reapportionment


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re·ap·por·tion·ment

 (rē′ə-pôr′shən-mənt)
n.
1. The act of reapportioning or the state of being reapportioned.
2. Redistribution of representation in a legislative body, especially the periodic reallotment of US congressional seats according to changes in the census figures as required by the Constitution.

reapportionment

(ˌriːəˈpɔːʃənmənt)
n
the act of changing how much of something different people deserve or should be given; redistribution

re•ap•por•tion•ment

(ˌri əˈpɔr ʃən mənt, -ˈpoʊr-)

n.
1. the act of redistributing or changing the apportionment of something.
2. the redistribution of representation in a legislative body.
[1930–35]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reapportionment - a new apportionment (especially a new apportionment of congressional seats in the United States on the basis of census results)
apportioning, apportionment, parceling, parcelling, assignation, allocation, allotment - the act of distributing by allotting or apportioning; distribution according to a plan; "the apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives is based on the relative population of each state"
reshuffle - a redistribution of something; "there was a reshuffle of cabinet officers"
U.S.A., United States, United States of America, US, USA, America, the States, U.S. - North American republic containing 50 states - 48 conterminous states in North America plus Alaska in northwest North America and the Hawaiian Islands in the Pacific Ocean; achieved independence in 1776
References in periodicals archive ?
They explore everything from civil rights, succession, reapportionment, prohibition, legal institutions and their evolution, and more, and they provide much food for thought in social issues areas.
Sue the local Board of Elections to enjoin use of any existing reapportionment plan and seek the assistance of a federal three-judge panel to draw a new, interim map.
Thirteen chapters are presented on the design of democratic institutions, the right to participate, reapportionment,, the role of political parties, money and politics, preclearance and the voting rights act, constitutional and legislative approaches to majority rule and minority vote dilution, racial vote dilution under the Voting Rights Act, redistricting and representation, gerrymandering and race, direct democracy, remedial possibilities for defective elections, and alternative democratic structures.
Carr unleashed the Reapportionment Revolution, which was largely driven by litigation in the lower federal courts, with periodic additional guidance by the Court.
Jim Daughton, partner of Bar Chief Legislative Counsel Steve Metz, noted that the two-month early start is because of reapportionment, which in turn leads to the earlier committee sessions.
On the election front, recently passed reapportionment and open primary reforms have the potential lo drastically change California's political landscape in 2012.
The result of reapportionment can't be predicted, and the political character of neighborhoods can shift over time.
ACCORDING TO a post-census study by Americans for Tax Reform, states slated to gain seats in the next reapportionment are distinguished from their slower-growing counterparts in three ways: They have lower taxes, less government spending, and, in most cases, right-to-work laws that weaken unions.
Holmes advises higher education leaders--still reeling from a historic economic slide--to prepare for the eventual loss of traditional allies as Census results trigger the reapportionment of political boundaries.
States will then have time to decide how, for purposes of the legislative reapportionment they'll be starting next year, their prisoners should be counted: where the prisons are, or where the prisoners last resided before incarceration.
Reapportionment will take place after the Bureau releases the 2010 census data by Dec.