reciprocative


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re·cip·ro·cate

 (rĭ-sĭp′rə-kāt′)
v. re·cip·ro·cat·ed, re·cip·ro·cat·ing, re·cip·ro·cates
v.tr.
1. To give or take mutually; interchange: The friends reciprocated favors.
2. To show, feel, or give in response or return: They opened their hearts to her, and she reciprocated their affection.
v.intr.
1. To give and take something mutually.
2. To make a return for something given or done.
3. To move back and forth alternately: a power saw that reciprocates.

[Latin reciprocāre, reciprocāt-, to move back and forth, from reciprocus, alternating; see reciprocal.]

re·cip′ro·ca′tive adj.
re·cip′ro·ca′tor n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.reciprocative - given or done or owed to each other
reciprocal, mutual - concerning each of two or more persons or things; especially given or done in return; "reciprocal aid"; "reciprocal trade"; "mutual respect"; "reciprocal privileges at other clubs"
2.reciprocative - moving alternately backward and forward
reciprocal, mutual - concerning each of two or more persons or things; especially given or done in return; "reciprocal aid"; "reciprocal trade"; "mutual respect"; "reciprocal privileges at other clubs"

reciprocative

adjective
Having the same relationship each to the other:
References in periodicals archive ?
During this exercise, he was also able to develop a strong emotional connection with a large number of BBC staff in a reciprocative manner.
Among these definitions, there is one that can be used as a reference point for understanding trust, provided by Dasgupta [17]: "Trust is a belief an agent has that the other party will do what it says it will (being honest and reliable) or reciprocate (being reciprocative for the common good of both), given an opportunity to defect to get higher payoffs.
It stands between choice and action, making a reciprocative causal triad.