reassortment


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reassortment

(ˌriːəˈsɔːtmənt)
n
(Genetics) the formation of a hybrid virus containing parts from the genomes of two distinct viruses in a mixed infection
References in periodicals archive ?
The object of the framework agreement is the reassortment and the complementary supply of official articles of silverware for the table, With (or where appropriate without) monogram "rf", Intended for french diplomatic and consular posts abroad and all the cabinets of the ministry.
We performed molecular dating to estimate the timing of the reassortment events.
The books touch upon various parts of a futuristic world, including the deadly surface of the Earth, where humans succumb to the Reassortment Strain, a synthetic organism created during a century-long war.
The emergence of this dominant H9N2 virus, Liu continued, was the first step in the genesis of the H7N9 viruses because it greatly increased the likelihood of reassortment between H9N2 and other flu subtypes.
These strains which include genes derived by reassortment from human swine and avian viruses have become a major cause of swine influenza in North America.
Further tests based on the tracheal swab samples confirmed reassortment origin of the new virus.
Zhu Huachen, one of the leading authors of the paper, said that H7 viruses probably transferred from ducks to chickens on at least two independent occasions and that reassortment with H9N2 viruses generated the H7N9 outbreak lineage.
Sequence analysis suggested that the virus was a reassortment generated from avian viruses circulating in wild birds and ducks (3).
Of the 581 HA sequences, six swine strains already contain the standard HA mutations necessary for human adaptation, and are thus capable of entering the human population either directly or via genetic reassortment, Sasisekharan said.
Polymerase chain reaction analysis (PCR) will be used to determine the absence of recombination or reassortment to test our hypothesis that y-irradiation is able to produce viruses that can induce livevirus-like immunological responses, remain transcriptionally active but unable to undergo replication or recombination.
Two swine origin influenza A (H3N2) virus strains that triggered febrile respiratory illness in two children this summer contain genetic material from the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus--a genetic reassortment that hasn't been seen before, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
This process is called reassortment, and this computer-based networking model is a novel way to see how it all happened in influenza over time; the researchers analyzed the relationship among the genomes of more than 5,000 strains of influenza A that had been isolated over several decades and recently sequenced.