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Related to reciprocity: Reciprocity law, Reciprocity theorem


n. pl. rec·i·proc·i·ties
1. A reciprocal condition or relationship.
2. A mutual or cooperative interchange of favors or privileges, especially the exchange of rights or privileges of trade between nations.


n, pl -ities
1. reciprocal action or relation
2. a mutual exchange of commercial or other privileges
[C18: via French from Latin reciprocus reciprocal]


(ˌrɛs əˈprɒs ɪ ti)

1. a reciprocal state or relation.
2. reciprocation; mutual exchange.
3. the policy in commercial dealings between countries by which corresponding advantages or privileges are granted by each country to the citizens of the other.
[1760–70; < Latin reciproc(us) (see reciprocal) + -ity]




ka me, ka thee Do a good deed for another and the favor will be returned. This expression appeared in print as early as the mid-16th century. The exact origin is unknown and many variants were used interchangeably with ka, such as kaw, kae, k, kay, and kob. Scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours is a current analogous expression which like the proverbial Do unto others as you would have them do unto you implies reciprocity of service, flattery, or favors.

Ka me, ka thee, one good turn asketh another. (John Hey wood, Works, 1562)

logrolling The trading of votes or favors, especially among legislators, for mutual political gain; the policy of “you scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours.” In pioneer days a logrolling was a gathering at which neighbors helped each other roll and pile their logs to a particular spot for burning or other means of disposal. It was similar in nature to barn raisings and husking bees. Literal logrolling also played an important part in lumber camps where members of different camps often joined forces in rolling their logs to the water’s edge to catch the flood downstream. This U.S. term apparently came from the proverbial expression “you roll my log and I’ll roll yours.” Political use of the term dates from the early 19th century.

Territorial supreme courts have long since become known as a kind of log-rolling machine, in which the judges enter in the business of “you tickle me and I will tickle you.” (Weekly New Mexican Review, July, 1885)

one hand washes the other A proverbial expression originally denoting mutual cooperation in its positive sense only, but now carrying the negative connotations of backscratching, cronyism, and logrolling. It appeared as early as the 1500s in the former sense, but within a few centuries began to take on the latter dubious coloration.

Persons in business … who make, as the saying is, “one hand wash the other.” (Diary of Philip Hone, 1836)

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reciprocity - a relation of mutual dependence or action or influence
relation - an abstraction belonging to or characteristic of two entities or parts together
complementarity - the interrelation of reciprocity whereby one thing supplements or depends on the other; "the complementarity of the sexes"
correlation, correlativity - a reciprocal relation between two or more things
interdependence, interdependency, mutuality - a reciprocal relation between interdependent entities (objects or individuals or groups)
mutuality, mutualness - a reciprocality of sentiments; "the mutuality of their affection was obvious"
reciprocal - something (a term or expression or concept) that has a reciprocal relation to something else; "risk is the reciprocal of safety"
2.reciprocity - mutual exchange of commercial or other privileges
interchange, reciprocation, give-and-take - mutual interaction; the activity of reciprocating or exchanging (especially information)


[ˌresɪˈprɒsɪtɪ] Nreciprocidad f


n (of feelings, kindness etc)Gegenseitigkeit f; (of favours)Austausch m; (Pol) → Gegenseitigkeit f, → Reziprozität f (form)


[ˌrɛsɪˈprɒsətɪ] nreciprocità


n. reciprocidad.
References in classic literature ?
In society there were silly conversations lasting half a minute, cool acquaintanceships founded on such half-minutes, general reciprocity of suspicion, overcrowding, insufficient ventilation, bad music badly executed, late hours, unwholesome food, intoxicating liquors, jealous competition in useless expenditure, husband-hunting, flirting, dancing, theatres, and concerts.
As counter-examples, there are numerous schools of Buddhism, some of which DO offer a type of heaven; and the Confucian ideal of reciprocity can easily be, and often has been, misinterpreted in the same way as Semitic religions.
A secret voice seems to whisper to me that there must be something more than chance in this unexpected reciprocity of friendship.
Sometimes, however, reciprocity of correlation does not appear to exist.
I had them in another form, with more of a certain sort of reciprocity, during the hours that I sat in the garden looking up over the top of my book at the closed windows of my hostess.
Guppy, "I have got into that state of mind myself that I wish for a reciprocity of magnanimous behaviour.
Here besides the law of retrospection, which regards all the past as a preparation for events that subsequently occur, the law of reciprocity comes in, confusing the whole matter.
Theodore Roosevelt, President of the United States a few years prior to this time, made the following public declaration: "A more liberal and extensive reciprocity in the purchase and sale of commodities is necessary, so that the overproduction of the United States can be satisfactorily disposed of to foreign countries.
Roker looked, for a reciprocity of feeling, into the countenance of Samuel Weller, who, until now, had observed a dignified silence.
com)-- The Gateway Family YMCA announces the expansion of health and wellness opportunities for members as part of a statewide membership reciprocity program.
Cialdini says this strategy works because people across cultures learn the reciprocity norm from a young age.
Legislation needed to ensure uniformity and reciprocity in licensing of claims professionals to protect consumers