recondite


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rec·on·dite

 (rĕk′ən-dīt′, rĭ-kŏn′dīt′)
adj.
1. Not easily understood; abstruse or obscure: "To gain a reputation for wisdom a man must seem to have a store of recondite knowledge" (Bertrand Russell).
2. Concealed; hidden.

[Latin reconditus, past participle of recondere, to put away : re-, re- + condere, to put together, preserve; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]

rec′on·dite′ly adv.

recondite

(rɪˈkɒndaɪt; ˈrɛkənˌdaɪt)
adj
1. requiring special knowledge to be understood; abstruse
2. dealing with abstruse or profound subjects
[C17: from Latin reconditus hidden away, from re- + condere to conceal]
reˈconditely adv
reˈconditeness n

rec•on•dite

(ˈrɛk ənˌdaɪt, rɪˈkɒn daɪt)

adj.
1. pertaining to or dealing with very profound, difficult, or abstruse subject matter: a recondite treatise.
2. known or understood by relatively few; esoteric; arcane.
3. obscure.
[1640–50; < Latin reconditus recondite, hidden, orig. past participle of recondere to hide =re- re- + condere to bring together (con- con- + -dere to put)]
rec′on•dite`ly, adv.
rec′on•dite`ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.recondite - difficult to penetraterecondite - difficult to penetrate; incomprehensible to one of ordinary understanding or knowledge; "the professor's lectures were so abstruse that students tended to avoid them"; "a deep metaphysical theory"; "some recondite problem in historiography"
esoteric - confined to and understandable by only an enlightened inner circle; "a compilation of esoteric philosophical theories"

recondite

recondite

adjective
Beyond the understanding of an average mind:
Slang: heavy.
Translations

recondite

[rɪˈkɒndaɪt] ADJ (frm) → recóndito

recondite

[ˈrɛkəndaɪt] adjabstrus(e), obscur(e)

recondite

adjabstrus

recondite

[rɪˈkɒndaɪt] adj (frm) → recondito/a
References in classic literature ?
With her near-sightedness, and those tremulous fingers of hers, at once inflexible and delicate, she could not be a seamstress; although her sampler, of fifty years gone by, exhibited some of the most recondite specimens of ornamental needlework.
But to learn all about these recondite matters, your best way is at once to descend into the blubber-room, and have a long talk with its inmates.
I remarked, moreover, with respect to experiments, that they become always more necessary the more one is advanced in knowledge; for, at the commencement, it is better to make use only of what is spontaneously presented to our senses, and of which we cannot remain ignorant, provided we bestow on it any reflection, however slight, than to concern ourselves about more uncommon and recondite phenomena: the reason of which is, that the more uncommon often only mislead us so long as the causes of the more ordinary are still unknown; and the circumstances upon which they depend are almost always so special and minute as to be highly difficult to detect.
The Time Traveller (for so it will be convenient to speak of him) was expounding a recondite matter to us.
Sometimes she might have been seen squatting upon her haunches in front of a huge wooden basin, and kneading poee-poee with terrific vehemence, dashing the stone pestle about as if she would shiver the vessel into fragments; on other occasions, galloping about the valley in search of a particular kind of leaf, used in some of her recondite operations, and returning home, toiling and sweating, with a bundle of it, under which most women would have sunk.
Babcock's birthplace, and, for reasons too recondite to unfold, his visit there always assumed in his mind a jocular cast.
Aylmer had converted those smoky, dingy, sombre rooms, where he had spent his brightest years in recondite pursuits, into a series of beautiful apartments not unfit to be the secluded abode of a lovely woman.
Her vagaries soon ceased to puzzle me: the psychology of Jane Braithwaite was not recondite.
Still further, like a human, he could and did perceive, and such perceptions did flower in his brain as concepts, certainly not so wide and deep and recondite as those of humans, but concepts nevertheless.
We hear from mathematicians that bees have practically solved a recondite problem, and have made their cells of the proper shape to hold the greatest possible amount of honey, with the least possible consumption of precious wax in their construction.
Others of Lyly's affectations are rhetorical questions, hosts of allusions to classical history, and literature, and an unfailing succession of similes from all the recondite knowledge that he can command, especially from the fantastic collection of fables which, coming down through the Middle Ages from the Roman writer Pliny, went at that time by the name of natural history and which we have already encountered in the medieval Bestiaries.
Once I remember "My wife's sailor-brother Captain Anthony" being produced in connection with nothing less recondite than a sunset.