recitation


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rec·i·ta·tion

 (rĕs′ĭ-tā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act of reciting memorized materials in a public performance.
b. The material so presented.
2.
a. Oral delivery of prepared lessons by a pupil.
b. The class period within which this delivery occurs.
3. A regularly scheduled instructional session, often led by a student teacher or teaching assistant, in which a small group of students discuss material taught to a larger group in a lecture.

recitation

(ˌrɛsɪˈteɪʃən)
n
1. the act of reciting from memory, or a formal reading of verse before an audience
2. something recited

rec•i•ta•tion

(ˌrɛs ɪˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
1. an act of reciting.
2. a reciting or repeating of something from memory, esp. formally or publicly.
3. oral response by a pupil or pupils to a teacher on a prepared lesson.
4. a period of classroom instruction.
[1475–85; < Latin recitātiō=recitā(re) to recite + -tiō -tion]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.recitation - written matter that is recited from memory
matter - written works (especially in books or magazines); "he always took some reading matter with him on the plane"
2.recitation - a public instance of reciting or repeating (from memory) something prepared in advance; "the program included songs and recitations of well-loved poems"
oral presentation, public speaking, speechmaking, speaking - delivering an address to a public audience; "people came to see the candidates and hear the speechmaking"
declamation - recitation of a speech from memory with studied gestures and intonation as an exercise in elocution or rhetoric
3.recitation - a regularly scheduled session as part of a course of study
course, course of instruction, course of study, class - education imparted in a series of lessons or meetings; "he took a course in basket weaving"; "flirting is not unknown in college classes"
session - a meeting devoted to a particular activity; "a filming session"; "a gossip session"
4.recitation - systematic training by multiple repetitions; "practice makes perfect"
grooming, training, preparation - activity leading to skilled behavior
fire drill - an exercise intended to train people in duties and escape procedures to be followed in case of fire
manual of arms, manual - (military) a prescribed drill in handling a rifle
military drill - training in marching and the use of weapons
rehearsal - (psychology) a form of practice; repetition of information (silently or aloud) in order to keep it in short-term memory
dry run, rehearsal - a practice session in preparation for a public performance (as of a play or speech or concert); "he missed too many rehearsals"; "a rehearsal will be held the day before the wedding"
brushup, review - practice intended to polish performance or refresh the memory
scrimmage - (American football) practice play between a football team's squads
shadowboxing - sparring with an imaginary opponent (for exercise or training)
target practice - practice in shooting at targets

recitation

noun
1. recital, reading, performance, piece, passage, lecture, rendering, narration, telling The transmission began with a recitation from the Koran.
2. account, story, description, narration, recapitulation The letter was a short recitation of their problem.
3. reading, piece, passage, verse, monologue These recitations form an important part of their religion.
Translations
إلْقاء قَصائِدتِلاوَه، تَسْميع، إلْقاء
přednesrecitování
fremsigelserecitation
szavalat
flutningurtexti fluttur eftir minni
prednesrecitovanie
ezberden okumaezbere okunan parça

recitation

[ˌresɪˈteɪʃən] N [of poetry] → recitación f; [of facts] → relación f

recitation

[ˌrɛsɪˈteɪʃən] n
[poetry, prayer, religious text] → récitation f

recitation

nVortrag m; to give a recitation of somethingetw vortragen

recitation

[ˌrɛsɪˈteɪʃn] nrecitazione f
to give recitations from Shakespeare → recitare brani da Shakespeare

recite

(rəˈsait) verb
to repeat aloud from memory. to recite a poem.
reˈcital noun
1. a public performance (of music or songs) usually by one person or a small number of people. a recital of Schubert's songs.
2. the act of reciting.
ˌreciˈtation (resi-) noun
1. a poem etc which is recited. a recitation from Shakespeare.
2. the act of reciting.
References in classic literature ?
and led her to the recitation platform, and made her stand there half and hour, holding the slate so everyone could see.
Music, dancing, and a recitation or two were the entertainments furnished, or rather, offered.
into a stillness, a pause of all life, that had nothing to do with the more or less noise that at the moment we might be engaged in making and that I could hear through any deepened exhilaration or quickened recitation or louder strum of the piano.
However, they worried through, and each got his reward -- in small blue tickets, each with a passage of Scripture on it; each blue ticket was pay for two verses of the recitation.
He merely accomplishes each lesson as a task to be rid of as quickly as possible and I am sure that no lesson ever again enters his mind until the hours of study and recitation once more arrive.
All three began slowly to circle round, raising and stamping their feet and waving their arms; a kind of tune crept into their rhythmic recitation, and a refrain,--"Aloola," or "Balloola," it sounded like.
Now, in the first place, this censure attaches not to the poetic but to the histrionic art; for gesticulation may be equally overdone in epic recitation, as by Sosi-stratus, or in lyrical competition, as by Mnasitheus the Opuntian.
Let me conclude by -- the recitation of yet another brief poem -- one very different in character from any that I have before quoted.
I thought the limit of ghoulishness already had been reached in the recitation of Issus' menu.
Philip's eyes wandered to her, and Cronshaw, having finished the recitation of his verses, smiled upon him indulgently.
But Aglaya evidently thoroughly enjoyed the affectation and ceremony with which she was introducing her recitation of the poem.
Casaubon had often dwelt on some explanation or questionable detail of which Dorothea did not see the bearing; but such imperfect coherence seemed due to the brokenness of their intercourse, and, supported by her faith in their future, she had listened with fervid patience to a recitation of possible arguments to be brought against Mr.