reedy


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reed·y

 (rē′dē)
adj. reed·i·er, reed·i·est
1. Full of reeds.
2. Made of reeds.
3. Resembling a reed, especially in being thin or fragile: "reedy businessmen in severe three-piece business suits" (Jimmy Breslin).
4. Music Having a tone like that of a reed instrument.

reed′i·ness n.

reedy

(ˈriːdɪ)
adj, reedier or reediest
1. (Environmental Science) (of a place, esp a marsh) abounding in reeds
2. (Botany) of or like a reed
3. having a tone like a reed instrument; shrill or piping: a reedy voice.
ˈreedily adv
ˈreediness n

reed•y

(ˈri di)

adj. reed•i•er, reed•i•est.
1. full of reeds: a reedy marsh.
2. consisting or made of a reed or reeds.
3. having a sound like that of a reed instrument.
reed′i•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.reedy - having a tone of a reed instrument
noisy - full of or characterized by loud and nonmusical sounds; "a noisy cafeteria"; "a small noisy dog"
2.reedy - resembling a reed in being upright and slender
lean, thin - lacking excess flesh; "you can't be too rich or too thin"; "Yon Cassius has a lean and hungry look"-Shakespeare
Translations

reedy

[ˈriːdɪ] ADJ (reedier (compar) (reediest (superl)))
1. [place] → lleno de cañas, cubierto de juncos
2. [voice, tone, instrument] → aflautado

reedy

[ˈriːdi] adj [voice, instrument] → ténu(e)

reedy

adj (+er)schilfig; soundnäselnd; musicschnarrend; voicedurchdringend; reedy instrumentRohrblattinstrument nt

reedy

[ˈriːdɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (voice, instrument) → acuto/a
References in classic literature ?
The thicket stretched down from the top of one of the sandy knolls, spreading and growing taller as it went, until it reached the margin of the broad, reedy fen, through which the nearest of the little rivers soaked its way into the anchorage.
A hundred yards from where he stood grew a large tree, alone upon the edge of the reedy jungle.
The boat took many such grassy corners and followed many such reedy and silent reaches of river; but before the search had become monotonous they had swung round a specially sharp angle and come into the silence of a sort of pool or lake, the sight of which instinctively arrested them.
Few finer fencing matches can ever have been seen in crowded amphitheatres than that which tinkled and sparkled on that forgotten island in the reedy river.
He saw him in the trees in greater numbers than he ever had seen Histah before; and once beside a reedy pool he caught a scent that could have belonged to none other than Gimla the crocodile, but upon none of these did the Tarmangani care to feed.
We three blue-clad men, with our misshapen black-faced attendant, standing in a wide expanse of sunlit yellow dust under the blazing blue sky, and surrounded by this circle of crouching and gesticulating monstrosities,-- some almost human save in their subtle expression and gestures, some like cripples, some so strangely distorted as to resemble nothing but the denizens of our wildest dreams; and, beyond, the reedy lines of a canebrake in one direction, a dense tangle of palm-trees on the other, separating us from the ravine with the huts, and to the north the hazy horizon of the Pacific Ocean.
Green, reedy swamps; fields fertile but flat, cultivated in patches that made them look like magnified kitchen-gardens; belts of cut trees, formal as pollard willows, skirting the horizon; narrow canals, gliding slow by the road-side; painted Flemish farmhouses; some very dirty hovels; a gray, dead sky; wet road, wet fields, wet house-tops: not a beautiful, scarcely a picturesque object met my eye along the whole route; yet to me, all was beautiful, all was more than picturesque.
In consequence of that friendship the women of Gobila's village walked in single file through the reedy grass, bringing every morning to the station, fowls, and sweet potatoes, and palm wine, and sometimes a goat.
The light at the top was suddenly whisked out, and from the darkness came a reedy, quivering voice.
224-251) But Reedy took to flight when he saw Ham-nibbler, and fled, plunging into the lake and throwing away his shield.
Mrs Plornish's father,--a poor little reedy piping old gentleman, like a worn-out bird; who had been in what he called the music- binding business, and met with great misfortunes, and who had seldom been able to make his way, or to see it or to pay it, or to do anything at all with it but find it no thoroughfare,--had retired of his own accord to the Workhouse which was appointed by law to be the Good Samaritan of his district (without the twopence, which was bad political economy), on the settlement of that execution which had carried Mr Plornish to the Marshalsea College.
Somewhere down in the woods below a bird was trying over in a husky, reedy voice the first few notes of his spring song.