whirlwind

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whirl·wind

 (wûrl′wĭnd′, hwûrl′-)
n.
1. A rapidly rotating, generally vertical column of air, such as a tornado, dust devil, or waterspout.
2.
a. A tumultuous, confused rush.
b. A destructive force or thing.
adj.
Tumultuous or rapid: a whirlwind political campaign.

whirlwind

(ˈwɜːlˌwɪnd)
n
1. (Physical Geography) a column of air whirling around and towards a more or less vertical axis of low pressure, which moves along the land or ocean surface
2.
a. a motion or course resembling this, esp in rapidity
b. (as modifier): a whirlwind romance.
3. an impetuously active person

whirl•wind

(ˈʰwɜrlˌwɪnd, ˈwɜrl-)

n.
1. a relatively small mass of air, as a tornado, rotating rapidly and advancing over land or sea.
2. something resembling a whirlwind, as in destructive force.
3. any circling rush or violent onward course.
adj.
4. like a whirlwind, as in speed or force: a whirlwind visit.
Idioms:
reap the whirlwind, to suffer the penalties for one's misdeeds. Hos. 8:7.
[1300–50; Middle English < Old Norse hvirfilvindr]

whirlwind

any wind that has a spinning motion and is conflned to a small area in the shape of a vertical cylinder.
See also: Wind

Whirlwind

 something rushing; a confused condition.
Examples: whirlwind of applause, 1837; of tempestuous fire, 1667; of horse, 1840; of passion, 1603; of town pleasure, 1855.

whirlwind

An intense area of low pressure moving in a circular motion caused by a convection current that occurs over hot land such as in deserts.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.whirlwind - a more or less vertical column of air whirling around itself as it moves over the surface of the Earthwhirlwind - a more or less vertical column of air whirling around itself as it moves over the surface of the Earth
dust devil - a miniature whirlwind strong enough to whip dust and leaves and litter into the air
windstorm - a storm consisting of violent winds

whirlwind

noun
1. tornado, hurricane, cyclone, typhoon, twister (U.S.), dust devil, waterspout They scattered like leaves in a whirlwind.
2. turmoil, chaos, swirl, mayhem, uproar, maelstrom, welter, bedlam, tumult, hurly-burly, madhouse a whirlwind of frenzied activity
adjective
Translations
زَوْبَعَه، دَوّامَه هَوائِيَّه، إعْصار
hvirvelvind
forgószél
hvirfilvindur

whirlwind

[ˈwɜːlwɪnd]
A. N (lit, fig) → torbellino m
like a whirlwindcomo un torbellino, como una tromba
to reap the whirlwindsegar lo que se ha sembrado, padecer las consecuencias
B. CPD [romance] → apasionado, arrollador
a whirlwind courtshipun noviazgo brevísimo
they took us on a whirlwind tournos llevaron de gira relámpago

whirlwind

hwɜːrlwɪnd]
ntornade f
modif (= very quick) [romance] → éclair inv; [tour] → éclair inv

whirlwind

nWirbelwind m; (fig)Trubel m, → Wirbel m; like a whirlwindwie der Wirbelwind; to reap the whirlwind (prov) → Sturm ernten; he did some very stupid things, and now he’s reaping the whirlwinder hat einige sehr große Dummheiten gemacht und jetzt muss er dafür büßen; a whirlwind romanceeine stürmische Romanze

whirlwind

[ˈwɜːlˌwɪnd]
2. adj (romance) → travolgente

whirl

(wəːl) verb
to move rapidly (round, away etc). She whirled round when I called her name; The wind whirled my hat away before I could grab it.
noun
1. an excited confusion. a whirl of activity; My head's in a whirl – I can't believe it's all happening!
2. a rapid turn.
ˈwhirlpool noun
a circular current in a river or sea, caused by opposing tides, winds or currents.
ˈwhirlwind noun
a violent circular current of wind with a whirling motion.
References in classic literature ?
And the royal master of high latitudes sighs mightily, with the sinking sun upon his breast and the double-edged sword upon his knees, as if wearied by the innumerable centuries of a strenuous rule and saddened by the unchangeable aspect of the ocean under his feet - by the endless vista of future ages where the work of sowing the wind and reaping the whirlwind shall go on and on till his realm of living waters becomes a frozen and motionless ocean.
How true this holds for Iran, which sowed the wind outside its borders and is reaping the whirlwind of public anger at home.
But perhaps the Philippines is merely reaping the whirlwind of its own casual indifference toward learning from its past.
We sowed the wind and are now reaping the whirlwind.
Now he and the unfortunate people of Iraq are reaping the whirlwind.
The next thing he knew he was making his debut at Ibrox and reaping the whirlwind of the re-emergence of the man who had led Rangers to Nine in a Row.
Health chiefs have sown the wind; unfortunately, it's the patients and staff who are now reaping the whirlwind.
We drew breath, but only now are we reaping the whirlwind.
As always with smoking-related illnesses, the wind is sown decades earlier and he was disarmingly frank about reaping the whirlwind so many years later.
The Conservatives are reaping the whirlwind, having sown the wind with the announcement that higher earners are to lose out on child benefit payments.
There cannot be a more terrible example of reaping the whirlwind.