reduplication


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to reduplication: affixation

re·du·pli·ca·tion

 (rĭ-do͞o′plĭ-kā′shən, -dyo͞o′-)
n.
1. The act of reduplicating or the state of being reduplicated.
2. The product or result of reduplicating.
3. Linguistics
a. A word formed by or containing a reduplicated element.
b. The added element in a word form that is reduplicated.

re·du′pli·ca′tive adj.
re·du′pli·ca′tive·ly adv.

reduplication

(rɪˌdjuːplɪˈkeɪʃən)
n
1. the process or an instance of redoubling
2. the state, condition, or quality of being redoubled
3. a thing that has been redoubled
4. (Linguistics) repetition of a sound or syllable in a word, as in the formation of the Latin perfect tetigi from tangere "touch"

re•du•pli•ca•tion

(rɪˌdu plɪˈkeɪ ʃən, -ˌdyu-)

n.
1. an act or instance of reduplicating; the state of being reduplicated.
2.
a. reduplicating as a grammatical pattern.
b. the added element in a reduplicated form.
c. a word formed by reduplication, as hush-hush or helter-skelter.
[1580–90; < Late Latin reduplicātiō. See reduplicate, -tion]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reduplication - repetition of the final words of a sentence or line at the beginning of the next
repetition - the repeated use of the same word or word pattern as a rhetorical device
2.reduplication - the syllable added in a reduplicated word form
syllable - a unit of spoken language larger than a phoneme; "the word `pocket' has two syllables"
3.reduplication - a word formed by or containing a repeated syllable or speech sound (usually at the beginning of the word)
word - a unit of language that native speakers can identify; "words are the blocks from which sentences are made"; "he hardly said ten words all morning"
4.reduplication - the act of repeating over and again (or an instance thereof)
repeating, repetition - the act of doing or performing again

reduplication

noun
Something closely resembling another:
Archaic: simulacre.
Translations

reduplication

[rɪˌdjuːplɪˈkeɪʃən] Nreduplicación f

reduplication

nWiederholung f; (Ling) → Reduplikation f
References in classic literature ?
The conditions of the sentience had been here, he imagined, fulfilled in the method of collocation of these stones--in the order of their arrangement, as well as in that of the many fungi which overspread them, and of the decayed trees which stood around-- above all, in the long undisturbed endurance of this arrangement, and in its reduplication in the still waters of the tarn.
Cousin Caroline was a lady of very imposing height and circumference, but in spite of her size and her handsome trappings, there was something exposed and unsheltered in her expression, as if for many summers her thin red skin and hooked nose and reduplication of chins, so much resembling the profile of a cockatoo, had been bared to the weather; she was, indeed, a single lady; but she had, it was the habit to say, "made a life for herself," and was thus entitled to be heard with respect.
Anderson et al provided photographs demonstrating the mechanisms of spontaneous closure of perimembranous VSD, in which the reduplication of tricuspid valve tissue, adherence of tricuspid valve leaflets, and prolapse of the aortic valve leaflet were responsible for the closure, but so-called AMS was rarely present (11).
uru--'wide, broad' < *vuru--< PIE *urHu-), (1) and the reduplication syllable of roots with the structure vaC (*vuvaC--> uvaC-, e.
The word as a whole is not attested in speech and the partial reduplication suggests a song-specific form.
The presence of abnormal corneal epithelial basement membrane adherence to Bowman's layer, whether by abnormal adhesion complexes or a reduplication of the basement membrane itself, is believed to be the underlying aetiology of recurrent corneal erosion syndrome.
English foot ~ feet 'lab ~ labak'), or reduplication (e.
They are further classified as onomatopoeic expressions (khat khat, 'knocking'), complete reduplication (bara-bara, 'big big'), partial reduplication (thakurthukur, 'God'), semantic reduplication (mathamundu, 'head'), correlative reduplication (maramari, 'fighting') [11].
Reduplication often (but not always: see Taylor 1970) indicates a qualitative intensification: meamea can be a 'whispered' incantation.
How Splunk uses reduplication of threat data to reduce the noise generated by multiple threat feeds
garemani: 'large hoe'), consonant reduplication (e.
kelelungan Venz (2013 a) Benuaq -kelelangtin reduplication of Venz (2013a) kelelungan Benuaq kelemutatn bawaan roh orang- Venz (2013a) orang mati Central kerewaiyu harvest ritual Herrmans Luangan (2011:233) Ngaju kalabawai ein in den Waldem Hardeland hausend Gespenst (1859) Kayan kelebusen newly bereaved Southwell (word from old (1990) customs, implying certain restrictions) Iban kelekuyang tiang k.