recluse


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rec·luse

 (rĕk′lo͞os′, rĭ-klo͞os′)
n.
A person who withdraws from the world to live in seclusion and often in solitude.
adj. re·cluse (rĭ-klo͞os′, rĕk′lo͞os′)
Withdrawn from the world; reclusive.

[Middle English, from Old French reclus, from Latin reclūsus, past participle of reclūdere, to shut up : re-, re- + claudere, to close.]

recluse

(rɪˈkluːs)
n
1. a person who lives in seclusion
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a person who lives in solitude to devote himself to prayer and religious meditation; a hermit, anchorite, or anchoress
adj
solitary; retiring
[C13: from Old French reclus, from Late Latin reclūdere to shut away, from Latin re- + claudere to close]
reclusion n
reˈclusive adj

rec•luse

(ˈrɛk lus, rɪˈklus)

n.
1. a person who lives in seclusion or apart from society.
adj. re•cluse
[1175–1225; Middle English < Old French reclus < Late Latin reclūsus, past participle of reclūdere to shut in, lock up]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.recluse - one who lives in solituderecluse - one who lives in solitude    
lone hand, lone wolf, loner - a person who avoids the company or assistance of others
Adj.1.recluse - withdrawn from society; seeking solitude; "lived an unsocial reclusive life"
unsocial - not seeking or given to association; being or living without companions; "the unsocial disposition to neglect one's neighbors"

recluse

noun hermit, solitary, ascetic, anchoress, monk, anchorite, eremite His widow became a virtual recluse for the remainder of her life.

recluse

adjective
Solitary and shut off from society:
Translations
مُنْعَزِل عن النّاس، ناسِك
-kasmolař
eneboer
einsetumaîur
vientuļnieks
samotár

recluse

[rɪˈkluːs] Nsolitario/a m/f

recluse

[rɪˈkluːs] nreclus(e) m/f, ermite m

recluse

nEinsiedler(in) m(f)

recluse

[rɪˈkluːs] nrecluso/a, eremita m

recluse

(rəˈkluːs) noun
a person who lives alone and avoids other people.
References in classic literature ?
Macmillan's collected edition of the poet's works, with the first book of The Recluse, now published for the first time, and of an excellent introductory essay by Mr.
Not only so, but he had withdrawn himself almost altogether from social life and become a recluse.
Father Sergius lived as a recluse for another seven years.
Too readily doth the recluse reach his hand to any one who meeteth him.
It brought some pittance to the miserable penitent from time to time, looked through the hole to see whether he were still living, forgot his name, hardly knew how many years ago he had begun to die, and to the stranger, who questioned them about the living skeleton who was perishing in that cellar, the neighbors replied simply, "It is the recluse.
But a grumpy recluse cannot worry his subordinates: whereas the man in whom the sense of duty is strong (or, perhaps, only the sense of self-importance), and who persists in airing on deck his moroseness all day - and perhaps half the night - becomes a grievous infliction.
Not with such fervor prays the torpid recluse, looking forward to the cold, sunless, stagnant calm of a day that is to be like innumerable yesterdays.
But through the remainder of Hester's life there were indications that the recluse of the scarlet letter was the object of love and interest with some inhabitant of another land.
He went to call indeed; but he was perhaps relieved to be denied admittance; perhaps, in his heart, he preferred to speak with Poole upon the doorstep and surrounded by the air and sounds of the open city, rather than to be admitted into that house of voluntary bondage, and to sit and speak with its inscrutable recluse.
I must not remain forever a recluse, for similar chances have come my way before.
A man may have as much wisdom in the possession of an affluent fortune, as any beggar in the streets; or may enjoy a handsome wife or a hearty friend, and still remain as wise as any sour popish recluse, who buries all his social faculties, and starves his belly while he well lashes his back.
And that was a day of romance; If those robber-barons were somewhat grim and drunken ogres, they had a certain grandeur of the wild beast in them,--they were forest boars with tusks, tearing and rending, not the ordinary domestic grunter; they represented the demon forces forever in collision with beauty, virtue, and the gentle uses of life; they made a fine contrast in the picture with the wandering minstrel, the soft-lipped princess, the pious recluse, and the timid Israelite.