referred pain


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re·ferred pain

(rĭ-fûrd′)
n.
Pain that is felt in a part of the body at a distance from the area of pathology, as pain in the right shoulder derived from the presence of a gallstone in the bladder.

referred pain

n
(Psychology) psychol pain felt in the body at some place other than its actual place of origin
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.referred pain - pain that is felt at a place in the body different from the injured or diseased part where the pain would be expected; "angina pectoris can cause referred pain in the left shoulder"; "pain in the right shoulder can be referred pain from gallbladder disease"
hurting, pain - a symptom of some physical hurt or disorder; "the patient developed severe pain and distension"
References in periodicals archive ?
including facet arthropathy myeloma Soft-tissue injuries Myopathy Infections of bone, disc or epidura Lumbosacral Referred pain plexopathy Table 5.
An urgent case at the moment has been six months, how much longer will he have to wait, there is no quality of life, referred pain only adds to the problem, painkillers, well 2 a day mess with your head (and you can take 8 a day) in this area we worked very well with three hospitals, now it is chaos.
Perhaps it's a bit of referred pain as he's been up and doing more running.
The pain in your lips is referred pain from the nerve that supplies the tooth.
We describe the case of a 51-year-old man who presented with severe pain in his tongue and throat and referred pain in his right ear, along with odynophagia, fever, and hoarseness of 48 hours'duration.
Sophie said: "My mum had been ill for a while and had been to her GP a few times with back pain, which can be referred pain from cancer.
Myofascial trigger points are defined as hyperirritable points located in taut bands of skeletal muscle or fascia which when compressed cause local tenderness and/or referred pain (Simons 2002, Tough et al 2009, Yap 2007).
In particular, the first chapter focuses on the neurophysiology of myofascial pain, referred pain and TrPs, and the pathophysiology ofTrPs.
He had a niggle allegedly in his hamstring, but it may have been a bit of referred pain from his back but he has moved nicely again.
They present about 200 photos of key anatomical landmarks by region, with labeled overlays and brief descriptions, and include reference to movements, cutaneous innervation, referred pain, surgical/anesthetic access, and clinical conditions.
The subjects were not allowed to mention whether they felt any pain in the area being palpated at the time of palpation, but they were later asked if pain and referred pain were felt when certain areas were palpated.
The end result is joint wear and tear, disc degeneration, an increased likelihood of muscle spasms, and experiencing referred pain syndromes or sciatica.