recourse

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Related to recourses: resources

re·course

 (rē′kôrs′, rĭ-kôrs′)
n.
1. The act or an instance of turning to or making use of a person or thing for aid or in an effort to achieve something: have recourse to the courts.
2. One that is turned to or made use of for aid or security: His only recourse was the police.
3. Law The right of a creditor to demand payment from an endorser or guarantor when the primary debtor fails to pay.

[Middle English recours, from Old French, from Latin recursus, a running back, from past participle of recurrere, to run back : re-, re- + currere, to run; see kers- in Indo-European roots.]

recourse

(rɪˈkɔːs)
n
1. the act of resorting to a person, course of action, etc, in difficulty or danger (esp in the phrase have recourse to)
2. a person, organization, or course of action that is turned to for help, protection, etc
3. (Law) the right to demand payment, esp from the drawer or endorser of a bill of exchange or other negotiable instrument when the person accepting it fails to pay
4. (Law) without recourse a qualified endorsement on such a negotiable instrument, by which the endorser protects himself or herself from liability to subsequent holders
[C14: from Old French recours, from Late Latin recursus a running back, from re- + currere to run]

re•course

(ˈri kɔrs, -koʊrs, rɪˈkɔrs, -ˈkoʊrs)

n.
1. access or resort to a person or thing for help or protection.
2. a person or thing resorted to for help or protection.
3. the right to collect from a maker or endorser of a negotiable instrument.
[1350–1400; Middle English recours < Old French < Late Latin recursus, Latin: return, withdrawal, derivative of recurrere to run back]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.recourse - act of turning to for assistance; "have recourse to the courts"; "an appeal to his uncle was his last resort"
assist, assistance, help, aid - the activity of contributing to the fulfillment of a need or furtherance of an effort or purpose; "he gave me an assist with the housework"; "could not walk without assistance"; "rescue party went to their aid"; "offered his help in unloading"
2.recourse - something or someone turned to for assistance or security; "his only recourse was the police"; "took refuge in lying"
resource - a source of aid or support that may be drawn upon when needed; "the local library is a valuable resource"
shadow - refuge from danger or observation; "he felt secure in his father's shadow"

recourse

noun option, choice, alternative, resort, appeal, resource, remedy, way out, refuge, expedient The public believes its only recourse is to take to the streets.

recourse

noun
That to which one turns for help when in desperation:
Translations

recourse

[rɪˈkɔːs] N to have recourse torecurrir a

recourse

[rɪˈkɔːrs] nrecours m
to have recourse to → recourir à, avoir recours à

recourse

nZuflucht f; to have recourse to somebodysich an jdn wenden; to have recourse to somethingZuflucht zu etw nehmen; without recourse to his booksohne seine Bücher zu konsultieren; without recourse (Fin) → ohne Regress

recourse

[rɪˈkɔːs] n (frm) to have recourse toricorrere a, far ricorso a

recourse

n. recurso, auxilio.

recourse

n recurso
References in classic literature ?
Several times did I have recourse to this desperate expedient, and I know not how long I had been a prisoner when one day I fancied that I heard something near me, which breathed loudly.
She then had recourse to the golden pomegranate, and on opening it found that all the seeds were as many little violins which flew up in the vaulted roof and at once began playing melodiously.
In his account of the mission, where his veracity is most to be suspected, he neither exaggerates overmuch the merits of the Jesuits, if we consider the partial regard paid by the Portuguese to their countrymen, by the Jesuits to their society, and by the Papists to their church, nor aggravates the vices of the Abyssins; but if the reader will not be satisfied with a Popish account of a Popish mission, he may have recourse to the history of the church of Abyssinia, written by Dr.
Finding, then, that, in fact he could not move, he thought himself of having recourse to his usual remedy, which was to think of some passage in his books, and his craze brought to his mind that about Baldwin and the Marquis of Mantua, when Carloto left him wounded on the mountain side, a story known by heart by the children, not forgotten by the young men, and lauded and even believed by the old folk; and for all that not a whit truer than the miracles of Mahomet.