redness


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red

 (rĕd)
n.
1.
a. The hue of the long-wave end of the visible spectrum, evoked in the human observer by radiant energy with wavelengths of approximately 630 to 750 nanometers; any of a group of colors that may vary in lightness and saturation and whose hue resembles that of blood; one of the additive or light primaries; one of the psychological primary hues.
b. A pigment or dye having a red hue.
c. Something that has a red hue.
2.
a. often Red A Communist.
b. A revolutionary activist.
3. The condition of being in debt or operating at a loss: The firm has been in the red all year.
adj. red·der, red·dest
1. Having a color resembling that of blood.
2. Reddish in color or having parts that are reddish in color: a red dog; a red oak.
3.
a. Having a reddish or coppery skin color.
b. often Red Often Offensive Of or being a Native American.
4. Having a ruddy or flushed complexion: red with embarrassment.
5. Relating to or being a red state.
6. often Red Communist.

[Middle English, from Old English rēad; see reudh- in Indo-European roots.]

red′ly adv.
red′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.redness - a response of body tissues to injury or irritationredness - a response of body tissues to injury or irritation; characterized by pain and swelling and redness and heat
inflammatory disease - a disease characterized by inflammation
adenitis - inflammation of a gland or lymph node
alveolitis - inflammation of the alveoli in the lungs caused by inhaling dust; with repeated exposure the condition may become chronic
alveolitis, dry socket - inflammation in the socket of a tooth; sometimes occurs after a tooth is extracted and a blood clot fails to form
angiitis - inflammation of a blood vessel or lymph duct
aortitis - inflammation of the aorta
appendicitis - inflammation of the vermiform appendix
arteritis - inflammation of an artery
balanitis - inflammation of the head of the penis
balanoposthitis - inflammation of both the head of the penis and the foreskin
blepharitis - inflammation of the eyelids characterized by redness and swelling and dried crusts
bursitis - inflammation of a bursa; frequently in the shoulder
symptom - (medicine) any sensation or change in bodily function that is experienced by a patient and is associated with a particular disease
carditis - inflammation of the heart
catarrh - inflammation of the nose and throat with increased production of mucus
cellulitis - an inflammation of body tissue (especially that below the skin) characterized by fever and swelling and redness and pain
cervicitis - inflammation of the uterine cervix
cheilitis - inflammation and cracking of the skin of the lips
cholangitis - inflammation of the bile ducts
cholecystitis - inflammation of the gall bladder
chorditis - inflammation of the vocal cords
chorditis - inflammation of the spermatic cord
colitis, inflammatory bowel disease - inflammation of the colon
colpitis - inflammation of the vagina
colpocystitis - inflammation of the vagina and bladder
conjunctivitis, pinkeye - inflammation of the conjunctiva of the eye
corditis - inflammation of the spermatic cord
costochondritis - inflammation at the junction of a rib and its cartilage
dacryocystitis - inflammation of the lacrimal sac causing obstruction of the tube draining tears into the nose
diverticulitis - inflammation of a diverticulum in the digestive tract (especially the colon); characterized by painful abdominal cramping and fever and constipation
cephalitis, encephalitis, phrenitis - inflammation of the brain usually caused by a virus; symptoms include headache and neck pain and drowsiness and nausea and fever (`phrenitis' is no longer in scientific use)
encephalomyelitis - inflammation of the brain and spinal cord
endarteritis - inflammation of the inner lining of an artery
endocervicitis - inflammation of the mucous lining of the uterine cervix
enteritis - inflammation of the intestine (especially the small intestine); usually characterized by diarrhea
epicondylitis - painful inflammation of the muscles and soft tissues around an epicondyle
epididymitis - painful inflammation of the epididymis
epiglottitis - inflammation of the epiglottis; characterized by fever and a severe sore throat and difficulty in swallowing
episcleritis - inflammation of the sclera of the eye
esophagitis, oesophagitis - inflammation of the esophagus; often caused by gastroesophageal reflux
fibrositis - inflammation of white fibrous tissues (especially muscle sheaths)
fibromyositis - local inflammation of muscle and connective tissue
folliculitis - inflammation of a hair follicle
funiculitis - inflammation of a funiculus (especially an inflammation of the spermatic cord)
gastritis - inflammation of the lining of the stomach; nausea and loss of appetite and discomfort after eating
glossitis - inflammation of the tongue
hydrarthrosis - inflammation and swelling of a movable joint because of excess synovial fluid
ileitis - inflammation of the ileum
iridocyclitis - inflammation of the iris and ciliary body of the eye
iridokeratitis - inflammation of the iris and cornea of the eye
iritis - inflammation of the iris
jejunitis - inflammation of the jejunum of the small intestine
jejunoileitis - inflammation of the jejunum and the ileum of the small intestine
keratitis - inflammation of the cornea causing watery painful eyes and blurred vision
keratoconjunctivitis - inflammation of the cornea and conjunctiva
keratoiritis - inflammation of the cornea and the iris of the eye
keratoscleritis - inflammation of the cornea and sclera of the eye
2.redness - red color or pigmentredness - red color or pigment; the chromatic color resembling the hue of blood
sanguine - a blood-red color
chrome red - a red pigment used in paints; basic lead chromate
alizarine red, Turkey red - a bright orange-red color produced in cotton cloth with alizarine dye
carmine, cardinal - a variable color averaging a vivid red
crimson, deep red, ruby - a deep and vivid red color
dark red - a red color that reflects little light
purplish red, purplish-red - a red with a tinge of purple
cerise, cherry red, cherry - a red the color of ripe cherries
orange red, scarlet, vermilion - a variable color that is vivid red but sometimes with an orange tinge
Translations
حُمْرَه
červeňrusost
rødhed
vörösség
roîi
červenosťryšavosť
kırmızılık

redness

[ˈrednɪs] N [of skin, hair] → rojez f

redness

[ˈrɛdnɪs] n
(gen)rougeur f
[hair] → rousseur f

redness

nRöte f

redness

[ˈrɛdnɪs] n (of skin) → rossore m; (of hair, colour) → rosso

red

(red) noun, adjective
1. (of) the colour of blood. a red car/dress / cheeks; red cheeks; a red car/dress / cheeks; Her eyes were red with crying.
2. (of hair or fur) (of) a colour which varies between a golden brown and a deep reddish-brown.
3. (a) communist. Red China; A lot of his university friends are Reds.
the Red Army
the army of the former USSR.
ˈredden verb
1. to make or become red or redder. to redden the lips with lipstick.
2. to blush. She reddened as she realized her mistake.
ˈreddish adjective
slightly red. reddish hair.
ˈredness noun
ˈredcurrant noun
a type of garden bush grown for its small red fruit.
ˈredhead noun
a person with red hair.
red herring
1. something that leads people away from the main point in a discussion.
2. a false clue or line of enquiry.
ˌred-ˈhot adjective
(of metal etc) so hot that it is glowing red. red-hot steel; This iron is red-hot.
Red Indian
a North American Indian.
red-letter day
a day which will always be remembered because of something especially good that happened on it.
red tape
annoying and unnecessary rules and regulations.
be in the red
to be in debt.
catch red-handed
to find (a person) in the act of doing wrong. The police caught the thief red-handed.
see red
to become angry. When he started criticizing my work, I really saw red.

redness

n. enrojecimiento.

redness

n rubor m (form), rojez f
References in classic literature ?
John, white robes are given to the redeemed, and the four-and-twenty elders stand clothed in white before the great white throne, and the Holy One that sitteth there white like wool; yet for all these accumulated associations, with whatever is sweet, and honorable, and sublime, there yet lurks an elusive something in the innermost idea of this hue, which strikes more of panic to the soul than that redness which affrights in blood.
Turn not thy back to the compass; accept the first hint of the hitching tiller; believe not the artificial fire, when its redness makes all things look ghastly.
The west, too, was warm: no watery gleam chilled it--it seemed as if there was a fire lit, an altar burning behind its screen of marbled vapour, and out of apertures shone a golden redness.
But the principle always failed us by some curious fatality, and we never could hit any medium between redness and cinders.
Joe, with black hair and eyes, had such a prevailing redness of skin that I sometimes used to wonder whether it was possible she washed herself with a nutmeg-grater instead of soap.
The patriarch and I have frequently amused ourselves with making observations, and could never discover any redness, but in the shallows, where a kind of weed grew which they call gouesmon, which redness disappeared as soon as we plucked up the plant.
Looking towards the river, we were astonished to see an unaccountable redness mingling with the black of the scorched meadows.
de Treville knew nothing, except that the last time he had seen the cardinal, the king, and the queen, the cardinal looked very thoughtful, the king uneasy, and the redness of the queen's eyes donated that she had been sleepless or tearful.
The Englishman turned down his shirt-collar, and showed a scar, whose redness proved it to be a recent one.
The virulent redness of his shock head and beard was most startling, and in the thicket of hair twinkled above high cheek-bones two very merry blue eyes.
The inhabitants of the cavern, moreover, were unlovely personages, dark, smoke-begrimed, generally deformed, with misshapen feet, and a glow of dusky redness in their eyes as if their hearts had caught fire and were blazing out of the upper windows.
Gliddon was of opinion, from the redness of the epidermis, that the embalmment had been effected altogether by asphaltum; but, on scraping the surface with a steel instrument, and throwing into the fire some of the powder thus obtained, the flavor of camphor and other sweet-scented gums became apparent.