redundancy


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Related to redundancy: Redundancy pay

re·dun·dan·cy

 (rĭ-dŭn′dən-sē)
n. pl. re·dun·dan·cies
1. The state of being redundant.
2. Something redundant or excessive; a superfluity.
3. Repetition of linguistic information inherent in the structure of a language, as singularity in the sentence It works.
4. Excessive wordiness or repetition in expression.
5. Chiefly British
a. The state or fact of being unemployed because work is no longer offered or considered necessary.
b. A dismissal of an employee from work for being no longer necessary; a layoff.
6. Electronics Duplication or repetition of elements in electronic equipment to provide alternative functional channels in case of failure.
7. Repetition of parts or all of a message to circumvent transmission errors.
8. Genetics See degeneracy.
Usage Note: The usages that critics have condemned as redundancies fall into several classes. Some expressions, such as old adage, mental telepathy, and VAT tax have become fixed expressions and seem harmless enough. In some cases, such as consensus of opinion and hollow tube, the use of what is regarded as an unnecessary modifier or qualifier can sometimes be justified on the grounds that it in fact makes a semantic contribution. Thus a hollow tube can be distinguished from one that has been blocked up with deposits, and a consensus of opinion can be distinguished from a consensus of judgments or practices. Some locutions, such as close proximity, have been so well established that criticizing them may seem petty.

redundancy

(rɪˈdʌndənsɪ)
n, pl -cies
1. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms)
a. the state or condition of being redundant or superfluous, esp superfluous in one's job
b. (as modifier): a redundancy payment.
2. Also (less commonly): redundance excessive proliferation or profusion, esp of superfluity
3. (Electronics) duplication of components in electronic or mechanical equipment so that operations can continue following failure of a part
4. (General Engineering) duplication of components in electronic or mechanical equipment so that operations can continue following failure of a part
5. (Telecommunications) repetition of information or inclusion of additional information to reduce errors in telecommunication transmissions and computer processing
6. (Computer Science) repetition of information or inclusion of additional information to reduce errors in telecommunication transmissions and computer processing

re•dun•dan•cy

(rɪˈdʌn dən si)

also re•dun′dance,



n., pl. -dan•cies also -danc•es.
1. the state of being redundant.
2. a redundant thing; superfluity.
3. the provision of a duplicate system or equipment as a backup.
4. Ling.
a. the inclusion of more information than is necessary for communication.
b. the additional, predictable information so included.
c. the degree of predictability thereby created.
5. Chiefly Brit. layoff from a job; unemployment.
[1595–1605; < Latin redundantia an overflowing, excess, derivative of redundāns redundant; see -ancy]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.redundancy - repetition of messages to reduce the probability of errors in transmission
repetitiousness, repetitiveness - verboseness resulting from excessive repetitions
2.redundancy - the attribute of being superfluous and unneeded; "the use of industrial robots created redundancy among workers"
overplus, plethora, superfluity, embarrassment - extreme excess; "an embarrassment of riches"
fifth wheel, deadwood - someone or something that is unwanted and unneeded
3.redundancy - (electronics) a system design that duplicates components to provide alternatives in case one component fails
configuration, constellation - an arrangement of parts or elements; "the outcome depends on the configuration of influences at the time"
electronics - the branch of physics that deals with the emission and effects of electrons and with the use of electronic devices
4.redundancy - repetition of an act needlessly
repeating, repetition - the act of doing or performing again

redundancy

noun
1. layoff, sacking, dismissal They hope to avoid future redundancies.
2. unemployment, the sack (informal), the axe (informal), joblessness Thousands of employees are facing redundancy.
3. superfluity, excess, surplus, surfeit, uselessness, superabundance, expendability the redundancy of its two main exhibits

redundancy

noun
Words or the use of words in excess of those needed for clarity or precision:
Translations
زيادَه عن الحاجَهطَرْد
nadstavpropouštění
afskedigelse
irtisanominenredundanssi
višak
létszámfelesleg
atvinnuleysi
余剰人員の解雇
실업용장잉여중복중복성
friställning
การให้ออกจากงาน
tình trạng dư thừa

redundancy

[rɪˈdʌndənsɪ] (Brit)
A. N
1. (= state of being superfluous) → exceso m, superfluidad f
2. (Brit) [of worker] → despido m; (among workers) → desempleo m
see also compulsory, voluntary
B. CPD redundancy compensation, redundancy payment Nindemnización f por desempleo

redundancy

[rɪˈdʌndənsi]
n
(British) (= job loss) → licenciement m (économique)
There were fifty redundancies → Il y a eu cinquante licenciements.
compulsory redundancy → licenciement m (économique) (par opposition à "voluntary redundancy" (départ volontaire))
voluntary redundancy → départ m volontaire
modif (British) [notice, package, terms] → de licenciement redundancy paymentredundancy payment n (British)indemnité f de licenciement

redundancy

n
Überflüssigkeit f; (of style)Weitschweifigkeit f, → Redundanz f (geh)
(Brit Ind) → Arbeitslosigkeit f; redundanciesEntlassungen pl; the recession caused a lot of redundancy or many redundanciesder Konjunkturrückgang brachte viel Arbeitslosigkeit mit sich; he feared redundancyer hatte Angst, seinen Arbeitsplatz zu verlieren

redundancy

[rɪˈdʌndənsɪ] n (Industry) → licenziamento (per esubero di personale) (frm) (profusion) → superfluità (Literature) → ridondanza
compulsory redundancy → licenziamento (per esubero)
voluntary redundancy forma di cassa integrazione volontaria

redundant

(rəˈdandənt) adjective
(of workers) no longer employed because there is no longer any job for them where they used to work. Fifty men have just been made redundant at the local factory.
reˈdundancyplural reˈdundancies noun
There have been a lot of redundancies at the local factory recently; the problem of redundancy.

redundancy

طَرْد propouštění afskedigelse Entlassung πλεονασμός despido irtisanominen licenciement višak esubero 余剰人員の解雇 해고 overtolligheid arbeidsledighet redukcja etatu despedimento, redundância избыточность friställning การให้ออกจากงาน işten çıkarma tình trạng dư thừa 冗余
References in classic literature ?
Divers negroes, in very free-and-easy pantaloons, and with no redundancy in the shirt line, were scuttling about, hither and thither, without bringing to pass any very particular results, except expressing a generic willingness to turn over everything in creation generally for the benefit of Mas'r and his guests.
I looked at my pupil, who did not at first appear to notice me: she was quite a child, perhaps seven or eight years old, slightly built, with a pale, small-featured face, and a redundancy of hair falling in curls to her waist.
The wood-sawyer, who was a little man with a redundancy of gesture(he had once been a mender of roads), cast a glance at the prison, pointed at the prison, and putting his ten fingers before his face to represent bars, peeped through them jocosely.
The declaration itself, though it may be chargeable with tautology or redundancy, is at least perfectly harmless.
On the other hand, had he found Annie what he fancied, his lot would have been so rich in beauty that out of its mere redundancy he might have wrought the beautiful into many a worthier type than he had toiled for; but the guise in which his sorrow came to him, the sense that the angel of his life had been snatched away and given to a rude man of earth and iron, who could neither need nor appreciate her ministrations,--this was the very perversity of fate that makes human existence appear too absurd and contradictory to be the scene of one other hope or one other fear.
Cavalletto dropped on one knee, and implored him, with a redundancy of gesticulation, to hear what had brought himself into such foul company.
THE first redundancy payments for former SSI workers will be paid into bank accounts today.
The Mail revealed last week more than 100 University of Birmingham academics and support staff had been placed at risk of redundancy - including scientists who had brought in more than PS8 million of grant money over the last five years.
The Post revealed last week more than 100 University of Birmingham academics and support staff had been placed at risk of redundancy - including high-calibre scientists.
NEARLY PS2m has been spent by the NHS in Wales on redundancy pay for just a handful of individuals.
THE amount spent by the Welsh NHS on redundancy payments has come under fire after figures revealed health boards were spending thousands of pounds on just a handful of staff members.
Thousands of people who were made redundant by their employers are still waiting for their redundancy payments, while the labour ministry plays catch-up despite a Cabinet promise to process all applications by the end of the year.