redressive

redressive

(rɪˈdrɛsɪv)
adj
having a tendency to redress
References in periodicals archive ?
In attempting to realize their murderous intentions or to resolve their problems through specialists in killing and/or healing, the clients in our sample act according to rational criteria of efficiency in relation to other redressive mechanisms available: that is, they plan their moves and search for a proficient practitioner, once they are convinced that the desirable outcome is unrealizable by normative and pragmatic means.
94) Possibly, there was never an opportunity for redressive justice to properly be brought about in the Watch example because redressive justice can only be legitimate when it meets the terms of procedural justice.
In their model (Brown and Levinson, 1978), politeness is defined as redressive action taken to counter-balance the disruptive effect of FTAs.
50) One could place Cicero's tactic in this case under the rubric of what Hall terms redressive politeness: "Linguistic strategies that attempt to compensate for the threat to face involved in certain types of social interactions" (cf.
Consequently, according to Brown and Levinson's (1987) Politeness Theory, rational agents either avoid these face-threatening acts or seek to minimize their threat using certain strategies, one of which is redressive action that recognizes and addresses the hearer's wants.
See John CP Goldberg & Benjamin C Zipursky, "Torts as Wrongs" (2010) 88:5 Tex L Rev 917; Jason M Solomon, "Equal Accountability Through Tort Law" (2009) 103:4 Nw UL Rev 1765; Andrew S Gold, "A Theory of Redressive Justice" (2014) 64:2 UTLJ 159.
The arguments they advanced gave theoretical force to such concepts as, to mention a few among the many, the social field, situational analysis, perpetual succession, cross-cutting ties, the dominant cleavage, redressive ritual, repetitive and changing social systems, and processual change (Werbner 1984: 157).
the optionality scale and the indirectness scale) are respectively related to one of the redressive substrategies (give hearer an out) and the off-record strategies, which are part of the set of negative politeness strategies proposed by Brown and Levinson (1987, pp.
Second (and relatedly), whether we take a monadic or bipolar view of some type of wrongdoing will affect our redressive scheme because the distinction bears on whether the claim for redress belongs to the community or to the victim.
Despite the constraints of social norms, the Chinese student still delivered his/her message in a most direct way without any redressive action.
Turner calls the drama of human congregation and segregation "social drama," which goes through recognizable phases: breach, crisis, redressive action, reintegration, or schism.
Redressive action, the third phase, alternates between "the rational idiom of the judicial process", and the "metaphorical and symbolic idiom of a ritual process".