recency effect


Also found in: Medical.

recency effect

(ˈriːsənsɪ)
n
(Psychology) psychol the phenomenon that when people are asked to recall in any order the items on a list, those that come at the end of the list are more likely to be recalled than the others
References in periodicals archive ?
Next the recency effect will be employed in order to demonstrate how the novel's pornographic elements become fused with its horrific elements.
The tendency to remember an item in the first position within a sequence is the primacy effect, and the tendency to remember an item in last position is the recency effect (Biswas, Grewal, & Roggeveen, 2010; Gurhan-Canli, 2003; Murphy, Hofacker, & Mizerski, 2006).
The recency effect always comes into play in this sort of debate and I was one of the doubters who were never able to proclaim Frankel the best Flat horse ever, but I have never seen anything like Sprinter Sacre over two miles.
The Recency effect demonstrates that we also usually remember the information at the end of a learning experience.
There is very little in the literature on the role of the order effect, recency effect or primacy effect on the performance of accounting students.
Finally, we discovered through randomized survey experiments that women who received contextual risk information were impervious to the recency effect.
Because positive response options appear last on the HCAHPS survey, the positive telephone and active IVR effects may in part represent a cognitive effect known as the recency effect, meaning a tendency to pick the last option within a list with an auditory rather than visual presentation (Baddeley and Hitch 1977).
Third, a recency effect revealed that participants remembered significantly more phrases from the second story versus first story heard, F(1,14) = 6.
As far as the recency effect (a tendency to transfer more from the foreign language actively used by the speaker) is concerned, it was proven a significant factor e.
With the recency effect, employees are judged on what they did last week instead of last year or last quarter.
In direct opposition is the "contrast effect" theory which predicts an increase in the impact of later-presented information that is inconsistent with beliefs, resulting in a recency effect (Einhorn and Hogarth 1985a, 1987; Hogarth and Einhorn 1992).
A recency effect is predicted if the delay occurs between the first message and the simultaneous pairing of the second message with effect measurement.