fee

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fee

 (fē)
n.
1. A fixed sum charged, as by an institution or by law, for a privilege: a license fee; tuition fees.
2. A charge for professional services: a surgeon's fee.
3. A tip; a gratuity.
4. Law See fee simple.
5.
a. In feudal law, an estate in land granted by a lord to his vassal on condition of homage and service. Also called feud2, fief.
b. The land so held.
tr.v. feed, fee·ing, fees
1. To give a tip to.
2. Scots To hire.

[Middle English fe, from Old English feoh, cattle, goods, money, and from Anglo-Norman fee, fief (from Old French fie, fief, of Germanic origin; akin to Old English feoh); see peku- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]
Word History: Fee comes from Old English feoh, which has three meanings: "cattle, livestock," "goods, possessions, movable property," and "money." The Germanic form behind the Old English is *fehu-, which derives by Grimm's Law from Indo-European *peku-, "movable wealth, cattle." In the ancient societies of Europe and Asia that spoke Indo-European languages, the wealth of a person or group was often measured by the size of their herds—just as it is in many traditional pastoral societies today. So it is natural that a word meaning "cattle" and "movable wealth" could also mean "money," as ancient economies developed and standard coinage of gold and silver was introduced. The same development from "livestock" to "money" can also be observed in the family of Latin words derived from pecu, "cattle," the direct Latin descendant of Indo-European *peku- and cognate of English fee. In Latin, many words relating to money and finance were derived from pecu, and several of these derivatives were ultimately borrowed into English, for example, pecūnia, "money," the source of our word pecuniary. Another was pecūliāris, "relating to one's pecūlium or personal property, particular to oneself," the source of our word peculiar. Finally, our word peculate comes from yet a third derivative, pecūlāre, "to embezzle public money."

fee

(fiː)
n
1. a payment asked by professional people or public servants for their services: a doctor's fee; school fees.
2. a charge made for a privilege: an entrance fee.
3. (Law) property law
a. an interest in land capable of being inherited. See fee simple, fee tail
b. the land held in fee
4. (Historical Terms) (in feudal Europe) the land granted by a lord to his vassal
5. an obsolete word for a gratuity
6. (Law) in fee
a. law (of land) in absolute ownership
b. archaic in complete subjection
vb, fees, feeing or feed
7. rare to give a fee to
8. chiefly Scot to hire for a fee
[C14: from Old French fie, of Germanic origin; see fief]
ˈfeeless adj

fee

(fi)

n., v. feed, fee•ing. n.
1. a sum charged or paid, as for professional services or for a privilege: a doctor's fee; an admission fee.
2. Law.
a. an estate of inheritance, either without limitation to a particular class of heirs (fee simple) or limited to one particular class of heirs (fee tail).
b. (in the Middle Ages) estate lands held of a feudal lord in return for services performed.
c. a territory held in fee.
3. a gratuity; tip.
v.t.
4. to give a gratuity to; tip.
5. Chiefly Scot. to hire; employ.
Idioms:
in fee, in full ownership: an estate held in fee.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Anglo-French; Old French fie, variant of fief fief]
fee′less, adj.

fee


Past participle: feed
Gerund: feeing

Imperative
fee
fee
Present
I fee
you fee
he/she/it fees
we fee
you fee
they fee
Preterite
I feed
you feed
he/she/it feed
we feed
you feed
they feed
Present Continuous
I am feeing
you are feeing
he/she/it is feeing
we are feeing
you are feeing
they are feeing
Present Perfect
I have feed
you have feed
he/she/it has feed
we have feed
you have feed
they have feed
Past Continuous
I was feeing
you were feeing
he/she/it was feeing
we were feeing
you were feeing
they were feeing
Past Perfect
I had feed
you had feed
he/she/it had feed
we had feed
you had feed
they had feed
Future
I will fee
you will fee
he/she/it will fee
we will fee
you will fee
they will fee
Future Perfect
I will have feed
you will have feed
he/she/it will have feed
we will have feed
you will have feed
they will have feed
Future Continuous
I will be feeing
you will be feeing
he/she/it will be feeing
we will be feeing
you will be feeing
they will be feeing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been feeing
you have been feeing
he/she/it has been feeing
we have been feeing
you have been feeing
they have been feeing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been feeing
you will have been feeing
he/she/it will have been feeing
we will have been feeing
you will have been feeing
they will have been feeing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been feeing
you had been feeing
he/she/it had been feeing
we had been feeing
you had been feeing
they had been feeing
Conditional
I would fee
you would fee
he/she/it would fee
we would fee
you would fee
they would fee
Past Conditional
I would have feed
you would have feed
he/she/it would have feed
we would have feed
you would have feed
they would have feed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fee - a fixed charge for a privilege or for professional servicesfee - a fixed charge for a privilege or for professional services
fixed charge, fixed cost, fixed costs - a periodic charge that does not vary with business volume (as insurance or rent or mortgage payments etc.)
anchorage - a fee for anchoring
cellarage - a charge for storing goods in a cellar
commission - a fee for services rendered based on a percentage of an amount received or collected or agreed to be paid (as distinguished from a salary); "he works on commission"
contingency fee - a fee that is payable only if the outcome is successful (as for an attorney's services)
dockage, docking fee - a fee charged for a vessel to use a dock
drop-off charge - a fee added for returning a rented car to a location different from the one where it was rented
finder's fee - a fee that is paid to someone who finds a source of financial backing or to someone who brings people together for business purposes; "the agency got a finder's fee when their candidate was hired as the new CEO"
legal fee - a fee paid for legal service
license fee, license tax, licensing fee - a fee paid to the government for the privilege of being licensed to do something (as selling liquor or practicing medicine)
lighterage - the fee charged for carrying goods in lighters
lockage - a fee charged for passage through a lock in a canal or waterway
mintage - fee paid to a mint by the government for minting a coin
moorage - a fee for mooring
origination fee - a fee charged to a borrower (especially for a mortgage loan) to cover the costs of initiating the loan
pipage - a fee charged for the use of pipes
poundage - a fee charged for the recovery of impounded animals
retainer, consideration - a fee charged in advance to retain the services of someone
seigniorage - charged by a government for coining bullion
toll - a fee levied for the use of roads or bridges (used for maintenance)
truckage - a fee charged for transporting goods by truckage
tuition, tuition fee - a fee paid for instruction (especially for higher education); "tuition and room and board were more than $25,000"
quayage, wharfage - a fee charged for the use of a wharf or quay
2.fee - an interest in land capable of being inherited
stake, interest - (law) a right or legal share of something; a financial involvement with something; "they have interests all over the world"; "a stake in the company's future"
fee simple - a fee without limitation to any class of heirs; they can sell it or give it away
fee tail - a fee limited to a particular line of heirs; they are not free to sell it or give it away
Verb1.fee - give a tip or gratuity to in return for a service, beyond the compensation agreed on; "Remember to tip the waiter"; "fee the steward"
gift, present, give - give as a present; make a gift of; "What will you give her for her birthday?"

fee

noun charge, pay, price, cost, bill, account, payment, wage, reward, hire, salary, compensation, toll, remuneration, recompense, emolument, honorarium, meed (archaic) How much will the solicitor's fee be?

fee

noun
1. A fixed amount of money charged for a privilege or service:
Translations
أُجْرَةرَسْم، أتْعاب، أجْر
poplatekvstupnéhonorář
gebyrhonorarsalærafgift
maksutaksa
pristojba
honorárium
òóknun, gjald
料金
요금
honoraras
atalgojumshonorārsiestāšanās naudamācību maksa
honorárvstupné
članarinahonorarprijavninašolninavstopnina
avgift
ค่าธรรมเนียม
lệ phí

fee

[fiː] N (= professional) → honorarios mpl, emolumentos mpl (Comm) → pago m; (for doctor's visit) → precio m de visita
admission feeprecio m de entrada
entrance/membership feecuota f
course/tuition/school feesmatrícula fsing
what's your fee?¿cuánto cobra Vd?
for a small feepor una pequeña or módica cantidad
see also transfer D

fee

[ˈfiː]
n
(= pay) [agent, model, consultant] → rémunération f; [doctor, lawyer] → honoraires mpl
to earn a fee → percevoir une rémunération
(= charge) (for examination)droits mpl; (for university)frais mpl de scolarité; (for school)frais mpl de scolarité
for a small fee → pour une somme modique
entrance fee (to club)droit m d'inscription; (to museum)droit m d'entrée
membership fee → droit m d'inscription television licence fee

fee

n
Gebühr f; (of doctor, lawyer, artist, tutor)Honorar nt; (of stage performer)Gage f; (of director, administrator etc)Bezüge pl; (= membership fee)Beitrag m; (school) feesSchulgeld nt; on payment of a small feegegen geringe Gebühr
land held in fee simple (Jur) → unbeschränkt vererbbares Land

fee

[fiː] npagamento; (of doctor, lawyer) → onorario, parcella; (entrance fee, membership fee) → quota d'iscrizione
course or tuition fees (Univ) → tasse fpl universitarie
school fees → tasse fpl scolastiche (for examination) → tassa d'esame
for a small fee → per una somma modesta

fee

(fiː) noun
the price paid for work done by a doctor, lawyer etc or for some special service or right. the lawyer's fee; an entrance fee; university fees.

fee

أُجْرَة poplatek gebyr Gebühr αμοιβή honorarios, precio maksu frais pristojba tariffa 料金 요금 kosten gebyr opłata taxa вознаграждение avgift ค่าธรรมเนียม ücret lệ phí

fee

n. honorario, cuota.

fee

n (doctor’s) honorarios
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