rebbetzin


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rebbetzin

(ˈrɛbətsɪn)
n
(Judaism) Judaism the wife of a rabbi
[from Yiddish]
References in periodicals archive ?
Continue reading "How Rebbetzin Chaya Mushka Schneerson Became an Icon of the Chabad Movement" at.
Rebbetzin Nechamah Hendel, the young wife of Athens' Chabad rabbi Mendel Hendel, thinks there is not much economic future for the Jewish community in Greece and notes that a neo-Nazi party has won 7 percent of the seats in the Greek parliament.
As a final note, the reporter added that, "Dr Vidaver had the ring stored away, but the rebbetzin, bless her soul, she is fond of diamonds, and will eucher [sic] the doctor out of it, you may be sure.
Rebbetzin Esti Reisman spoke with sensitivity and authenticity about her experiences in caring for an elderly loved one, and shared how precious this experience is: "It is not a burden, but rather a privilege
How the match between the Rebbe and Rabbi Yosef Yitzchak's middle daughter, Rebbetzin Chaya Mushka, came about.
Police is looking into a possible connection between Schlissel and a rebbetzin (a rabbi's wife) from Jerusalem, who is a prominent, vocal critic of the pride parade.
See Shuly Rubin Schwartz, The Rabbi's Wife: The Rebbetzin in American Jewish Life (New York: New York University Press, 2006); and Pamela S.
It takes Sahzman's pushing all the wrong women to wake Leo Finkle up to the fact that he needs love more than he needs the perfect rebbetzin.
Beginning in late 1964, after the passing of his mother, Rebbetzin Chana, the Rebbe began dedicating a segment of his weekly Shabbat public gatherings to the study of Rashi's classic biblical commentary.
CDATA[ The Kupat Hai'r organization sets up a fund to continue the works of loving kindness of Rebbetzin Batsheva Kanievsky z"l.
When it does show up, the narrative inevitable ends with the death of the lovers, as in "Smoke," or "The Rabbi and the Rebbetzin," about the life of a childless and loving couple in the shtetl.
The rabbi and his wife (the rebbetzin in Yiddish) were two of the most important fixtures in any Jewish community.