking so many lances in the great, forgotten war between Realism and Romanticism that the floor of the "Editor's Study" in Harper's Magazine was strewn with the embattled splinters.