rebook


Related to rebook: puma, Nike, Redbook, Adidas

re·book

 (rē-bo͝ok′)
v. re·booked, re·book·ing, re·books
v.tr.
1. To book again.
2. To change a booking for (a performance or reservation).
v.intr.
To make a new booking: rebooked on another airline.

rebook

(riːˈbʊk)
vb
to book (tickets, a journey, etc) again
References in periodicals archive ?
Passengers also have the option to rebook to the flight date of their choice within 30 days from their original schedule, with rebooking and penalty charges waived.
Delays and cancellations struck for a second successive day, as passengers complained of long waits to rebook seats.
Sales of an insurance product that allows travellers to rebook when their flight is hit by strike action have jumped by 10% in the last 10 days, according to one travel insurance provider.
If your flight is delayed or cancelled for problems beyond anyone's control, like weather or safety issues, most airlines will rebook you on the next available flight at no charge.
14 through February 25, 2013, to voluntarily rebook their flights.
Until now, airlines have had discretion over whether to grant a refund or rebook passengers.
Passengers booked on flight BA2203 on 27 October 2011 may either rebook onto another British Airways flight at no extra cost, subject to availability or cancel the booking and obtain a refund in the original form of payment.
A spokesperson of Etihad said the passengers who have booked tickets for travelling to or from New York on these two days may rebook on alternative flights from Monday when operations are expected to resume.
BA in Cyprus said yesterday it would refund or rebook tickets if the strike goes ahead.
After their release, the imams returned to the terminal and called US Airways to rebook their return to Phoenix.
The airline said it would allow customers to claim a full refund, rebook on a later date or be rebooked by BA with another airline.