redundant


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re·dun·dant

 (rĭ-dŭn′dənt)
adj.
1. Exceeding what is necessary or natural; superfluous.
2. Needlessly wordy or repetitive in expression: a student paper filled with redundant phrases.
3. Of or relating to linguistic redundancy.
4. Chiefly British Dismissed or laid off from work, as for being no longer needed.
5. Electronics Of or involving redundancy in electronic equipment.
6. Of or involving redundancy in the transmission of messages.
7. Genetics Degenerate.

[Latin redundāns, redundant-, present participle of redundāre, to overflow : re-, red-, re- + undāre, to surge (from unda, wave; see wed- in Indo-European roots).]

re·dun′dant·ly adv.

redundant

(rɪˈdʌndənt)
adj
1. surplus to requirements; unnecessary or superfluous
2. verbose or tautological
3. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) deprived of one's job because it is no longer necessary for efficient operation: he has been made redundant.
4. (General Engineering) (of components, information, etc) duplicated or added as a precaution against failure, error, etc
5. (Electronics) (of components, information, etc) duplicated or added as a precaution against failure, error, etc
[C17: from Latin redundans overflowing, from redundāre to run back, stream over; see redound]
reˈdundantly adv

re•dun•dant

(rɪˈdʌn dənt)

adj.
1. characterized by verbosity or unnecessary repetition in expressing ideas.
2. exceeding what is usual or necessary: a redundant part.
3. superabundant or superfluous: lush, redundant vegetation.
4. (of a system, equipment, etc.) supplied as a backup, as in a spacecraft.
5. (of language or a linguistic feature) characterized by redundancy; predictable.
6. Chiefly Brit. being unemployed.
[1595–1605; < Latin redundant-, s. of redundāns, present participle of redundāre overflow, be excessive. See redound, -ant]
re•dun′dant•ly, adv.
syn: See wordy.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.redundant - more than is needed, desired, or required; "trying to lose excess weight"; "found some extra change lying on the dresser"; "yet another book on heraldry might be thought redundant"; "skills made redundant by technological advance"; "sleeping in the spare room"; "supernumerary ornamentation"; "it was supererogatory of her to gloat"; "delete superfluous (or unnecessary) words"; "extra ribs as well as other supernumerary internal parts"; "surplus cheese distributed to the needy"
unnecessary, unneeded - not necessary
2.redundant - repetition of same sense in different words; "`a true fact' and `a free gift' are pleonastic expressions"; "the phrase `a beginner who has just started' is tautological"; "at the risk of being redundant I return to my original proposition"- J.B.Conant
prolix - tediously prolonged or tending to speak or write at great length; "editing a prolix manuscript"; "a prolix lecturer telling you more than you want to know"

redundant

adjective
2. superfluous, extra, surplus, excessive, unnecessary, unwanted, inordinate, inessential, supernumerary, de trop (French), supererogatory the conversion of redundant buildings to residential use
superfluous needed, necessary, essential, vital
3. tautological, wordy, repetitious, verbose, padded, diffuse, prolix, iterative, periphrastic, pleonastic The last couplet collapses into redundant adjectives.

redundant

adjective
Using or containing an excessive number of words:
Translations
زائِد، عاطِل عن العَمَلمَصْرُوفٌ مِنَ الـخِدْمَة
nadbytečnýpřebytečnýpropuštěný z práce
overflødig
irtisanottu
suvišan
létszám fölötti
atvinnulaus
余剰人員として解雇された
해고 당한
atleidimas iš darboatliekamasnebereikalingas
lieksnevajadzīgszaudējis darbu
överflödig
ซึ่งออกจากงาน
bị cho thôi việc

redundant

[rɪˈdʌndənt] ADJ
1. (= superfluous) → superfluo
to be redundantestar de más
2. (Gram) → redundante
3. (Brit) [worker] → sin trabajo, parado
to be made redundantser despedido (por reducción de plantilla), quedar sin trabajo
he was made redundant in 1999lo despidieron en 1999, quedó sin trabajo en 1999
automation may make some workers redundantla automatización puede hacer que varios obreros pierdan sus puestos

redundant

[rɪˈdʌndənt] adj
(British) [worker] → licencié(e)
to be made redundant [worker] → être licencié(e)
He was made redundant yesterday → Il a été licencié hier.
[detail, object] → superflu(e); [term] → obsolète; [institution, skills, building] → devenu(e) inutilered wine nvin m rouge

redundant

adj
überflüssig; landüberschüssig; stylezu wortreich, redundant (geh); several redundant buildings have been demolishedmehrere Gebäude, die nicht mehr gebraucht werden, sind abgerissen worden
(Brit Ind: = out of work) → arbeitslos; to make somebody redundantjdn entlassen, jdn freisetzen; to become/to be made redundantden Arbeitsplatz verlieren; he found himself redundanter war plötzlich ohne Arbeitsplatz

redundant

[rɪˈdʌndnt] adj (Brit) (worker) → licenziato/a (per esubero di personale); (detail, object) → superfluo/a (Literature) → ridondante
to be made redundant (worker) → essere licenziato/a (perché in esubero)

redundant

(rəˈdandənt) adjective
(of workers) no longer employed because there is no longer any job for them where they used to work. Fifty men have just been made redundant at the local factory.
reˈdundancyplural reˈdundancies noun
There have been a lot of redundancies at the local factory recently; the problem of redundancy.

redundant

مَصْرُوفٌ مِنَ الـخِدْمَة propuštěný z práce overflødig arbeitslos πλεονάζων despedir a alguien, superfluo irtisanottu licencié suvišan licenziato 余剰人員として解雇された 해고 당한 overtollig overflødig zbyteczny despedido, redundante избыточный överflödig ซึ่งออกจากงาน işten çıkarılmış bị cho thôi việc 多余的
References in classic literature ?
The warmly cool, clear, ringing, perfumed, overflowing, redundant days, were as crystal goblets of Persian sherbet, heaped up --flaked up, with rose-water snow.
He was a small, short, youngish man, sprinkled all over his face with freckles, and wearing redundant yellow hair.
And by hideous con- trast, a redundant orator was making a speech to another gathering not thirty steps away, in fulsome laudation of "our glorious British liberties
It is allowed, that senates and great councils are often troubled with redundant, ebullient, and other peccant humours; with many diseases of the head, and more of the heart; with strong convulsions, with grievous contractions of the nerves and sinews in both hands, but especially the right; with spleen, flatus, vertigos, and deliriums; with scrofulous tumours, full of fetid purulent matter; with sour frothy ructations: with canine appetites, and crudeness of digestion, besides many others, needless to mention.
Unless you adopted the opinion of certain observers of the human heart, and thought that the chevalier had the voice of his nose, his organ of speech would have amazed you by its full and redundant sound.
The result is massacre; not, however, without its advantages, as it eliminates the more brutal and troublesome of the Isosceles; and by many of our Circles the destructiveness of the Thinner Sex is regarded as one among many providential arrangements for suppressing redundant population, and nipping Revolution in the bud.
The Typee girls devote much of their time to the dressing of their fair and redundant locks.
She looked redundant with life, health, and energy; all of which attributes were bound down and compressed, as it were and girdled tensely, in their luxuriance, by her virgin zone.
Was it Hafiz or Firdousi that said of his Persian Lilla, She was an elemental force, and astonished me by her amount of life, when I saw her day after day radiating, every instant, redundant joy and grace on all around her.
The perfect swarm of busily engaged persons moving about noiselessly; the multitude of guests, - who were, however, even less numerous than the servants who waited on them, - the myriad of exquisitely prepared dishes, of gold and silver vases; the floods of dazzling light, the masses of unknown flowers of which the hot-houses had been despoiled, redundant with luxuriance of unequaled scent and beauty; the perfect harmony of the surroundings, which, indeed, was no more than the prelude of the promised
Nothing told me then that she, a few years hence, would be the wife of one entirely unknown to me as yet, but destined hereafter to become a closer friend than even herself, more intimate than that unmannerly lad of seventeen, by whom I was collared in the passage, on coming down, and well-nigh jerked off my equilibrium, and who, in correction for his impudence, received a resounding whack over the sconce, which, however, sustained no serious injury from the infliction; as, besides being more than commonly thick, it was protected by a redundant shock of short, reddish curls, that my mother called auburn.
Mr Partridge acted for some time on the defensive only; indeed he attempted only to guard his face with his hands; but as he found that his antagonist abated nothing of her rage, he thought he might, at least, endeavour to disarm her, or rather to confine her arms; in doing which her cap fell off in the struggle, and her hair being too short to reach her shoulders, erected itself on her head; her stays likewise, which were laced through one single hole at the bottom, burst open; and her breasts, which were much more redundant than her hair, hung down below her middle; her face was likewise marked with the blood of her husband: her teeth gnashed with rage; and fire, such as sparkles from a smith's forge, darted from her eyes.

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