rectory


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rec·to·ry

 (rĕk′tə-rē)
n. pl. rec·to·ries
1. The house in which a parish priest or minister lives.
2.
a. An Anglican rector's dwelling.
b. An Anglican rector's office and benefice.

rectory

(ˈrɛktərɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the official house of a rector
2. (Anglicanism) Church of England the office and benefice of a rector

rec•to•ry

(ˈrɛk tə ri)

n., pl. -ries.
1. a rector's house; parsonage.
2. a benefice held by an Anglican rector.
[1530–40; < Medieval Latin rēctōria= Latin rēctōr- (s. of rēctor) rector + -ia -y3]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rectory - an official residence provided by a church for its parson or vicar or rectorrectory - an official residence provided by a church for its parson or vicar or rector
glebe house - a parsonage (especially one provided for the holder of a benefice)
residence - the official house or establishment of an important person (as a sovereign or president); "he refused to live in the governor's residence"
Translations

rectory

[ˈrektərɪ] Ncasa f del párroco

rectory

[ˈrɛktəri] npresbytère m

rectory

n (= house)Pfarrhaus nt

rectory

[ˈrɛktrɪ] ncasa parrocchiale (anglicana)
References in classic literature ?
It is a rectory, but a small one; the late incumbent, I believe, did not make more than 200 L per annum, and though it is certainly capable of improvement, I fear, not to such an amount as to afford him a very comfortable income.
Besides living thus for his people Herbert almost rebuilt the church and rectory both of which he found very ruined.
Remarkable Pettibone, who had forgotten the wound received by her pride, in contemplation of the ease and comforts of her situation, and who still retained her station in the family of judge Temple, was dispatched to the humble dwelling which Richard already styled “The Rectory,” in attendance on Louisa, who was soon consigned to the arms of her father.
But come, let us hasten to Bess, for Louisa has already gone to the rectory.
At length, Edwards, after repeating his intention to do so for the third time, left the mansion-house to go to the rectory on a similar errand of friendship.
She had resolved on walking to the Rectory and asking to see Dr.
But she was at the Rectory now; there, perhaps, she would find something else than retribution.
My mind, however, is now made up on the subject, for having received ordination at Easter, I have been so fortunate as to be distinguished by the patronage of the Right Honourable Lady Catherine de Bourgh, widow of Sir Lewis de Bourgh, whose bounty and beneficence has preferred me to the valuable rectory of this parish, where it shall be my earnest endeavour to demean myself with grateful respect towards her Ladyship, and be ever ready to perform those rites and ceremonies which are instituted by the Church of England.
He would ride to Broxton Rectory the first thing after breakfast to-morrow.
On his way home he turned into the Rectory and asked for Mr.
She had signified, however, her intention of leaving her inheritance between Sir Pitt's second son and the family at the Rectory, and had once or twice paid the debts of Rawdon Crawley in his career at college and in the army.
Barnes worked for the Church of England and lived in a large rectory where a litany of famous names passed through, including poets who were drawn to his eccentric personality and creative gifts.