redemptioner


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re·demp·tion·er

 (rĭ-dĕmp′shə-nər)
n.
A colonial emigrant from Europe to America who paid for the voyage by serving for a specified period as a bondservant.

redemptioner

(rɪˈdɛmpʃənə)
n
(Historical Terms) history an emigrant to Colonial America who paid for his or her passage by becoming an indentured servant

re•demp•tion•er

(rɪˈdɛmp ʃə nər)

n.
an emigrant from Europe who obtained passage to America by becoming an indentured servant.
[1765–75]
References in periodicals archive ?
Written notice is indispensable and mandatory, actual knowledge of the sale acquired in some other manner by the redemptioner notwithstanding.
A redemptioner was not required to pass through any apprenticeship, nor was he required to have a parent who was a member of the guild.
See Grubb (1990) for a discussion of the German redemptioner system.
A: Pursuant to Section 33, Rule 39 of the 1997 Rules of Court, Isko should have redeemed his property from the last redemptioner, his wife.
Convicts, indentured servants, and redemptioners were far more likely to feel the heavy hand of justice; simply being intoxicated in the presence of a magistrate or minister could result in confinement in the stocks or up to 39 lashes.
231, 337 (1901) (reviewing KARL FREDERICK GEISER, REDEMPTIONERS AND SERVANTS IN THE COLONY AND COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA (1901)).
European bound labour (indentured servants, redemptioners, and convict bondservants) continued to arrive until the late eighteenth century, but in numbers far less than that of enslaved Africans.
Some ship captains banned servants and redemptioners altogether and the convict trade between Ireland and America ended.
These early White laborers can be divided into three categories: indentured servants (who were bound by indentures for a specific length of time in exchange for transport from Europe), redemptioners (those who migrated without paying some or all of their passage and who were given time after their arrival to pay the fare before being subject to an indenture), and transported convicts (whom the British government paid to have transported to the colonies).
Souls for Sale: Two German Redemptioners Come to Revolutionary America: The Life Stories of John Frederick Whitehead and Johann Carl Buttner, Max Kade German-American Research Institute Series.
Reports of terrible disease in the destination, especially yellow fever which devastated Philadelphia some years, most significantly in 1793 (BNL 5 November 1793; 8 November 1793), nor warnings of the bad treatment of redemptioners (indentured servants) (BNL 2 February 1790) seemed to dissuade them.
John and Robert Ogle suggested to their Philadelphia correspondent in 1774 that servants and redemptioners "make an advantageous returning freight to vessels loaded from you to us, & is all paid down at Shipping.