refinancing


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re·fin·ance

 (rē′fə-năns′, rē-fī′năns′)
v. re·fi·nanced, re·fi·nanc·ing, re·fi·nanc·es
v.tr.
To renegotiate or replace the financing of (a debt or asset), usually to obtain a lower interest rate.
v.intr.
To finance a debt or asset under new terms.

re·fi′nance′ n.
re′fi·nan′cer n.

refinancing

(ˌriːfaɪˈnænsɪŋ)
n
(Banking & Finance) a method of paying a debt by borrowing additional money thus creating a second debt in order to pay the first
Translations

refinancing

nRefinanzierung f, → Neufinanzierung f
References in periodicals archive ?
Eastern Union Funding announced the following refinancing transactions:
Freddie Mac reported that the average interest-rate reduction in the first quarter for borrowers refinancing was roughly 1.
5 percent will save over $80,000 in interest payments over the life of the loan, even after accounting for typical refinancing costs.
recently released a guide designed for homeowners in California that are considering refinancing their mortgages.
Due to the recent buzz on the internet and television regarding interest rates, I decided to focus on the topic of refinancing for this issue.
As Kinney points out, "Moving or refinancing isn't always as easy as people think.
To do so would be economic lunacy, of course--but Greenspan obviously understood that mortgage refinancing is the only engine driving consumer spending, and thereby keeping the U.
Under the final regulations, a refinanced loan may be treated as two loans in one--a continuation of the prior loan, plus a new refinancing loan equal to the difference between the prior loan balance and the refinanced amount.
has shed about 500 jobs, most of them temporary or contract workers, since July as rising interest rates have chilled the refinancing boom.
Loans in existence on August 10, 1996, were grandfathered, subject to certain binding commitment and refinancing rules found in section 1602(c) of the act.
In an address to the nation last summer, the President illustrated how a middle class family with a $100,000, 10% mortgage could put an additional $175 in their pocket each month by refinancing the mortgage at 7.
We do not think that the degree to which problems exist has been sufficiently established to justify additional general regulation in the area of refinancing disclosures, rebate calculation methods, and rate commitments.