rebel


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

re·bel

 (rĭ-bĕl′)
intr.v. re·belled, re·bel·ling, re·bels
1. To refuse allegiance to and oppose by force an established government or ruling authority.
2. To resist or defy an authority or a generally accepted convention.
3. To feel or express strong unwillingness or repugnance: She rebelled at the unwelcome suggestion.
n. reb·el (rĕb′əl)
1. One who rebels or is in rebellion.
2. Rebel A Confederate soldier.
3. A person who resists or defies authority or convention: "In her own mind, Jan is ... a rebel, an iconoclast, a strange and estranged and angry freedom fighter" (Perri Klass).

[Middle English rebellen, from Old French rebeller, from Latin rebellāre : re-, re- + bellāre, to make war (from bellum, war). N., Middle English, rebellious, rebel, from Old French rebelle, from Latin rebellis, from rebellāre.]

rebel

vb, -bels, -belling or -belled
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) to resist or rise up against a government or other authority, esp by force of arms
2. to dissent from an accepted moral code or convention of behaviour, dress, etc
3. to show repugnance (towards)
n
4.
a. a person who rebels
b. (as modifier): a rebel soldier; a rebel leader.
5. a person who dissents from some accepted moral code or convention of behaviour, dress, etc
[C13: from Old French rebelle, from Latin rebellis insurgent, from re- + bellum war]
ˈrebeldom n

reb•el

(n., adj. ˈrɛb əl; v. rɪˈbɛl)

n., adj., v. -belled, -bel•ling. n.
1. a person who refuses allegiance to, resists, or rises in arms against a government or ruler.
2. a person who resists any authority, control, or tradition.
3. (usu. cap.) a Confederate soldier: used chiefly by Northerners.
adj.
4. rebellious; defiant.
5. of or pertaining to rebels.
v.i.
6. to act as a rebel.
7. to show or feel utter repugnance.
re•bel
[1250–1300; < Old French rebelle < Latin rebellis renewing a war =re- re- + -bellis, adj. derivative of bellum war]

rebel


Past participle: rebelled
Gerund: rebelling

Imperative
rebel
rebel
Present
I rebel
you rebel
he/she/it rebels
we rebel
you rebel
they rebel
Preterite
I rebelled
you rebelled
he/she/it rebelled
we rebelled
you rebelled
they rebelled
Present Continuous
I am rebelling
you are rebelling
he/she/it is rebelling
we are rebelling
you are rebelling
they are rebelling
Present Perfect
I have rebelled
you have rebelled
he/she/it has rebelled
we have rebelled
you have rebelled
they have rebelled
Past Continuous
I was rebelling
you were rebelling
he/she/it was rebelling
we were rebelling
you were rebelling
they were rebelling
Past Perfect
I had rebelled
you had rebelled
he/she/it had rebelled
we had rebelled
you had rebelled
they had rebelled
Future
I will rebel
you will rebel
he/she/it will rebel
we will rebel
you will rebel
they will rebel
Future Perfect
I will have rebelled
you will have rebelled
he/she/it will have rebelled
we will have rebelled
you will have rebelled
they will have rebelled
Future Continuous
I will be rebelling
you will be rebelling
he/she/it will be rebelling
we will be rebelling
you will be rebelling
they will be rebelling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been rebelling
you have been rebelling
he/she/it has been rebelling
we have been rebelling
you have been rebelling
they have been rebelling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been rebelling
you will have been rebelling
he/she/it will have been rebelling
we will have been rebelling
you will have been rebelling
they will have been rebelling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been rebelling
you had been rebelling
he/she/it had been rebelling
we had been rebelling
you had been rebelling
they had been rebelling
Conditional
I would rebel
you would rebel
he/she/it would rebel
we would rebel
you would rebel
they would rebel
Past Conditional
I would have rebelled
you would have rebelled
he/she/it would have rebelled
we would have rebelled
you would have rebelled
they would have rebelled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rebel - `Johnny' was applied as a nickname for Confederate soldiers by the Federal soldiers in the American Civil WarRebel - `Johnny' was applied as a nickname for Confederate soldiers by the Federal soldiers in the American Civil War; `greyback' derived from their grey Confederate uniforms
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
Confederate soldier - a soldier in the Army of the Confederacy during the American Civil War
2.rebel - a person who takes part in an armed rebellion against the constituted authority (especially in the hope of improving conditions)rebel - a person who takes part in an armed rebellion against the constituted authority (especially in the hope of improving conditions)
mutineer - someone who is openly rebellious and refuses to obey authorities (especially seamen or soldiers)
crusader, meliorist, reformer, reformist, social reformer - a disputant who advocates reform
revolutionary, revolutionist, subversive, subverter - a radical supporter of political or social revolution
Young Turk - a member of one or more of the insurgent groups in Turkey in the late 19th century who rebelled against the absolutism of Ottoman rule
3.rebel - someone who exhibits great independence in thought and action
recusant, nonconformist - someone who refuses to conform to established standards of conduct
Verb1.rebel - take part in a rebellionrebel - take part in a rebellion; renounce a former allegiance
dissent, protest, resist - express opposition through action or words; "dissent to the laws of the country"
revolt - make revolution; "The people revolted when bread prices tripled again"
mutiny - engage in a mutiny against an authority
2.rebel - break with established customs
dissent, protest, resist - express opposition through action or words; "dissent to the laws of the country"

rebel

noun
1. revolutionary, resistance fighter, insurgent, secessionist, mutineer, insurrectionary, revolutionist fighting between rebels and government forces
2. nonconformist, dissident, maverick, dissenter, heretic, apostate, schismatic She had been a rebel at school.
verb
1. revolt, resist, rise up, mutiny, take to the streets, take up arms, man the barricades Poverty-stricken citizens could rise up and rebel.
2. defy, dissent, disobey, come out against, refuse to obey, dig your heels in (informal) The child who rebels against his parents is unlikely to be overlooked.
3. recoil, shrink, shy away, flinch, show repugnance His free spirit rebelled at this demand.
adjective
1. rebellious, revolutionary, insurgent, mutinous, insubordinate, insurrectionary Many soldiers in this rebel platoon joined as teenagers.
Quotations
"What is a rebel? A man who says no" [Albert Camus The Rebel]
"To be a rebel is not to be a revolutionary. It is more often but a way of spinning one's wheels deeper in the sand" [Kate Millett Sexual Politics]
"No one can go on being a rebel too long without turning into an autocrat" [Lawrence Durrell Balthazar]

rebel

verb
To refuse allegiance to and oppose by force a government or ruling authority:
noun
Translations
ثائِر، مُتَمَرِّدمُتَمَرِّد، عاصٍيَثور، يَتَمَرَّد على
povstalecrebelbouřit seodbojník
gøre oprøroprørerrebel
kapinallinenkapinoida
bunitipobunitipobunjenicapobunjenik
gera uppreisnuppreisnarmaîur
反逆する反逆者
rebellare
maištautimaištingumassukilimassukilti
dumpinieksdumpotiesnemiernieksnemiernieku-sacelties
upornikuporniškiupreti se
rebell
asiisyan etmekisyancıisyankâr

rebel

[ˈrebl]
A. Nrebelde mf
I was a bit of a rebel at schoolera un poco rebelde en el colegio
B. [rɪˈbel] VI (= rise up) → rebelarse, sublevarse; (= refuse to conform) → rebelarse
to rebel against sth/sbrebelarse contra algo/algn
at the sight of all that food, his stomach rebelledsu estómago se rebeló al ver tanta comida
I tried to get up but my legs rebelledintenté levantarme pero mis piernas se negaron or no me respondieron las piernas
C. ADJ [forces, soldiers, factions] → rebelde
D. CPD rebel leader Ncabecilla mf

rebel

[ˈrɛbəl]
n
(against society, upbringing, one's parents)rebelle mf
(MILITARY) (in uprising) (= insurgent) → rebelle mf
(POLITICS)dissident(e) m/f
[rɪˈbɛl] vi
(gen) [child, teenager] → se rebeller, se révolter
to rebel against sb/sth [+ family, parents, upbringing, system, authority] → se rebeller contre qn/qch, se révolter contre qn/qch
(MILITARY) (= rise up) → se rebeller, se révolter
to rebel against sb/sth [+ dictatorship, occupying power] → se rebeller contre qn/qch, se révolter contre qn/qch
(POLITICS)se rebeller, se révolter
to rebel against sb/sth [+ government, party line, bill] → se rebeller contre qn/qch, se révolter contre qn/qch
modif [ˈrɛbəl] [forces, army, group] → rebelle; [attack] → mené(e) par les rebelles; [stronghold, camp, base] → de rebelles; [commander, leader] → des rebelles

rebel

nRebell(in) m(f), → Aufrührer(in) m(f); (by nature) → Rebell(in) m(f)
adj attrrebellisch; forces, troops alsoaufständisch
virebellieren; (troops, forces also)sich erheben

rebel

[adj, n ˈrɛbl; vb rɪˈbɛl]
1. adj & nribelle (m/f)
2. vi to rebel (against sb/sth)ribellarsi (a qn/contro qc)

rebel

(ˈrebl) noun
1. a person who opposes or fights against people in authority, eg a government. The rebels killed many soldiers; (also adjective) rebel troops.
2. a person who does not accept the rules of normal behaviour etc. My son is a bit of a rebel.
(rəˈbel) verb past tense, past participle reˈbelled
to fight (against people in authority). The people rebelled against the dictator; Teenagers often rebel against their parents' way of life.
rebellion (rəˈbeljən) noun
1. an open or armed fight against a government etc.
2. a refusal to obey orders or to accept rules etc.
rebellious (rəˈbeljəs) adjective
rebelling or likely to rebel. rebellious troops/children.
reˈbelliously adverb
reˈbelliousness noun

rebel

n. rebelde.
References in classic literature ?
I'll try and be what he loves to call me, `a little woman' and not be rough and wild, but do my duty here instead of wanting to be somewhere else," said Jo, thinking that keeping her temper at home was a much harder task than facing a rebel or two down South.
In other words, when a sixth of the population of a nation which has undertaken to be the refuge of liberty are slaves, and a whole country is unjustly overrun and conquered by a foreign army, and subjected to military law, I think that it is not too soon for honest men to rebel and revolutionize.
The fact is, I was a trifle beside myself; or rather OUT of myself, as the French would say: I was conscious that a moment's mutiny had already rendered me liable to strange penalties, and, like any other rebel slave, I felt resolved, in my desperation, to go all lengths.
and I are going to rebel - we took our initiatory step this evening.
Spenlow seemed to think, if he thought anything about the matter, that my aunt was the leader of the state party in our family, and that there was a rebel party commanded by somebody else - so I gathered at least from what he said, while we were waiting for Mr.
Th' infernal Serpent; he it was, whose guile Stird up with Envy and Revenge, deceiv'd The Mother of Mankinde, what time his Pride Had cast him out from Heav'n, with all his Host Of Rebel Angels, by whose aid aspiring To set himself in Glory above his Peers, He trusted to have equal'd the most High, If he oppos'd; and with ambitious aim Against the Throne and Monarchy of God Rais'd impious War in Heav'n and Battel proud With vain attempt.
He returns, in fine, to punish as a rebel every adherent of his brother Prince John.
He prospered enormously, but the work men were no better off than at first, and they dared not rebel and demand more of the money they had made, for there were always plenty of starving wretches outside willing to take their places on the old terms.
When that high spirit, that morning star of evil, fell from heaven, it was as a rebel that he fell.
But the English lawyers had decided that Parliament was omnipotent--and Parliament, in its omnipotence, instead of trial by jury and the Habeas Corpus, enacted admiralty courts in England to try Americans for offences charged against them as committed in America; instead of the privileges of Magna Charta, nullified the charter itself of Massachusetts Bay; shut up the port of Boston; sent armies and navies to keep the peace and teach the colonies that John Hampden was a rebel and Algernon Sidney a traitor.
Yet in that interval he had reviewed a great field of possibilities both past and future; whether it was possible he had not been perfectly wise in his treatment of John; whether it was possible that John was innocent; whether, if he turned John out a second time, as his outraged authority suggested, it was possible to avoid a scandal; and whether, if he went to that extremity, it was possible that Alexander might rebel.
For six years he kept his post; then trouble in the shape of rebel hordes burst once more upon the province, and again he became an exile.