rector


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rec·tor

 (rĕk′tər)
n. Abbr. R.
1. A cleric in charge of a parish in the Episcopal Church.
2. An Anglican parish priest in a parish where historically the priest was entitled to the tithes.
3. A Roman Catholic priest appointed to be managerial as well as spiritual head of a church or other institution, such as a seminary or university.
4. The principal of certain schools, colleges, and universities.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin rēctor, director, from rēctus past participle of regere, to rule; see reg- in Indo-European roots.]

rec′tor·ate (-ĭt) n.
rec·to′ri·al (rĕk-tôr′ē-əl) adj.

rector

(ˈrɛktə)
n
1. (Anglicanism) Church of England a clergyman in charge of a parish in which, as its incumbent, he would formerly have been entitled to the whole of the tithes. Compare vicar
2. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church a cleric in charge of a college, religious house, or congregation
3. (Protestantism) Episcopal Church Scottish Episcopal Church a clergyman in charge of a parish
4. (Education) chiefly Brit the head of certain schools or colleges
5. (in Scotland) a high-ranking official in a university: now a public figure elected for three years by the students
[C14: from Latin: director, ruler, from regere to rule]
ˈrectorate n
rectorial adj
ˈrectorship n

rec•tor

(ˈrɛk tər)

n.
1. a member of the clergy in charge of a parish in the Episcopal Church.
2. a Roman Catholic ecclesiastic in charge of a college, religious house, or congregation.
3. a member of the Anglican clergy who has the charge of a parish with full possession of all its rights, tithes, etc.
4. the head of certain universities, colleges, or schools.
[1350–1400; Middle English rectour < Latin rēctor helmsman, leader =reg(ere) to rule + -tor -tor]
rec′tor•ate, rec′tor•ship`, n.
rec•to•ri•al (rɛkˈtɔr i əl, -ˈtoʊr-) adj.

rector

- First was a ruler or governor, now it is generally a person conducting a religious service.
See also related terms for ruler.

rector

A title for the head of some schools, colleges, or universities.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rector - a person authorized to conduct religious worshiprector - a person authorized to conduct religious worship; "clergymen are usually called ministers in Protestant churches"
clergyman, man of the cloth, reverend - a member of the clergy and a spiritual leader of the Christian Church
ministrant - someone who serves as a minister

rector

noun priest, minister, vicar, preacher, pastor, chaplain, curate He was the rector of the church.
Translations
رَئيس الجامِعَه او الكُليَّهقَسّقِسّيس بالكَنيسَة الإنْجليزيَّه
farářpastorředitelrektor
præstrektorsognepræst
pastori
vikar
rektor, skólastjórisóknarprestur
教区牧師
교구 목사
draudzes mācītājs
kyrkoherde
พระในคริสต์ศาสนา
cha sứ

rector

[ˈrektəʳ] N (Rel) → párroco m (Univ etc) → rector(a) m/f

rector

[ˈrɛktər] n
(RELIGION)pasteur m
(in Scottish universities) personnalité élue par les étudiants pour les représenter

rector

n
(Rel) → Pfarrer m (der Anglikanischen Kirche)
(Scot) (Sch) → Direktor(in) m(f); (Univ) → Rektor(in) m(f)

rector

[ˈrɛktəʳ] n (Rel) → parroco (anglicano) (Univ) → rettore m; (in Scottish universities) personalità eletta dagli studenti per rappresentarli; (of school) → preside m/f

rector

(ˈrektə) noun
1. in certain churches, a clergyman or priest in charge of a parish etc.
2. the head of a university, school or college.

rector

قَسّ farář præst Pfarrer εφημέριος cura párroco pastori vicaire vikar vicario 教区牧師 교구 목사 predikant sogneprest pastor vigário викарий kyrkoherde พระในคริสต์ศาสนา papaz yardımcısı cha sứ 教区牧师
References in classic literature ?
The clergyman was well known as the rector of a place situated some few miles inland.
But I alluded to my native rector--meaning the rector of my native village, Auburn.
We continued our voyage, and almost without stopping sailed by Surate and Damam, where the rector of the college came to see us, but so sea-sick that the interview was without any satisfaction on either side.
He also added that I should go and be the rector of this college.
One concerns the rector of Alencon, who had formerly taken the constitutional oath, and who was now conquering the repugnance of the Catholics by a display of the highest virtues.
A fortunate chance had recommended him to Lady Catherine de Bourgh when the living of Hunsford was vacant; and the respect which he felt for her high rank, and his veneration for her as his patroness, mingling with a very good opinion of himself, of his authority as a clergyman, and his right as a rector, made him altogether a mixture of pride and obsequiousness, self-importance and humility.
Madam," answered the rector, in great perplexity, "this strange occurrence brings to my mind a marriage sermon of the famous Bishop Taylor, wherein he mingles so many thoughts of mortality and future woe, that, to speak somewhat after his own rich style, he seems to hang the bridal chamber in black, and cut the wedding garment out of a coffin pall.
Daubeny, our rector here, provides, with the assistance of his curates, really admirable recreations for the poor during the winter.
Adolphus Irwine, Rector of Broxton, Vicar of Hayslope, and Vicar of Blythe, a pluralist at whom the severest Church reformer would have found it difficult to look sour.
to be crude and cold: to me, coming fresh from the ever-advancing developments of a London church under a soi-disant 'Catholic' Rector, it was unspeakably refreshing.
It had then seemed the object nearest her heart, that Dr Shirley, the rector, who for more than forty years had been zealously discharging all the duties of his office, but was now growing too infirm for many of them, should be quite fixed on engaging a curate; should make his curacy quite as good as he could afford, and should give Charles Hayter the promise of it.
said the maid, and the new rector of Summer Street was shown in; he had at once started on friendly relations, owing to Lucy's praise of him in her letters from Florence.