reef


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Related to reef: billabong

reef 1

 (rēf)
n.
1. A strip or ridge of rocks, sand, or coral that rises to or near the surface of a body of water.
2. A vein of ore.
3. Chiefly Western US A long craggy ridge or rocky escarpment.

[Obsolete Dutch rif, possibly from Old Norse, ridge.]

reef′y adj.

reef 2

 (rēf) Nautical
n.
A portion of a sail gathered in and secured to lessen the area exposed to the wind.
tr.v. reefed, reef·ing, reefs
1. To reduce the size of (a sail) by gathering in a part and securing it, as by lashing it to a yard.
2. To shorten (a topmast or bowsprit) by taking part of it in.

[Partly from Middle English rif (from Old Norse rif, from rīfa, to rive) and partly from Dutch and Low German reef (Low German, from Dutch), back-formation from Dutch reven, pl. of rif, reef (of a sail), from or akin to Old Norse rif.]

reef

(riːf)
n
1. (Geological Science) a ridge of rock, sand, coral, etc, the top of which lies close to the surface of the sea
2. (Geological Science) a ridge- or mound-like structure built by sedentary calcareous organisms (esp corals) and consisting mainly of their remains
3. (Mining & Quarrying) a vein of ore, esp one of gold-bearing quartz
[C16: from Middle Dutch ref, from Old Norse rif rib1, reef2]

reef

(riːf) nautical
n
(Nautical Terms) the part gathered in when sail area is reduced, as in a high wind
vb
1. (Nautical Terms) to reduce the area of (sail) by taking in a reef
2. (Nautical Terms) (tr) to shorten or bring inboard (a spar)
[C14: from Middle Dutch rif; related to Old Norse rif reef, rib1, German reffen to reef; see reef1]

Reef

(riːf)
n
1. (Placename) another name for the Great Barrier Reef
2. (Placename) another name for the Witwatersrand

reef1

(rif)

n.
1. a ridge of rocks or sand, often of coral debris, at or near the surface of the water.
2. Mining. a lode or vein.
[1575–85; earlier riff(e) < Dutch rif]

reef2

(rif)

n.
1. a part of a sail that is rolled and tied down to reduce the area exposed to the wind.
v.t.
2. to shorten (a sail) by tying in one or more reefs.
3. to reduce the length of (a topmast, a bowsprit, etc.).
[1350–1400; Middle English refe (n.) < Dutch reef]

reef

(rēf)
An irregular mass of rock or coral that rises up to or near the surface of a body of water. See more at coral reef.

reef

- From Old Norse rif, "rib."
See also related terms for rib.

reef


Past participle: reefed
Gerund: reefing

Imperative
reef
reef
Present
I reef
you reef
he/she/it reefs
we reef
you reef
they reef
Preterite
I reefed
you reefed
he/she/it reefed
we reefed
you reefed
they reefed
Present Continuous
I am reefing
you are reefing
he/she/it is reefing
we are reefing
you are reefing
they are reefing
Present Perfect
I have reefed
you have reefed
he/she/it has reefed
we have reefed
you have reefed
they have reefed
Past Continuous
I was reefing
you were reefing
he/she/it was reefing
we were reefing
you were reefing
they were reefing
Past Perfect
I had reefed
you had reefed
he/she/it had reefed
we had reefed
you had reefed
they had reefed
Future
I will reef
you will reef
he/she/it will reef
we will reef
you will reef
they will reef
Future Perfect
I will have reefed
you will have reefed
he/she/it will have reefed
we will have reefed
you will have reefed
they will have reefed
Future Continuous
I will be reefing
you will be reefing
he/she/it will be reefing
we will be reefing
you will be reefing
they will be reefing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been reefing
you have been reefing
he/she/it has been reefing
we have been reefing
you have been reefing
they have been reefing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been reefing
you will have been reefing
he/she/it will have been reefing
we will have been reefing
you will have been reefing
they will have been reefing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been reefing
you had been reefing
he/she/it had been reefing
we had been reefing
you had been reefing
they had been reefing
Conditional
I would reef
you would reef
he/she/it would reef
we would reef
you would reef
they would reef
Past Conditional
I would have reefed
you would have reefed
he/she/it would have reefed
we would have reefed
you would have reefed
they would have reefed

reef

A ridge of rocks or coral that is usually submerged in the sea.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reef - a submerged ridge of rock or coral near the surface of the waterreef - a submerged ridge of rock or coral near the surface of the water
coral reef - a reef consisting of coral consolidated into limestone
ridge - a long narrow natural elevation or striation
2.Reef - a rocky region in the southern Transvaal in northeastern South Africa; contains rich gold deposits and coal and manganese
Transvaal - a province of northeastern South Africa originally inhabited by Africans who spoke Bantu; colonized by the Boers
3.reef - one of several strips across a sail that can be taken in or rolled up to lessen the area of the sail that is exposed to the wind
sail, canvass, canvas, sheet - a large piece of fabric (usually canvas fabric) by means of which wind is used to propel a sailing vessel
strip, slip - artifact consisting of a narrow flat piece of material
Verb1.reef - lower and bring partially inboard; "reef the sailboat's mast"
bring down, let down, lower, take down, get down - move something or somebody to a lower position; "take down the vase from the shelf"
2.reef - roll up (a portion of a sail) in order to reduce its area
furl, roll up - form into a cylinder by rolling; "Roll up the cloth"
3.reef - reduce (a sail) by taking in a reef
shrink, reduce - reduce in size; reduce physically; "Hot water will shrink the sweater"; "Can you shrink this image?"

reef

noun shoal, key, bar, shelf, spit, ridge, ledge, atoll, barrier reef An unspoilt coral reef encloses the bay.
Translations
سِلْسِلَة صُخور فَوْق سَطْح الماء
rifútes
rev
rif
rifas
refować
čer
rev
resifsığ kayalık

reef

1 [riːf] N (Geog) → arrecife m

reef

2 [riːf]
A. N (= sail) → rizo m
to let out a reeflargar rizos (fig) → aflojar el cinturón
to take in a reeftomar rizos (fig) → apretarse el cinturón
B. VTarrizar
C. CPD reef knot Nnudo m de rizo

reef

[ˈriːf] n (in sea)récif m, écueil m
a coral reef → un récif de corail

reef

1
n
(in sea) → Riff nt
(Min) → Ader f, → Gang m

reef

2
n (Naut) → Reff nt
vt sailreffen

reef

1 [riːf] n (Geog) → scogliera, banco di scogli
coral reef → barriera corallina

reef

2 [riːf] (Naut)
1. nterzarolo
to take in a reef (Naut) → prendere una mano di terzaroli
2. vtterzarolare

reef

(riːf) noun
a line of rocks etc just above or below the surface of the sea. The ship got stuck on a reef.
References in classic literature ?
Sometimes, indeed, none too soon; for one reef was so close on the brig's weather board that when a sea burst upon it the lighter sprays fell upon her deck and wetted us like rain.
At eight o'clock I had succeeded only in putting the second reef into the foresail.
It was on a reef of rocks, a few leagues from Porto de la Plata.
1846; The Red Skins, 1846; The Crater (Marks Reef), 1847; Captain Spike, or the Islets of the Gulf, 1848; Jack Tier, or the Florida Reefs, 1848; The Oak Openings, or the Bee-Hunter, 1848; The Sea Lions,
But as he watched it grow in definiteness he saw that it was a coral reef smoking in the white Pacific surges.
He may even now--if I may use the phrase--be wandering on some plesiosaurus-haunted Oolitic coral reef, or beside the lonely saline lakes of the Triassic Age.
Yes, and we flipped it at the rate of ten gallons the hour; and when the squall came (for it's squally off there by Patagonia), and all hands --visitors and all --were called to reef topsails, we were so top-heavy that we had to swing each other aloft in bowlines; and we ignorantly furled the skirts of our jackets into the sails, so that we hung there, reefed fast in the howling gale, a warning example to all drunken tars.
The monster became a small island, a rock, a reef, but a reef of indefinite and shifting proportions.
Sometimes Strickland would go down to the reef, and come back with a basket of small, coloured fish that Ata would fry in cocoa-nut oil, or with a lobster; and sometimes she would make a savoury dish of the great land-crabs that scuttled away under your feet.
News, as usual, Christian Young brought--news of the drinking at Guvutu, where the men boasted that they drank between drinks; news of the new rifles adrift on Ysabel, of the latest murders on Malaita, of Tom Butler's sickness on Santa Ana; and last and most important, news that the Matambo had gone on a reef in the Shortlands and would be laid off one run for repairs.
He even shook out his reefs in order to rise more quickly.
To navigate a vessel through the reefs and shoals and passages and unlighted coasts of the coral seas is a man's work in itself.