recede


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Related to recede: Receding gums

re·cede 1

 (rĭ-sēd′)
intr.v. re·ced·ed, re·ced·ing, re·cedes
1. To move back or away from a limit, point, or mark: waited for the floodwaters to recede.
2. To slope away from a point of reference: a man with a chin that recedes.
3. To become or seem to become more distant and fainter or less distinct: Eventually, my unhappy memories of the place receded.
4. To decrease or diminish: Fuel prices will recede after the holiday.

[Middle English receden, from Old French receder, from Latin recēdere : re-, re- + cēdere, to go; see ked- in Indo-European roots.]
Synonyms: recede1, ebb, retract, retreat
These verbs mean to move backward or away from a limit or position: a glacier that has receded; waters that ebb at low tide; a turtle that retracted into its shell; an army that retreated to avoid defeat.
Antonym: advance

re·cede 2

 (rē-sēd′)
tr.v. re·ced·ed, re·ced·ing, re·cedes
To yield or grant to one formerly in possession; cede (something) back.

[re- + cede.]

recede

(rɪˈsiːd)
vb (intr)
1. to withdraw from a point or limit; go back: the tide receded.
2. to become more distant: hopes of rescue receded.
3. to slope backwards: apes have receding foreheads.
4. (Hairdressing & Grooming)
a. (of a man's hair) to cease to grow at the temples and above the forehead
b. (of a man) to start to go bald in this way
5. to decline in value or character
6. (usually foll by from) to draw back or retreat, as from a promise
[C15: from Latin recēdere to go back, from re- + cēdere to yield, cede]

re•cede1

(rɪˈsid)

v.i. -ced•ed, -ced•ing.
1. to go back to a more distant point; retreat; withdraw.
2. to become or seem to become more distant.
3. to slope backward: a chin that recedes.
[1470–80; < Latin recēdere to go, fall back =re- re- + cēdere; see cede]

re•cede2

(riˈsid)

v.t. -ced•ed, -ced•ing.
to cede back; give to a former possessor.
[1765–75]

recede


Past participle: receded
Gerund: receding

Imperative
recede
recede
Present
I recede
you recede
he/she/it recedes
we recede
you recede
they recede
Preterite
I receded
you receded
he/she/it receded
we receded
you receded
they receded
Present Continuous
I am receding
you are receding
he/she/it is receding
we are receding
you are receding
they are receding
Present Perfect
I have receded
you have receded
he/she/it has receded
we have receded
you have receded
they have receded
Past Continuous
I was receding
you were receding
he/she/it was receding
we were receding
you were receding
they were receding
Past Perfect
I had receded
you had receded
he/she/it had receded
we had receded
you had receded
they had receded
Future
I will recede
you will recede
he/she/it will recede
we will recede
you will recede
they will recede
Future Perfect
I will have receded
you will have receded
he/she/it will have receded
we will have receded
you will have receded
they will have receded
Future Continuous
I will be receding
you will be receding
he/she/it will be receding
we will be receding
you will be receding
they will be receding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been receding
you have been receding
he/she/it has been receding
we have been receding
you have been receding
they have been receding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been receding
you will have been receding
he/she/it will have been receding
we will have been receding
you will have been receding
they will have been receding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been receding
you had been receding
he/she/it had been receding
we had been receding
you had been receding
they had been receding
Conditional
I would recede
you would recede
he/she/it would recede
we would recede
you would recede
they would recede
Past Conditional
I would have receded
you would have receded
he/she/it would have receded
we would have receded
you would have receded
they would have receded
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.recede - pull back or move away or backward; "The enemy withdrew"; "The limo pulled away from the curb"
back away, crawfish, crawfish out, pull in one's horns, back out, retreat, pull back, withdraw - make a retreat from an earlier commitment or activity; "We'll have to crawfish out from meeting with him"; "He backed out of his earlier promise"; "The aggressive investment company pulled in its horns"
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
fall back - move back and away from; "The enemy fell back"
retreat, retrograde - move back; "The glacier retrogrades"
back down, back off, back up - move backwards from a certain position; "The bully had to back down"
advance, march on, move on, progress, pass on, go on - move forward, also in the metaphorical sense; "Time marches on"
2.recede - retreat
retrogress, regress, retrograde - get worse or fall back to a previous condition
3.recede - become faint or more distant; "the unhappy memories of her childhood receded as she grew older"
change - undergo a change; become different in essence; losing one's or its original nature; "She changed completely as she grew older"; "The weather changed last night"
ebb - fall away or decline; "The patient's strength ebbed away"

recede

verb
2. lessen, decline, subside, abate, sink, fade, shrink, diminish, dwindle, wane, ebb The illness began to recede.

recede

verb
To move back or away from a point, limit, or mark:
Translations
يَتَراجَع، يَبْتَعِد الى الوَراءيَنْحَسِر
ustoupitvzdalovat se
forsvindefortone sig
eltávolodik
fjarlægjasthopa, færast aftur, réna
tolti
atkāptiesattālināties
vzďaľovať sa
geri çekilmekuzaklaşmak

recede

[rɪˈsiːd] VI [tide, flood] → bajar; [person etc] → volverse atrás; [view] → alejarse; [danger] → disminuir; [chin] → retroceder
his hair is recedingtiene entradas

recede

[rɪˈsiːd] vi
(= move away) [floods, waters, tide] → se retirer; [person, vehicle] → s'éloigner
His footsteps receded into the night → Le bruit de ses pas s'éloigna dans la nuit.
[hopes, prospects, ambitions] → s'amenuiser; [problem, danger, threat] → s'estomper; [tensions] → diminuer; [pain] → s'atténuer
[hair]
His hair is receding → Son front se dégarnit.

recede

vi
(tide)zurückgehen; (fig)sich entfernen; (hope)schwinden; to recede into the distancein der Ferne verschwinden; all hope is recedingjegliche Hoffnung schwindet
if untreated, the gums recedeohne Behandlung bildet sich das Zahnfleisch zurück; his forehead recedes a biter hat eine leicht fliehende Stirn; his hair is recedinger hat eine leichte Stirnglatze ? also receding
(price)zurückgehen
to recede from (opinion, view etc)abgehen von, aufgeben

recede

[rɪˈsiːd] vi (tide, flood) → abbassarsi; (view) → allontanarsi; (danger, threat) → diminuire

recede

(riˈsiːd) verb
1. to go or move back. When the rain stopped, the floods receded; His hair is receding from his forehead.
2. to become distant. The coast receded behind us as we sailed away.

recede

v. disminuir, [water] bajar, retroceder.
References in classic literature ?
Presently the door commenced to recede before me until it had sunk into the wall fifty feet, then it stopped and slid easily to the left, exposing a short, narrow corridor of concrete, at the further end of which was another door, similar in every respect to the one I had just passed.
I shall see a straight line DAE, in which the middle point (A) will be very bright because it is nearest to me; but on either side the line will shade away RAPIDLY INTO DIMNESS, because the sides AC and AB RECEDE RAPIDLY INTO THE FOG and what appear to me as the Merchant's extremities, viz.
On the other hand in the case of (2) the Physician, though I shall here also see a line (D'A'E') with a bright centre (A'), yet it will shade away LESS RAPIDLY into dimness, because the sides(A'C', A'B') RECEDE LESS RAPIDLY INTO THE FOG: and what appear to me the Physician's extremities, viz.
In proportion as we recede from the earth the action of gravitation diminishes in the inverse ratio of the square of the distance; that is to say,
the consequence, therefore, is, that at certain times it approaches nearer to, and at others it recedes farther from, the earth; in astronomical language, it is at one time in
As the paddle-wheels began to turn, and wharves and shipping to recede through the veil of heat, it seemed to Archer that everything in the old familiar world of habit was receding also.
But, though expressing regret for my momentary loss of self-control, I cannot recede from the position I have taken up as regards the essential unfitness of Clarence's presence in the home.
At the crotch or junction, these flukes slightly overlap, then sideways recede from each other like wings, leaving a wide vacancy between.
Having suspected from the first that there was a gentleman in the background, it is highly satisfactory to know that he recedes into the remote perspective of Asia.
By: Egypt Today staff CAIRO -- 2 November 2017: Doctors Without Borders (DWB), a non-governmental organization, decided to shut down most of the cholera clinics in Yemen, claiming that the disease started to recede, BBC reported.
It is to note that the temperature starts to recede gradually in the evening with rainfall.
Summary: Hot winds that blew through Lebanon and caused forest fires across the country will considerably recede Wednesday and temperatures are expected to drop, meteorologists told The Daily Star.