recoverable


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re·cov·er

 (rĭ-kŭv′ər)
v. re·cov·ered, re·cov·er·ing, re·cov·ers
v.tr.
1.
a. To get back (something lost or taken away), especially by making an effort: recovered his keys near the water cooler; recovered the ball in the end zone.
b. To search for, find, and bring back: divers recovered the body; researchers recovering fossils.
c. To get back control or possession of (land) by military conquest or legal action.
2.
a. To have (the use, possession, or control of something) restored: recovered the use of his fingers.
b. To regain the use of (a faculty) or be restored to (a normal or usual condition): recovered his wits after hearing the news; recovered his health after treatment.
c. To cause to be restored to a normal or usual condition: After two weeks on the medicine, he was fully recovered.
3. To discover or be able to follow (a trail or scent) after losing it.
4.
a. To procure (usable substances, such as metal) from unusable substances, such as ore or waste.
b. To bring (land) into or return to a suitable condition for use; reclaim.
5. To bring under observation again: "watching the comet since it was first recovered—first spotted since its 1910 visit" (Christian Science Monitor).
v.intr.
1. To regain a normal or usual condition, as of health: a patient who recovered from the flu; businesses that recovered quickly from the recession.
2. To receive a favorable judgment in a lawsuit.

[Middle English recoveren, from Old French recoverer, from Latin recuperāre; see recuperate.]

re·cov′er·a·ble adj.
re·cov′er·er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.recoverable - capable of being recovered or regained; "recoverable truth of a past event"
irrecoverable, unrecoverable - incapable of being recovered or regained
Translations

recoverable

[rɪˈkʌvərəbl] ADJrecuperable; (at law) → reivindicable

recoverable

[rɪˈkʌvərəbəl] adj [costs] → recouvrable

recoverable

adj (Fin) debteintreibbar; losses, damagesersetzbar; depositzurückzahlbar; goodsrückgewinnbar, eintreibbar, wiedererlangbar

recoverable

[riˈkʌvərəbl] adj (debt, loss) → ricuperabile
References in classic literature ?
She had good reason to believe that some property of her husband in the West Indies, which had been for many years under a sort of sequestration for the payment of its own incumbrances, might be recoverable by proper measures; and this property, though not large, would be enough to make her comparatively rich.
On April 15, 2010, the MoO had sent to the central cabinet a proposal worked out by Ameedi's directorate to convert recoverable five-year soft loans from IOCs developing two of the country's giant oilfields into un-recoverable signature bonuses.
According to an official document the country had exhausted more than half of the original domestic recoverable oil reserves, necessitating solid measures for exploring more oil and gas reserves to meet the growing energy needs.
The document said the country had exhausted more than half of the original domestic recoverable oil reserves, necessitating solid measures for exploring more oil and gas reserves to meet the growing energy needs.
section] 1920 states that among the recoverable expenses are "the costs of making copies of any materials where the copies are necessarily obtained for use in the case," according to Shane Olafson, a partner at Lewis Roca Rothberger LLP, in a recent The National Law Review article.
Recoverable oil reserves in Qatar have been the subject of varied speculations.
08 trillion cubic metres (tcm) of potentially recoverable shale gas resources, the Ministry of Land and Resources said, in the first official appraisal of the unconventional fuel that was based on some empirical surveys.
The Marcellus Shale contains about 84 Tcf of undiscovered, technically recoverable natural gas and 3.
He would not say whether the estimate was recoverable or in-place.
Hubbert argued that oil production grows until half the recoverable resources in a field have been extracted, after which production falls off at the same rate at which it expanded.
For assets other than goodwill or indefinite-lived intangibles, an impairment charge is recognized whenever an asset's recoverable amount (the higher of its fair value less costs to sell, and its value in use) exceeds its carrying amount.
The annual statement will not include a separate line item for deferred taxes; rather, the annual statement balance sheet will show a current tax recoverable or current tax liability net of deferred taxes.