rebloom

rebloom

(riːˈbluːm)
vb (intr)
(of a plant or flower) to bloom again
References in periodicals archive ?
They are long-lived and will rebloom and sometimes last for years.
They bloom for quite some time, and can even be kept over the course of the year to rebloom the following Christmas season.
Though this precise day is irretrievably gone at its end, there will be a new one tomorrow; though this discrete rose, once withered, cannot rebloom, another one can; though each life is unique and linear, the role that one plays can always be recast, and the play can always be replayed.
Forgoing the usual winter pruning on these particular roses allows them to bloom more in the spring and encourages a rebloom in several weeks -- perhaps even a couple of more times during the year.
By selecting plants for the container that rebloom, such as the Mini Penny Hydrangea (http://www.
Pink echeveria will naturally rebloom the following June.
DeadheadingAuPruning blooms or entire flowering stems as soon as a flower fades, helping the plant to rebloom or produce more foliage.
Lilacs, known for their heavy fragrances and rich, hyacinth-like inflorescences in pink, lilac or blue, will occasionally rebloom in the late fall or early winter, especially those types such as 'California Rose' that grow in warm winter climates such as ours.
Although the plants are tender perennials, getting them to rebloom takes a strict regimen--14 hours of complete darkness every night and up to 10 hours of day-light every day for 10 weeks (starting in early October).
If it should stop flowering, cut it back by half and wait for rebloom.
These hearty beauties bloom early in the season and rebloom up to two times in certain USDA Zones.
What you may not know about California poppies is that they have the capacity to rebloom if their spent flowers are removed in a timely manner.